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History of the Moon Family

By William H. Moon

THE TIMES PUBLISHING COMPANY
Conyers, Georgia


PREFACE

It is customary for authors to give some reasons for writing and publishing a book, and in conformity with this custom, I give a few of the many reasons I have for writing and publishing this book.


For three years I have been seeking for information in regard to the ancestral history of this family, and after succeeding in gathering in a great store of facts pertaining to this family, I have decided to write a book and place it before this great family, so that this knowledge may not be lost, but handed down to generations yet to be born, and that they may see and catch an inspiration from the influences that some of their forefathers carried in their lives.


The love of fame and a desire to communicate information, have influenced men in almost every age and every nation, to leave behind them some memorials of their existence, actions and discoveries.


In the earliest ages of the world, the mode of conveying to posterity an account of important facts was very vogue and uncertain; the most obvious and easy was first resorted to. Thus, when Joshua led the twelve tribes of Israel over the River of Jordan, in a miraculous manner, he set up twelve stones for a memorial, but it was necessary for tradition to explain the circumstances which gave rise to it.


So the purpose of this book is, that it may be handed down from generation to generation, so that those unborn may be influenced by the lives of some of the present generation, and be influenced to do still greater and nobler things.


Dear reader, after you read this book, let me urge you to preserve it so it can be handed down to your children and your children's children, and may God bless them in any effort they may undertake, is my prayer. N. B. Do not criticize the author until you have written a book. WILLIAM H. MOON. Conyers, Ga., March 6th, 1920.


CONTENTS

Origin of the Moon Name
Characteristics of the Moon Family
The Moons in North Carolina and Georgia
Thomas Moon
Jesse Moon
John Willingham Moon
Joseph K. Moon
Cicero Moon
W. L. Moon
Thomas Jefferson Moon
Sarah N. E. Moon
John Francis Moon
Isaac N. Moon
Lucy Ellen Moon
W. W. L. Moon
Stephen C. Moon
John William Moon
Madison Moon
Lewis Moon
Pattie Moon
Betsie Moon
Rachael Moon
Amy Moon
Lewis Moon, Sr
Mary Ann Moon
Thomas Moon, Jr.
Edom Moon, Sr
Pattie Moon
Edom Moon, Jr.
Jabez Moon
Thomas B. Moon
Woodson Daniel Moon
Elizabeth Sarah Moon
Lydia Ann Moon
Benjamin Franklin Moon
Hilmon Allen Moon
Albert Sidney Johnston Moon
Sarah Ann Moon
Joseph Moon
William E. Moon
T. M. Moon
Fannie Moon
Robert L. Moon
William E. Moon, Jr.
Descendants of T. M. and Mary Moon
Creacy Moon
Susan Moon
Frank A. Irwin
J.R. Irwin
Milton C. Irwin
Mary C. Irwin
Mark D. Irwin
C. B. Irwin
Thomas Moon (son of Joseph)
Stephen LaFayette Moon
Edward T. Moon
Joseph Noah Moon
Homer Moon
William Henry Moon
Mamie T. Moon
Ida J. (Moon) Carter
Alice Elizabeth Moon
Sereptha Angeline Moon
Marshal LaFayette Moon
Gordon DeKalb Moon
Joseph DeKalb Moon
Albert F. Moon
Walter D. Moon
Homer C. Moon
Myrtie C. Moon
George Washington Moon
Catherine Moon
Addie Moon
James R. Mitchell
Mattie Bell Mitchell
Andrew J. Moon
Augustus J. Moon
Savannah Moon
Josephine Elizabeth Moon
Jefferson D. Long
Richard A. Long
Joseph Erastus Long
Mattie Long
Nettie Long
Mollie Long
Edom T. Moon
Troy Moon
Charles Knox Polk Moon
Franklin Pierce Moon
Sarah E. Moon
Martha Amy Moon
The Moon Reunion
Other Moons
J. C. Moon
J. Robert Moon
Moons in Ohio
Moons in New York
Eight Moon Brothers
Genealogy
The Bookout Family
The Baggett Family
Cobb County Reunion
Moons Here and There
Pleasant LaFayette Moon
P.L. Moon
John L. Moon
Joseph M. Moon
R. T. Moon
Charles M. Moon
Carrie D. Moon
Robert Moon
Sandy Moon
The Moon Family
U. S. Census Report
John D. Moon
Biographical Sketch of Joseph Moon
Descendants of Joseph Moon
Other Families Who Descended From the Moon Family
Cynthia Victoria Moon
Early English Family History
Sowing and Reaping
Profanity
Life
Advice to the Younger Generation
The Author's Note

Origin of the Moon Name

BEFORE, and at the beginning of the Christian era, people had just one name, such as Paul, Silas, John and Peter. As the population grew there was a confusion of names by several persons having the same name. To avoid this, surnames had to be added to the first or Christian name. These names were obtained in various ways. For example, Robert was by trade a jewel smith, hence he was called Robert Smith. His only son was called Robertson, and John's eldest son was called Johnson. James, the miller, was called James Miller, and so on.


The Moon name originated in a very peculiar manner, but nevertheless it should mean very much to this family, as we shall see little farther on.


The ancestral history of this family is quite elaborate, extending back through the avenues of several centuries. During a certain period of history the Kingdom of Denmark formed a part of the English dominion. Within this period of English rule the king of England made a requisition on the king of Denmark for a regiment of soldiers. The Danish monarch, regarding it an honor, furnished the king with a selection of men, erect in stature, athletic, brave, and of a determined mind; of light complexion, blue eyes, red hair, with temper, and six feet tall. The banner which they fought under had, in addition to the national colors, the inscription of a half moon; they fought a battle by the light of the moon and won a great victory, which pleased the king very much for their bravery and success, for which the king granted them land in England if they would settle there. A large number accepted the offer and settled in a colony. Then they unanimously adopted the name of moon, and the land grant was given in this name. This is given as the origin of the name Moon.


Dear reader, you ought to be proud of this name, which is the beginning of your ancestral name. Your pedigree sprang from these selected soldiers, perfect in every respect, the highest type of man.


Now it is left with you to maintain this high standard by right living and right marriage. No doubt but this standard has been lowered during all these years that have lapsed since this high standard was set up, so it is with you whether you lower it or not.


Before I conclude this chapter I will relate a short story to impress the name Moon. This very fittingly represents the different phases of the moon: Once upon a time ----- Moon bought some whisky with the first quarter he had earned. This was the "first quarter." He drank a little too much. This was the "full moon." He spent all the money he had, which was a quarter, to sober up on. This was the "last quarter." He came home and his wife mauled him on the head with the rolling-pin. This represented an "eclipse." So he demonstrated all the changes of the moon.


The Characteristics of the Moon Family

WHAT they are they are, and they don't care who knows it.If they are for a thing, they are for it, because they believe it is right; and if they are against it, they oppose it with all their might, because they believe it wrong, and not for the purpose of gaining public applause. It is no trouble to find where they stand on any question. They are plain and outspoken in their convictions, though, they are considerate of the feelings of those who entertain views contrary to their own, and are usually cautious in expressions, to avoid wounding the feelings of others who may differ from them. They are absolutely free from deceit or hypocrisy. They hate a hypocrite with all the powers that they possess. A favor conferred on a Moon is always a live asset and one is convertible at any time by the person conferring it, for none of them can ever be accused of ingratitude. They are loyal to their friends and are always ready to serve them, but I am somewhat afraid that some of them may have at times failed to obey the Biblical injunction to pray for their enemies.


They have been accused of being high-tempered, and I am of opinion that we might as well plead guilty to this indictment without going to trial. But what if we are high-tempered? Is it he high-tempered steel that goes into the manufacture of our cutlery, worth $2,000 a ton, while pig-iron is worth $20, and iron $4 a ton? I would rather plead guilty to the charge than to be classed with pig iron or the scrap iron gang. The most of us have sense enough to control our temper, until we reach that point where we are justified in letting our tempers control us. I admit that some members of the family, when they have been smitten on one cheek, have failed and refused to turn the other to their antagonist. I do not think this is done on account of a spirit of contrariness, but that prudence dictates this policy, for we are informed that in the long ago our great-uncle, Charles Bookout, was slapped on one cheek, and he being a very pious man, turned his other cheek to his assailant, whereupon the brute struck on the proffered cheek with an umbrella and broke it. This incident has very likely had its influence in keeping us from offer the other cheek.


They are good law-abiding citizens, and it is very rare that a Moon ever has a case in court, either on the civil or criminal side. They are prudent and cautious in their business affairs, and are not the kind of people to buy gold bricks, or bite at the get-rich-quick schemes. They prefer to be safe rather than speculative. They would rather loan money (if they have any) at a low rate of interest, with good security, than at a high rate of interest with doubtful security. They are prompt to pay their debts and expect others to treat them the same way. They never go into bankruptcy, or take advantage of the homestead laws, to keep from paying their debts. Their word is as good as their bond. They are, with exceptions, people whose veracity is never questioned. They always take an active interest in politics, but it is very seldom that any of them ask for office for themselves. They prefer to aid their friends rather than ask their friends to aid them. This has been true of the family as far back as we have any knowledge of the family. It was especially true in Virginia many years ago, for it is said that while they were a controlling power in politics that they never aspired for an office themselves. None of them are wealthy but it is very rare that any of them reach middle age without owning a good home and being in moderate circumstances. They occupy that happy middle-ground where they are not troubled with the care of wealth, nor of the fear of ever coming to want, or having to appeal to the charity of the world. They usually contribute freely to worthy appeals for charity, and they would be the last people in the world to ask for charity. They attend to their own business and let other people's business alone. They are no news carriers or scandal mongers, and have but little respect for those who are. If they dislike a person, he need have no fear of being stabbed in the back, or of having his person or his character assassinated. They despise a bully, and while they are peacable and law abiding citizens, yet they are not without courage, and are quick to resent an insult. They possess a great deal of personal as well as family pride, and any person who reflects on the family name is likely to stir up a hornet's nest.


There is always a very strong affection between parent and child, and this love grows stronger with age. No matter how badly afflicted the parent may become with old age, the son and daughter never tires or complains in administering to his necessities or comforts. No matter how great the sacrifice, the child is always glad to make it, if by doing so he can add to the happiness of father and mother in time of old age or afflictions. They are great lovers of children, and they are very patient and indulgent with their children, yet they never fail to teach the child very important lessons of obedience. Although the father is very liberal in bestowing his affections on the child, the child knows full well that the father's command must be obeyed, and that the father's will is law unto him.


While they are good citizens in time of peace they are equally as good soldiers when their country was involved in war. Tradition teaches us that the family name of Moon was won by heroic service to their country on the battlefield nearly a thousand years ago, and all of the information that we have been able to obtain indicates, that they have from that day until the present time, been ready at all times to lay down their lives if need be in defense of their country. Even in the Civil War, we find that John Willingham Moon furnished seven sons; his sister, Polly (Moon) Baggett, ten sons, and his Uncle, Joseph Moon, of Walton County, eight sons and one grandson who fought for the Confederacy. But few families contributed as much to the Confederacy as ours. It has been said that prior to the Civil War the Moon family dominated the politics of the State of Virginia, and no person could count on being elected to office without the support of the Moon family. The Moons, as a rule, are very stout and long-lived. Many of them lived to be ninety-six years old.


The Moons in North Carolina and Georgia

FROM Virginia some of the descendants of William Moon emigrated to North Carolina. I don't know just when they went into North Carolina, but know, according to the U. S. Census for the year 1790, there were more Moons in North Caroline than in any other state. There were 20 families, with a population of 121. The same census report shows that they were prosperous, for they owned at that time 99 slaves, or an average of nearly one slave to each man, woman and child.


I do not know just when the Moons first came to Georgia. I know that there were Moons residing in Georgia prior to, and during the Revolutionary War. Thomas Moon, a native of North Carolina, whose wife before her marriage, was Sarah Brooks, is the common ancestor of all the Moons of Georgia. I do not know the date on which he came to Georgia, but do known his son, Joseph, the youngest of twelve children, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, in the year 1796. His son, Jesse, one of the oldest of twelve children, was also born in Columbia County, Georgia. Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon then evidently must have been residents of that county at the time of the beginning of the Revolutionary War.


The census records for Georgia for the year 1790 were destroyed by the British in the War of 1812, therefore cannot get any aid from this source as to the number of Moons in Georgia at that time or when they came to Georgia. I don't know the date of the birth of Thomas Moon, but I know he died at the age of 96 years, and he was still living in the year of 1855, for I have in my possession a letter dated March 27, 1855, written by my father, LaFayette Moon, to his father while he was staying with his grandfather, Thomas Moon, going to school in Columbia County. From this fact, if he died during the year 1855, that would place his birth in the year 1759. Now as to Thomas Moon being a native of England, I cannot say positively. Tradition has it that he and two other brothers came from England and settled in Georgia or North Carolina, and does not mention the names of the other two brothers. I have heard my uncle, William, the oldest son of Joseph Moon, say that his grandfather came from England. J. W. Moon, of Paulding County, who has furnished me a great deal of information relative this family, believes that Thomas Moon was either a son or a grandson of William Moon, who emigrated from England prior to 1660, with two brothers, John and Rollo. John settled in Newport, Rhode Island, Rollo settled in what is now Berk County, Pennsylvania, about the same time, and William settled in Virginia. I am inclined to believe that there were Moons that emigrated at several different times. I have corresponded with G. R. Moon, of Martinsville, Ohio, who says the Moons of that state are quite numerous. He says that his branch of the family emigrated from England as far back as William Penn's time.


The following is the information that J. W. Moon gave me: John, Rollo and William Moon came to America more than 250 ago and when the first permanent settlement at Jamestown was only about 50 years old. They were here more than 116 years before the Declaration of Independence was signed. William is the emigrant ancestor of all the Moons in the South. Some of his progeny reside in Virginia, where they are very prominent. They regarded as the social equals of the very best people in that state, they having intermarried with the Lees, Martins and other prominent families of Virginia, as is generally characteristic of the Moon family. The Moons of Virginia have named many of their children for their ancestor, William Moon, the emigrant. In 1770, of five families in Virginia, three of the heads of families were named William. This within itself is corroborative proof of the fact our emigrant ancestor was named William,


By the census report for Georgia of 1790 being destroyed, leaves a broken link in the ancestral chain, so I will leave this for the many readers to solve. Anyway, it is a positive fact that we are of English descent.


Sketches of the Moons

THOMAS MOON

THOMAS MOON, the ancestor of the Moons in Georgia, was born between 1759 and 1762. I cannot give his paternal parents. He married Miss Sarah Brooks and lived in Columbia County, Georgia; was a farmer and owned a number of slaves. There were born unto him twelve children, Jesse, Edom, Louis, James, Raleigh, Thomas, Joseph, Amy and Polly, the names of the other three I do not know. Possibly they were children of a former wife and did not come to Georgia. We will notice from this ancestor down to the present, that the Moons generally had a large family of boys, which accounts for so many Moons in the South. They believe in keeping the race from running out. It also seems from a letter I received from G. R. Moon, of Ohio, that the Moons of that state raised a large family of boys. A Joseph Moon of that state had thirteen sons and 829 great-grandchildren.


JESSE MOON

JESSE MOON, son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about 1780. He was married three times. The first marriage was to Rachael Willingham, of Columbia County, Georgia, and to them were born the following children: Thomas, who married a Miss Davis; John Willingham, who was married twice, first to Miss Harriet Cole and after her death to Miss Prudence Baggett; Rachael, who married Jack Griffin and Polly, who married Burton Baggett. After the death of his first wife he married Miss Creasy Willingham, a sister of his first wife, and to them were born the following children: Madison, who married twice, the first time to a Miss Richardson, and the second time to Miss Margareth Caloway; Lewis, who married Kate Webb; Cash, who married Miss Davis, sister of the Miss Davis who married Thomas Moon; Nelope, who married Sanford Fulse; Sandal,(called Sallie,) who married Charles Bookout, and Patsy, (called Patty,) who married James Webb. All of the above-named children were born in Columbia County, Georgia. After the death of his second wife he married Polly Brown about the year 1846. They then lived in Randolph County, Alabama, where he raised a large family. I can only give the names of two, James and Jesse.


He began life a poor man, and by thrift and industry he became at one time very wealthy for a man of his day. He owned four or five thousand acres of valuable farming lands in Walton County, Georgia, and seventy-five or more slaves. His tract of land lay north of Sharon Baptist church. He donated three acres for the church when it was organized in 1845, just after the split-up of Gum Creek church.


After the loss of his second wife he made a grave mistake in the selection of his third wife. There seemed to have been a lack of congeniality between himself and this woman. She squandered and wasted his fortune and they separated several years before his death. His last days must to have been very unhappy, by being separated from his wife and the fortune that he had accumulated in a lifetime was all gone through no fault of his. Jesse must of had fifteen or twenty children, but I have not been able to trace all of them. This set of Moons all lived to be very old. Indeed they averaged ninety years or more. Dr. York, formerly of Decatur, Ala., but later of Decatur, Texas, claimed that he was the family physician of Jesse Moon, saying he was 112 years old when he died. Some of the relatives doubt the truth of this statement, but it is known that he lived to be a very old man.


JOHN WILLINGHAM MOON

JOHN WILLINGHAM MOON, son of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, and grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks)Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, on April 14, 1802. On February 20, 1820, he was married to Miss Harriet Cole, the daughter of Marcus Cole, of Columbia County, Georgia. He continued after his marriage to reside in Columbia County until the year 1824, when he moved to Walton County, Georgia. He resided in Walton County until 1837, when he moved to Cobb County and settled on Powder Springs creek, near the line of Paulding County where he lived until his death on May 27, 1876.


To them were born eleven children, nine sons and two daughters. His two oldest children were born in Columbia County; all of the others except the two youngest were born in Walton County; the two youngest were born in Cobb County. The names of their children are as follows: Joseph K., Cicero D., W. L., (known as Coot,) Thomas Jefferson, John Frances, Isaac N., Lucy Ellen, W. W. Lump' J. M. Lee, Stephen C., Sarah N. E. Harriet (Cole) Moon died May 3, 1843, and John Willingham Moon on November 1843, was married to Miss Prudence Baggett, of Cobb County, Georgia. To them were born six children, as follows: Mariles J., born September 30,1844. She married John Summers. Mary Elizabeth, born March 7, 1847, and married James R. Summers; died May 24, 1914. Susan L., born December 16, 1849; married to David S. Poole. Benjamin F., born September 11, 1864, and married Miss Mary Paris. Rachael R., born October 3,1867; married to James R. Eliot. Willie was born March 6, 1860, and was married to William R. House.


Prior to the Civil War John Willingham Moon had accumulated considerable property and was the owner of a few slaves. When he discovered that his father's third wife was wasting his property he sent two of his sons, John Frances and Cicero D., to Randolph County, Ala., the home of his father at that time, and had them get some of his father's slaves and bring them back to Georgia. These slaves remained with him until they were emancipated.


Many years before his death he joined the Primitive Baptist church and lived a consistent Christian life. He was for many years clerk of the Marietta Primitive Baptist Association. He was an exemplary citizen, and he had the moral courage to stand for that which was right, and to condemn that which was wrong without any regard whatever as to whether his course met with popular approval. This same noble principle was characteristic of all his children.


When the Civil War came on he was intensely loyal to the South, and while he was too old to do military duty himself, he furnished seven sons and two sons-in-law, who did valiant service for the Confederacy. All of these, save two, W. W. Lump and Stephen C., who died from sickness while in the army, return at the close of the war to their homes and families, where lived as good citizens as they did soldiers. It was the boast of Willingham Moon that he had seven sons and two sons-in-law who went through the war, and that not one of them was ever hit by a Yankee bullet. On account of his strong stand for the Confederacy, the Yankee army destroyed much valuable property belonged to him when Sherman's army came through Georgia.


JOSEPH K. MOON

Joseph K. MOON, son of John Willingham and Harriet Moon was born in Columbia County, Georgia, December 22,1820 He was married to Miss Mary Butner, of Walton County, , and to them were born six children. He was four years old when his father moved to Walton County, and came with his family to Cobb County when he was about sixteen years of age. After he settled in the last-named County, where he continued to reside until his death on July 12, 1870. Soon after the end of hostilities in the Civil War, he enlisted as Sergeant of Company D., Seventh Georgia Infantry; later he was promoted to Lieutenant of that company. Before the close of the war he was transferred to Company I., of the same regiment, where he continued until the close of the war. He was a member of Springville Lodge F. and A. M., at Powder Springs, Ga., and filled the office of W. M., and Secretary of that lodge.


CICERO D. MOON

Cicero D. MOON was also born in Columbia County, Georgia on December 13, 1822. He came to Cobb County with his father married to Miss Ferruby Bullard, of that county, and to them were born eight children. After the death of his first wife he was again married, to Mrs. Susan McCutcheon, who, prior to her marriage, was Miss Susan Bullard, a sister of his first wife. He settled in Cobb County, near Powder Springs, where he resided until his death on August 27, 1899. He too was a member of the Springville Lodge of F. and A. M., for many years. He also did service for the Confederacy.


W. L. MOON

W. L. MOON, (known as Coot,) son of John Willingham Harriet (Cole) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, December 20, 1824, and was married to Miss Milsey E. Webb, of Walton County, and to them were born seven children. When the Civil War came on he enlisted as a private in Company D., Seventh Georgia Infantry, and served the Confederacy until the close of the war. He, like his two older brothers, was a Mason and a member of Springville lodge for many years. After his marriage he settled on a farm in Cobb County near Powder Springs, where resided until his death on February 5, 1876.


THOMAS JEFFERSON MOON

THOMAS JEFFERSON MOON, son of John Willingham Harriet (Cole) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on 28, 1826, and was married to Miss Elizabeth Moon, of Walton County, a daughter of Thomas Moon, and grand-daughter of and Rachael (Willingham) Moon. She was a first cousin to husband. To them were born five children. He enlisted as private in Company B., 41st Georgia Regiment of the Confederate army, and served until the close of the war. He too settled on a farm in Cobb County and resided there until his death in the year 1889.


SARAH N. E. MOON

SARAH N. E. MOON, daughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Cole) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on October 24, 1828. She was married to Jacob D. Moore, of Cobb County and to them were born nine children. They resided on a farm near the line of Paulding and Cobb counties until her death on August 22, 1910.


JOHN FRANCIS MOON

JOHN FRANCIS MOON, son of John Willingham and Harriet (Cole) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on May 6, 1830, and was married to Miss Saphronia Adcock, of Cobb County on February 17, 1856. The marriage ceremony was performed by his brother, Cicero D., who was a Justice of the Peace. He first settled on a farm in Cobb County near Lost Mountain, where he resided for about four years. He then moved to Paulding County, near the town of Hiram, where he resided until his death on February 6, 1902.


To them were born six children: Louis Anthony, born December 12, 1856, and married Miss Sarah J. Hipps. Robert Toombs, born June 8,1858, and married Miss Ella Land. Mary, born October 19, 1859, and married John A. Clonts. Harriet re, born November 29,1860. Saphronia Frances, October, 1862, married John T. Lester. John William, born August 12,1866, and married Miss Eunice Sorrells December 28, 1904.


John Frances enlisted as a private in Company 1., Second Georgia Cavalry, Confederate army, in May, 1862, at Kennesaw, (then Big Shanty,) Cobb County, Georgia, and known at that time as Camp McDonald. His command remained at that place about one month after his enlisted then went to Atlanta and was one of the guards of the Anderson Raiders, when they were executed in the summer of 1862. Soon after this his command was ordered to Tennessee, where they joined General Kirby Smith's command about July 10, 1862. About three days later he was in the first battle of Murfreesboro, when General Crittendon's entire army was captured. The artillery captured in this battle was afterwards used by the Confederate army and was known as "White's Battery."


Soon after this, his command marched toward Nashville and camped in the Sequatchie Valley. He was sent out one Sunday morning to relieve some pickets, and through mistake he took the wrong road, and very unexpectedly found himself in the presence of two Union soldiers, who forced him to surrender. This occurred about eight miles from Nashville on the Nashville and Luverne turnpike, about the last of August, 1862. He remained a prisoner of General Burnside's for only a few days, until General Burnside ordered him carried to Nashville, to be sent to a Federal prison. On the way to Nashville he was guarded by two soldiers, and they came to a fine spring on the roadside where they stopped to get some water and to rest. Soon after they stopped John F. Moon lay down and began to snore as though he were asleep. In a little while the two guards were snoring in reality. He got up and escaped. Before doing so, however, he said that it was very hard to resist the temptation to slay his guards. Knowing as I do his intense hatred for the Yankees, I can well imagine how hard it was for him to overcome this temptation, and only the fact that he considered his recapture almost certain, and in that event it meant death to him, was all that saved the lives of his guards. A few days spent in wandering around in an unknown country try where there were plenty of Yankee soldiers, he made good his escape, but it took him several days to again reach his command.


He rejoined them at Woodsonville, Kentucky, about the middle of September. In going back to his command he illustrated his devotion to duty and loyalty to the South, and showed the grit and courage of the true soldier, for we can well imagine that when he escaped from his captors and realized that his command was hundreds of mile away, he knew not where, and how he must have yearned to see his wife and five little children down in Georgia. For he loved them, never was there a father more devoted to his wife and children the he. A weak man would have found the excuse, while he was separated from his command, to have visited his home and family, but like the true soldier that he was, he thought of nothing but duty and did it by returning to his command.


When he rejoined his command he was under General Nathan B. Forrest, and soon after reaching his command a battle was fought at this place which lasted thirty-six hours, when the Union army surrendered. He was in the battle at Perryville, Kentucky, which lasted three days. At Camp Dick Robertson they captured and burned the government supplies. They then came back into Tennessee, and he was in the second battle of Murfreesboro. In this battle he fought for fourteen days without taking the saddle from his horse except to arrange the blanket; then fought the Union army all the way to Chattanooga, from Chattanooga across the river to Trenton, Dade County, Georgia, and was in the battle Chickamauga until he was captured about August 27, 1863.


After his capture he was carried to Camp Douglas at Chicago, where he remained until he was paroled at the end of the war. While he was a prisoner he suffered a great deal from hunger and cold. The climate being very cold in winter they were not allowed to have any fire, and were furnished with but little clothing. He stated that many prisoners starved to death. He told of an incident that was both humorous and pathetic, but it shows the hardships they endured: One of the prison officers came into the prison with a dog, he lost it and it was never able to find him. The officer was very much troubled about the loss of his dog, and was instituting a very vigorous search for him when one of the prisoners pasted on the prison-wall: "For the want of meat the dog was eat."


He and his wife joined the Primitive Baptist church at Harmony Grove many years before their death, and were baptized by is brother, Isaac N. Moon. He lived an humble Christian life, and death to him was a welcome visitor.


ISAAC N. MOON

ISAAC N. MOON was born in Walton County, Georgia, on April 11, 1832. He was married twice; the first time to Miss Cynthia Bullard, of Cobb County and to them were born eight children, six boys and two girls. After the death of his first wife, he married Mrs. Maggie Daniel, of Cobb County. He resided in Cobb County from the time of his first marriage until his death. On account of his being a physician, he did not enlist in the Confederate army, but remained at home to administer to those who remained at home. He joined the Primitive Baptist church at Sorrell Springs church, in Cobb County, in 1872, and was at this time ordained to preach the gospel, which he did as long as he lived when the condition ion of his health would permit. He represented Cobb County in lower the house of the Georgia Legislature during the years 1886-7.


LUCY ELLEN MOON

LUCY ELLEN MOON was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 3, 1834. She married W. M. Bullard, of Cobb County, and to them were born eight children, as follows: J. T. Bullard, born November 5, 1858, and married Miss Sarah Fuller. R. G. Bullard, born 15, 1860, and married Miss Elva Ada Ward. N. L. Bullard, born December 27, 1861. William M. Bullard, Jr., born April 3,1866, and married Miss Arrie Howington. Sarah C. Bullard, born November 10, 1867, and married J. P. Powell. F. M. Bullard, born May 17, 1875, and married Miss Lessie Bullard. B. M. Bullard born September 27, 1877, and married Miss Martha M. Wyatt. Idle Bullard was born February 27, 1880; died May 5, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Bullard resided on a farm in Cobb County until they moved to Bremen, Haralson County, where they resided until their death.


W.W.L. MOON

W. W. L. MOON, (known as Lump ,) was born in Walton County December 24, 1835, and married Miss Milza Webb. He enlisted as a private in Company I., Second Georgia Cavalry, Confederate army, and died while in military service. On the morning of March 30, 1863, he was found dead in camp by his mess-mate and brother-in-law, William M. Bullard. He was not well the evening before, and was thought that he had, through mistake, taken an overdose of morphine, which caused his death. His widow married William Brown, of Walton County, and them were born three children, Wiley, Luther and Sallie. Wiley married Minnie Black and Sallie married Cash Moon.


STEPHEN C. MOON

STEPHEN C. MOON was born in Cobb County, Georgia, on August 7, 1841. He never married. He enlisted as a private in Company D., Seventeenth Regiment, Confederate army, and was in the battle of Mannassas and had measles at the time he was forced to wade a creek or river, which caused a relapse of measles and pneumonia, from which he died on July 30, 1863. All the children of John Willingham Moon were prosperous and accumulated enough property to place them in easy circumstances. All owned substantial homes, and all who did not belong to the Primitive Baptist church were believers in that faith and order.


JOHN WILLIAM MOON

JOHN WILLIAM MOON, (better known as Jack Moon,) was born in Spaulding County, Georgia, August 12, 1866. He attended the country schools until he was 18 years old, then taught school one year and attended a business college in Atlanta in 1886. In 1887 he began as clerk in a general store at Hiram, Ga., where I worked for seven years; read law at night, and was admitted to the bar at Dallas, Ga., in August, 1892, and practiced law for a few years and then went in to the dry goods business at Hiram. He followed this for five years, then went into the hardware business and was engaged in this business for several years. On December 28, 1904, he was married to Miss Eunice E. Sorrells, of Spaulding County, Ga., and to them were born four children, to-wit: Christine Saphronia, born October 31, 1905. Lorraine Sorrells, born February 10, 1908. Mildred Virginia, born April 19, 1911, and Jack Bennett, the baby.


The subject of this sketch was a son of John F., and Saphronia (Adcock) Moon; his grandfather and grandmother were John Willingham and Harriet (Cole) Moon; his great-grandfather and great-grandmother were Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon. His great-great-grandfather and great-great-grandmother were Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon.


MADISON MOON

MADISON MOON, son of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) [Moon, and grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born on October 30, 1815, and married Miss Mary Richardson. By this union they had seven children: Rollie, who married Arbel Moon, of Cobb County; John and William, who lived in Texas, and three others who died quite young. Amy married Andrew J. words, of Walton County, in 1859. They had born unto them nine children: Mary E., John M., Fannie W., William H., James T., A. F., Annie, Carry B., and Sallie W. Mr. Swords was reared on the farm and received a good education under the tutorship of professor Robert A. Gwinn, one of the best teachers of his time. In 1862 he enlisted in Company D., (Captain W. D. Grant,) Second Georgia Cavalry, and with his command participated in many important battles, among them being Murfreesboro, (first and second battles;) Perryville, with the command that drove the Union forces from Lookout Point; Chickamauga, New Hope church and Waynesboro, where he had his horse shot from under him. After the war e came home very poor, but by hard work and economy he has become the owner of a 400-acre tract of good land, had a comfortable home and the respect and esteem of his fellow-citizens. He was Justice of the Peace in the 417th District G. M., Walton County, for a number of years, and was a master Mason, belonging D the F. and A. M. Lodge at Loganville. Mr. Moon, after the death of his first wife, was married to Miss Margaret Caloway, and by his union they had born unto them only thirteen children: Marth Ann who was married twice, the first time to Kerney Eubanks, and be second time to William Gresham, of Gwinnett County, who she now survives. By the first marriage they had born unto them eight children: Asa, who married a Cannon the first time and second time, by whom they had six children. Lizzie, who David Smith, eight children. Sidney, married Lizzie Cannon , three children. Clark, Annie Lee and Minnie. Nancy married Robert Bennett, they had four children, Cora Lee, Alline, Jewel and Alice. William married Janie Wells, they had two children, Vernon and Birdie. Lula married Mark Sanders, they had seven children Myrtis and Curtis, Clarence, Ethel, Sarah, Clyde, and one died in infancy. Jesse married Annie Johnson and had four children, Grover, Arthur, James and Cramer. Mary Jane married Tom Smith the first time and William Harper the second time. They had one child, Thomas. Nancy married Non Braswell, to whom were born seven children. Briney married J. B. Swords. Charlie married Mattie Batchelor. Augustus married Emma Beachum. Sandy married John Hawkins. James married Mamie Stephens. Elijah married Evie Stephens. Angie married Columbus Bennette. Henry married Belle Mann. Callie married Jessie Baker. Warnie married Lizzie Gresham.


Mr. Moon had just twenty children in all, and they all married in good families and are all doing well. The most of them are good farmers and make good crops from year to year. At the time of his death, about 1897, he had a great number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He fought in the Creek Indian wars. He owned a large farm and operated a great deal of machinery. He was a master Mason.


LEWIS MOON

LEWIS MOON, son of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) was born in Walton County, Georgia, and married Miss Katie Webb. They had born unto them several children, the names of all I know are Jack, Woodson and Cash. He owned a good farm and raised fine crops. He was a master Mason and belonged to the F. and A. M. Lodge at Loganville.


PATTIE MOON

PATTIE MOON, daughter of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, and was married to James Webb. By this union were born several children. I will give the names of those that I know: Andrew, who is a minister of Primitive Baptist church; Wiley, John, James Jr., and Elizabeth. Mr. Webb was a farmer and a minister of the gospel of the Baptist faith, and preached for many years. John, his second son, moved Louisiana in 1890.


BETSIE MOON

BETSIE MOON, daughter of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, and was married to Augustus Clay, to whom were born several children, among them being Augustus, Jr., Dollie, who married a Lester the first time and second time to George W. Moon, her cousin; Henry C., who married Susan Graham, daughter of David Graham.


RACHAEL MOON

RACHAEL MOON, daughter of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, was either born in Columbia or Walton County, and married to Jack Griffin, and to them were born the following children: Jesse Thomas and John. John married Miss Fannie Willingham. Laura, who married a Irwin. Sandy, who was never married. Nancy, who married a Baker. Sallie, who married a Wallis. Creasy, who married Sam Needham. Rebecca, who married Jack Needham. Rachael, who married Bill Lyle.


AMY MOON

Amy MOON, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, and married Buck Richardson. By this union they had born unto them the following children. Rollie, Billie, James, Grover, Malchai, Edom, Thomas and Joseph, all of whom raised large families. Billie moved to Ala.1881. I do not know who these children married. Later I have been informed that they had fifteen children. Mary, who married Madison Moon, her first cousin. The subject of this sketch good woman and lived to be eighty or ninety years old.


LEWIS MOON

LEWIS MOON, son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1876, and married Miss Martha Willingham in 1806. By this union was born unto them nine children, as follows: Javus, John, and Mommon B., who married Elizabeth Austin. To them were born six children: Lewis, Martha, John, Margaret, Jesse, Morgan and Bev, who lives in Texas.


He served two terms in the Georgia Legislature and one term in the Senate, when the capital was at Milledgeville. His mode of traveling to and from the seat of government was on horseback. He also held the office of Justice of the Peace for twenty years.


Mommon B. Moon was a very fine scribe; he could not be excelled. He taught writing schools all over the country. He also was a fine mathematician. The other children of Lewis Moon are: Lewis, Jr., Isaac, Jesse, Martha, Mary, and one died in infancy.


MARY ANN MOON

MARY ANN MOON, daughter of Lewis Moon, was born October 6, 1839, and was married to John B. Rodgers on April 8 1855. There were born unto them seven children, as follows Lewis J., William R., Martha M., Elizabeth S., John E., James R. and Isaac L.


John B. Rodgers, husband of Mary Ann, was a farmer and followed the occupation for many years, when he was permanently disabled by an accident. Since his death his widow has been living with her son, James R., at Tucker, Ga. He is a successful merchant at that place.


THOMAS MOON

THOMAS MOON, son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon was born in Columbia County, Georgia. I don't know when he married, who he married nor how many children he had. Can give the names of six, as follows: Jabez, James, Lewis, Levi, Bookout and Charley.


EDOM MOON

EDOM MOON, son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1784. I do not know who he married. He had twelve or fifteen children, but I can only give some of their names: Daniel, William, Edom, Jr., Mary, Sarah, Martha and Pattie. The subject of this sketch was a farmer. He and his brother, Joseph, were very much devoted to each other, and both of them were great singers They would very often meet and sing together.


PATTIE MOON

PATTIE MOON, daughter of Edom Moon, was born March 16, 1818, and married Josiah Brooks on October 15, 1866, and had several children: Jane O., who married Josh Still on October 15,1866, and had six children, Jennie, Mattie, Sallie, Samp, Joe and Lumb.


EDOM MOON, Jr.

EDOM MOON, Jr., son of Edom Moon, Sr., was born in Walton County, Georgia, in the year 1830, and moved with his father to Walker County, Georgia, where he still resides, and is 90 years of age. The following is a letter I have in my possession that he wrote to my father 68 years ago:


Walker County, Georgia, June 4, 1852.


Dear Cousin LaFayette:--I received your communication in due time and have not had time to respond until now. We are all well at present and hoping these few lines may find you all enjoying the same like blessings, as health is the best thing that was ever bestowed on man. We may have all this world's goods and if we don't have health we cannot enjoy it. I have nothing of great importance to write to you at present. The wheat crop will be cut short on account of the frost. The oat crop is very good. We have had a lot of rain, could not plow for a week or two. Father and mother send their best respects to Uncle Joseph and Aunt Martha. They expect to be in Walton between now and Christmas. S. L., I expect to be in Walton by October. I want to see all of my old Walton friends once more. You must write in reply to this. Are you not married yet? I expect you are most ready to jump the broom. I am not married yet and do not know when I shall, so nothing more at present. I remain,


Your loving cousin until death,


EDOM G. W. MOON.


JABEZ MOON

JABEZ MOON was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1833, married to Miss Isabel Clark. By this union they had born unto them nine children: Thomas E., born March 19, 1854 and was married three times, the first time to Miss Eliza Wingate the second time to Miss Lizzie Poole, and the third time to Bettie Jones and had seven children.


William I., was born May 15, 1857 and married Feller Edwards and had seven children.


James Berry was born July 3, 1858, and married Miss Callie Poole; eight children


Lizzie was born in February, 1860, and married B. Wallis; they had four children. Robert M., was born in October 1862, and was married to Miss Mandy Knight, and had seven children. Anna was born in 1864, and was married to Frank Berry, they have five children. Albert A., was born in 1866, and was married to Miss Rosie Sigman, and had three children. Ida was born in June, 1872, and married Hugh Dorsey. They had eight children and Battie E., was born June 13, 1874, and was married to Miss Pinkie Gray and had seven children. Battie has served on the police force in Atlanta, Ga., continuously for twenty years. Jabez Moon, the father of these children, and Isabel, his wife, were strict Baptists.


THOMAS B. MOON

THOMAS B. MOON, son of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, and grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born the 19th of June, 1810, and was married to Miss Emeliann Davis August 12th, 1828. His wife was a daughter of Jefferson Davis. By this union they had born unto them six children, as follows Jesse Benjamin Edom, born February 6, 1830, and die February 11, 1830; William Francis, born December 17, 1831; Woodson Daniel, born February 15, 1833; Elizabeth Sarah, born May 11, 1835; Lydia Ann, born August 7, 1837; Rachael Rebecca born August 6, 1840, and died August 25, 1841.


Thomas Moon was a farmer and after the death of his wife 1844, he was married to Miss Susan Moon, daughter of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon. By this union they had two children, both dying in infancy. After the death of her husband she was married to Willis Irwin, who will be seen in the sketches of Joseph Moon's children.


WOODSON DANIEL MOON

WOODSON DANIEL MOON, son of Thomas B., and Emeliann (Davis) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on February 15, 1833, and was married to Miss Charlotte Ann Hammock, daughter of Asa Hammock, December 24, 1854. By this union they had six children, as follows: Mary Lewis, born October 10, 1855, and died March 9, 1856; Pocahontas, born December 5, 1856, and died November 6, 1858; Benjamin Franklin born September 7, 1855; Hilmon, born April 11 1860; Albert S. J., born April 2, 1862; Sarah Ann born October 24, 1863.


Mr. Moon lived in Walton County, Georgia, and was a good men He enlisted in the Confederate army in 1863, in Company 35th Georgia Regiment. He made a true soldier and served until he was killed in the battle of Hanover Junction, Va., May 23, 1864 The following is a copy of a letter that he wrote to his wife while in service:


"Camp Near Orange Courthouse, Va., Sept. I 1, 1863.


My Dear Charlotte:


"I this morning seat myself to drop you a few lines which leaves me in tolerable good health at this time. I hope these imperfect lines may come to hand and find you and the children all well and doing well. Anything you want you had as well buy it if have the money, as I don't expect the money will be any good in a short time from this, for there is so much of it afloat and it buys such a little. If you go to buy anything you will have to give measure of money for a measure of anything you buy. You may what money you please, and live as well as you can, for that is hat is allotted to man in this world, and you had as well enjoy for to lay it up and let it go down on your hands, which it undoubtedly will do.


"The army here is in good health at this time, but is small. companies will not average more than thirty-five men, and that makes the regiment about 350 men, and four regiments make a brigade It is thought here that this corps, or Ewell's, will go west. Longstreet's corps is done gone. If A. P. Hill's corps goes it will in a few days. Times are very hard here now; things are so and the men are so tired of meat and bread that they will pay any price that is asked. They have to pay from fifteen to twenty dollars per bushel for Irish potatoes, one dollar a pound for dried fruit and two dollars a plug for tobacco, and everything else in proportion.


"I have written to Hill what things I wanted. If Andrew Webb bring them. I don't need a coat and jacket, the ones I have will last me this winter, and it will be of no use to send such things will not need, for if I have to move I will have to throw them away. The shoes that I have would do to wear in dry weather if they were half-soled. If you have the leather I want you to send me two half-soles and I will put them on myself.


"I will close for the present, for I have to sit flat on the ground and write on my knee. Write soon, for it has been over a month since I heard from you. I remain your ever-loving husband u until death. When this you see remember me, though seven hundred miles between us be.


"W. D. MOON."


"Camp Near Orange Courthouse, Va., December 10, 1863.


"Dear Wife and Children:


"I this morning seat myself to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am still in the land and among the living. I am in tolerably good health at this time, hoping these lines may come safely to hand and find you all likewise. I received your letter of the 30th of November by J. R. Thomas on yesterday and was glad to hear from you and to learn that you are well and doing well. I received some little articles from you and we stewed up the fruit today and baked some pies. I took the best "bait" I have had since I have been in Virginia, for I was tired of one diet all the time. I have craving appetite for something nourishing. We have had a hard time from the 27th of November to the 2nd of December. Yankees crossed the Rapidan on the 26th in force which we had to meet. They crossed at Ely's Ford, about twenty miles below this place and about ten miles above Chancellorsville, and there we them and fortified against them and remained in line of battle five days and nights in five hundred yards of the Yankee pick and in the coldest weather that I ever saw, in an old field and no wood to burn. As to my part, I shivered the worst that I ever did in my life, but the Yankees took a hint and left the night before we intended to attack them the next morning, and I don't think there were many that cared. As to my part, I did not, for I was not anxious to engage them, for they had five corps while we had two, but if they would have stayed till the next morning we would have tried them.


"I am awfully tired of this war and would like the best in the world to be at home, but I see no chance for me to get there. I would give my interest in the Confederacy to be relieved of it, for we are whipped, anyway, for I see no chance for us to hold our own, for our army is growing weaker everyday and we have no course to go to, while the Yankees have plenty; they have the world open to them, and if we can whip them we can whip the world. I understand that the Yankees are recruiting in New York at the rate of fifteen thousand a week of foreigners. If that he the case I can't see how we are to hold our own.


"Give my respects to all inquiring friends. No more at present. I remain your loving husband until death.


"W. D. MOON."


ELIZABETH SARAH MOON

ELIZABETH SARAH MOON, daughter of Thomas B., and Emeliann (Davis) Moon, and grand-daughter of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, was born May 11, 1835, and was married to Thomas Jefferson Moon. She was a first cousin to her husband. To them were born five children. Thomas Jefferson Moon was a son of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, as will be seen in the sketches of Jesse Moon's children. He enlisted as a private in Company B., 41st Georgia Regiment of the Confederate army and served till the close of the war. He settled on a farm in Cobb County and resided there until his death in 1889.


LYDIA ANN MOON

LYDIA ANN MOON, second daughter of Thomas B. and Emeliann (Davis) Moon, was born in Walton count, Georgia, August 7, 1837, and was married to Gip Bullard, of Cobb County, Georgia. To them were born several children, among them being Woodson D., Willis, Lizzie (Bullard) Paris, wife of Joseph S. Paris; Mrs. John Catchcart, of Atlanta, Ga.


To realize the close relationship existing between the children of Mrs. Bullard and the descendants of John W. Moon, we must bear in mind that Mrs. Bullard was a first cousin of John F. Moon and his brothers.


BENJAMIN FRANKLIN MOON

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN MOON, son of Woodson D., and Charlotte (Hammock) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, September 7, 1858, and was married to Miss Sudie Almand, daughter of H. P. Almand, of Rockdale County, Georgia. By this union they had born unto them only one child, it dying in infancy. After his marriage he moved to Jackson, Butts County, Georgia, where he resided until his death. He was mayor of the City of Jackson for several terms. After the death of his wife he was married to a Mrs. Fretwell. He died June 15, 1911.


HILMON ALLEN MOON

HILMON ALLEN MOON, son of Woodson D., and Charlotte (Hammock) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 11, 1860, and was married to Miss Lula Almand, daughter of H. P. Almand, of Conyers, Rockdale County, Georgia. By this union they had born unto them two children, as follows: Beulah Ann, born October 2, 1884, and married Les Hollingsworth; H. C., born April 20, 1886, and married Miss Orrie Cornwell. Mr. Moon lived in Rockdale County until his death. He owned a very fine farm and was a good neighbor and citizen. After the death of his wife he married a Mrs. Darter. After this marriage Mr. Moon's health failed, he was compelled to go on crutches for long time, and from the crutches to the rolling chair, and finally he was confined to his bed several years before he died with paralysis.


ALBERT SIDNEY JOHNSTON MOON

ALBERT SIDNEY JOHNSTON MOON, son of Woodson D, and Charlotte (Hammock) Moon; his paternal grandparents were


Thomas B., and Emeliann (Davis) Moon; was born in Walton County Georgia, April 2, 1862, and was married to Miss Kernelia Peek, daughter of Mr. J. H. and Mrs. Jennie (Chandler) Peek, on ember 15, 1886. By this union they had born unto them twelve children, as follows: David F., born October 29, 1887, and mar


Miss Rosie Hutson, and after her death was married to her sister,, Fannie; Charlotte, born January 26, 1889, and died in infancy


Henry A., born April 16, 1890, and married Miss Rosie Stephenson b by this union had three children. Parrie Sadie, born November 17, 1891, and married J. J. Stephenson, Jr., son of Rev. J. Stephenson; by this union they had one child, Sadie Joe. Bobbie W., born October 2, 1893, and died September 2, 1912. Asa M., born February 9, 1896; Mattie Julia, born January 25, 1898; William, born July 9, 1899; Leora, born September 22, 1901; Kernelia Opal, born April 16, 1903; Annie Pearl, born April 22, 1906, died January 6, 1919; Sidney Idus, born August 2, 1907.


Mr. Moon is a farmer of the modern type. By industry and economy he now owns a 400-acre tract of land in Walton County, Georgia He believes in making his farm self-sustaining, by raising everything that he consumes that can be produced on the farm and that quantity for sale. He owns one of the best all-round farms in the county. He has built one of the best and handsomest country homes in Walton County and has recently installed water works and electric lights, which add to the comfort of the home. He is giving all his children a college education. Mr. Moon has a large collection of old relics that has been handed down from his grand-father's father-in-law, Jesse H. Davis. Among them is a fifty-dollar I issued by the United States Government in 1779; a desk and wardrobe that are over one hundred and twenty-five years old.


The following is a copy of an old letter I found while looking over the old papers written by Mrs. Davis:


"Walton County, Ga., May 30, 1823.


"Dear Children: I take this opportunity to let you know that we are all reasonably well at present, hoping that these few lines will find you all well and doing well. My dear children, I long to hear from you all. I have not heard from you since I saw you, which causes me to be very uneasy at times, but I thought you would have written to me before this time to let me know how you are and how Jackson got home and whether he has been to the north or not, and how you and Jabez have made it. "The Lord has blessed us with good seasons and prosperous crops at this time for which I feel very grateful for and all other blessings that He bestows upon us. My dear children, it is not known to us whether we shall ever see each other again in this world. O ! my children ! seek thy Creator in the days of thy youth, before the days come hastening on when you shall say, My days are gone. My dear children, try to pray to the Lord that he would show you the worth of your poor immortal souls, and pray for me, that I may be found at the throne of mercy, ever pleading for your and my poor souls, that the Lord would keep us from sinning while in this world, and that he would fit and prepare us for a better world, where sin and sorrow is no more. "Remember me to Mr. and Mrs. Phillips; tell them I have not forgotten them and hope that I never will. Farewell,


"ELIZABETH DAVIS."


SARAH ANN MOON

SARAH ANN MOON, daughter of Woodson D., and Charlotte (Hammock) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, October 21, 1863, and was married to Thomas Smith, and by this union they had seven children, as follows: Cordell, Woodson, Jr., Florence, Buna, Levi, Willis and Homer. Most of these children are married and have families. Mr. Smith owns a fine farm in Gwinnett County, Georgia, where he raised and educated his children, after which he moved to Grayson, of the same County, where he now resides.


JOSEPH MOON

JOSEPH MOON, youngest son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, October 16, 1796, and was married to Edith Hutson about the year 1824, and by this union they were blessed with four children: William E., Creasy, Susie and Thomas. He married Martha Jones in 1833, and by this union they had fourteen children: Stephen, LaFayette, Joseph, DeKalb, George W., Catherine, Andrew J., Josephine, Augustus J., Edom T., Charles K. P., Sarah E., Franklin Pierce, Jesse L., Columbus and Martha.


At the age of 75 he married the third time, to Luranie Thompson, and lived with her nearly twenty-three years. By his first two wives he had eighteen children, and none by his last wife. At his death, May 30, 1893, he had eighteen children, one hundred grandchildren, one hundred and seven great-grandchildren, and ten great-great-grandchildren.


Joseph Moon was a prosperous planter, owning many slaves. He moved to Walton County in 1819 and was a man greatly beloved for his amiable disposition and hospitality. In 1844 he sold his farm at Gum Creek church and bought two hundred and eighty acres from his brother, Jesse, near Sharon Baptist church, it being all in original forest but twelve acres. He built a log cabin and moved there and lived there fifty-three years till he died.


The following is the copy of the deed to this tract of land which will show the consideration at that time of one of the best farms in Georgia:


GEORGIA ---- Walton County:


"This indenture made and concluded this twentieth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, between Jesse Moon and Joseph Moon, both of the county and state first above written.


"Witnesseth, That the said Jesse Moon, for and in consideration of the sum of four hundred and seventy-five dollars, to him in land paid by the said Joseph Moon before the sealing and delivering of these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, hath granted bargained, sold, and cloth by these presents grant, bargain, sell and convey unto the said Joseph Moon, his heirs and assigns forever, a certain tract or parcel of land, situated, lying and being in the Fourth district of Walton County, Georgia, and known and distinguished in the plan of survey by the number two hundred and fifty-two (252) with the exception of a certain part of said lot which is deeded to the deacons of Sharon church, also a part of lot number two hundred and fifty-one (251) and a part of lot number two hundred and sixty-eight (268), the part transferred in this deed of the two last named lots, is now under fence and the fence considered the line, except a small part of lot number two hundred and fifty-one (251) which about one acre not enclosed and adjoining the northeast corner of the lot whereon Thomas Butner now resides, and number 269; to have and to hold the said tract or parcel of land, together with all and singular, the rights, members and apt purtenances thereto belonging unto the said Joseph Moon, his heirs and assigns and to his and their own proper use, benefit and be hoof forever in fee simple, and the said Jesse Moon cloth warrant and forever defend the aforesaid tract or parcel of land and premises from the claim or claims of himself, his heirs and assigns, and against the claim or claims of any and all other persons whatsoever. In testimony whereof, I, the said Jesse Moon, have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the day and year first written.


"Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of Jesse Moon


"Charles L. Bookout.


A. B. WHITHEAD, J. P.


"Recorded in Book P., Page 466. W. W. Nowell, Clerk."


Mr. Moon was an active Baptist for years, a Justice of the Peace for twenty years; he was an ardent Democrat and voted for every Democratic presidential candidate from Andrew Jackson to and including Grover Cleveland's last election. He, with his grandson, (the author of this book,) marched up to the polls together where grandfather cast his last vote for a president and I cast my first. Several remarked that this would elect Cleveland, and sure enough it did. I remember when he was ninety years old I was picking cotton for him one day when it was threatening rain; he not having any basket, got a washtub and picked twenty pounds in an hour. He was a very stout and active man for that age; he could saddle his pony and mount it as spry as a boy. A few years before his death he was seen on a building nailing on shingles.


He had eight sons and one grandson in the Civil War at the same time and all returned but one, Andrew J., who was killed on the battlefield in 1864.


The following is a copy of an article that Thomas Giles, ordinary of Walton County, wrote for the Atlanta Constitution:


"Editor Constitution: To honor the spirit of patriotism of the family of Joseph Moon, one of the purest men that ever made his home in this or any other state of this union and which deserves recognition in a public manner, I ask that you publish for the inspiration of the youth of other times the following facts, touching the military services of this family in the late Civil War.


"Joseph Moon was a citizen of Walton County from its early organization and raised a large family of boys and girls, under the discipline practiced in our earlier times. They grew up to be men and women of heroic mold; eight of the boys and one grandson enlisted in Dr. W. S. Barrett's company, G., 35th Georgia regiment, on its organization in 1861, under the command of Col. Ed. Thomas, and afterwards made brigadier general in Wilcox's division and A. P. Hill's corps, army of Northern Virginia. "These young scions of noble lineage served continuously, through all the campaigns of that immortal army until death or permanent disability, down to the surrender at Appomattox. "The following is a list of the names of the soldiers: William E., Stephen L., Joseph D., George W., Andrew J., Augustus J., Edom T., Charles K. P., and Thomas M., (grandson.) All of these were citizens of Walton County, virtuous, industrious, law-abiding and reasonably successful in their vocations, and the same can be said of their descendants to this generation. Many of these still reside with us, and others have sought other fields to fill the measure of their ambition and usefulness.


"THOMAS GILES,


"Walton County, Ga., June 12, 1915."


The subject of this sketch came of vigorous stock, he and his paternal parents showing some remarkable instances of longevity. His rule for happiness and long life was "to live right and love your wife dearly, as nothing is as happy as true love."


Among his possessions was an old Bible that had been in the family for over one hundred and fifty years. Mr. Moon's father failed, for some reason, to place the date of the month on he was born on the family record, but happened to be digging potatoes on that day, and when Joseph grew to be a man he would celebrate as his birthday the day that he dug his potatoes. When anyone would ask him how old he was he would say, I'll be so-in-so on potato-digging time. In later years he adopted October as his birthday.


At the time of his death he was the oldest citizen in Walton County. He always said that he wanted to die in the daytime and on May 30, 1893, one bright morning just after sunrise, he peacefully passed into the great beyond, after a long and happy life, at the ripe old age of 96 years, 7 months and 14 days.


I cannot conclude this chapter without mentioning his second wife, Martha (Jones) Moon. This great and noble woman deserves space in this book, and all who knew her personally, I am sure bear me out in this statement.


She was born August 12, 1812, a daughter of Stephen Jones of Morgan County, Georgia. All who knew her knew nothing but to love her. She numbered her friends by the scores. She was an active member of the Baptist church, and was truly a good wife and mother; true to her husband, true to her fourteen children, and true to her neighbors and friends.


She was one of the best midwives in the whole country, almost equal to any practicing physician. She would go far and near to the numerous calls. Although being a large fleshy woman, winch received a call, would mount her horse and go in a sweeping gallop.


On November 22, 1871, she died with heart dropsy, at the of 59 years, 3 months and 10 days. She had fulfilled her mission on earth and was ready to go when she was called from a state of action into the heavenly rest. Just imagine the cares and anxiety of this mother, the cares of her large family, the prayers and anxiety for her eight sons that were in the army, those loving hands that so gently prepared clothing to send them that they may be comfortable. The anguish of heart she must have had when the news came that one of them had fallen on the field of honor. It has been truly said that this was a good woman; she was not only missed in the home but by the entire community.


Now a few words about one of Joseph Moon's slaves. He had hat was very foolish. When slavery was abolished this one was on his hands. He was better known as "Old Vence;" the palate his mouth was down on his tongue and he could not talk with distinction; his feet and hands had been severely burned, but could help some around the house, such as watering the mules, cows and a number of other things. He delighted in driving a steer to a cart. You could always see a pile of walking sticks, ox yokes and pine knots in one corner of his cabin. If he was five miles from home and came across some pine knots he would gather his arms full and carry them home. I will try to give some of his language as he muttered it: "Ou goo goo ik oke ike, ake no ou yank ker yank ou nou." He thought there was no one like my father. When anyone would be picking at him they would tell him to jump on me and give me a flogging, and he would say, "Noo noo ak at oy ak ate oy," meaning "No, no, that is Fayette's boy; that is Fayette's boy." He was a great curiosity to everybody that saw him. He was finally sent to the poor-house, where he died.


WILLIAM E. MOON

WILLIAM E. MOON, farmer, Monroe, Walton County, Georgia; oldest son of Joseph and Edith Hutson) Moon, was, born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1826. His paternal grandparents were Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon. Mr. Moon was reared on the farm and what little schooling he received was obtained at the old time log schoolhouse, with slabs for benches. In 1861 he enlisted in Company G., (Capt. Barrett,) 35th Georgia regiment. With his command he participated in many hard-fought battles, among then were Seven Pines, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He came out of the war with a capital of $13.00 and commenced life anew. He owned 1,150 acres of land, made good crops, and was very prosperous.


Mr. Moon was married December 19, 1844, to Miss Susan Willingham. She was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1828 and was a daughter of Cash and Martha (Moon) Willingham. They had born unto them eleven children: T. M., Fannie, C. L. J., C. A Joseph P., Benjamin F., Stephen Douglas, Robert L., Elizabeth, William E., and Virginia. Virginia died in infancy.


When Mr. Moon married and started out in life he kept house without any chairs. He pulled his fodder and sold part of it and brought chairs. He was a hard working man and used all the economy he could until he got a start.


On May 22, 1902, he went to the pasture for his cow; on reaching the gate one of his sons saw him fall and on reaching him found him to be dead. He died of heart failure, like all the rest of his brothers and sisters. He was a master Mason.


Mr. Moon held onto the old tallow candle for a long time after the invention of the kerosene lamp. One day his brother, Charles came to see him and was agent for a gas burner, which was attached to a lamp. After supper Charles noticed his dim candle, said to him, "William, let me show you how to make a light," and began to make preparations to light it. William replied, "Don't light that thing in here," but Charles paid no attention to him and kept making preparations, and just as he was in the act of lighting it, William stormed out at him, "I tell you not to light that thing here! If you do, I will throw it out in the yard !" So Charles missed a sale. The next morning he showed him a pair of reversible scissors, and showed him how they could be adjusted for a left-handed person, and he said, "Charles, don't you know good and well I would not have a left-handed wife ?" So he missed a sale again. William was a man that kept agents in the middle of the road.


T. M. MOON

T. M. Moon, son of William E., and Susan (Willingham) Moon, was born May 24, 1845, and was married to Miss Mary Needham. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon By this union they had ten children, as follows: W. A., Sarah Jane, Edgar P., Alexander, Nonnie, Henry, Pullman, Clinton, Ludie and Angie. They raised all these children to be grown. Mr. Moon was a good farmer and raised large crops every year. He enlisted in the Confederate army with his father in 1862, in Company G., 35th Georgia regiment, and fought side by side with his father and seven uncles. He was a very witty man and was all the time getting off jokes on someone. He always despised a dude. One day he was standing on the sidewalk in Conyers, when a traveling man drove up in front of one of the stores, driving a fine horse, and with fine kid gloves on and said to Mr. Moon, "Mister, will you please hold my horse a minute?" Mr. Moon then inquired if one could hold him. "Oh, yes, one can manage him alright, sir," said the traveling man. "Well, hold him while you have got a hold him." Mr. Moon quickly replied.


Mr. Moon died June 1 1888. His window is still living at this date (1920) with her daughter, Mrs. Angie Braswell.


Mr. Moon had some fine apple trees loaded w with delicious fruit; he was picking cotton one day in the orchard with his boys when they began to pluck the apples. He cautioned them particularly not to pull them from the trees as it would cause them to drop their fruit the next year. He went to the house to get a drink of water and take a little rest, and upon his return to the orchard he found that the boys had been up in the trees and gnawed the apples off the stems and left the trees full of cores. The next day he carried a bale of cotton to Conyers and settled his account, whereupon the merchant gave him a receipt and a handful of cigars. He lit one and went out into the street puffing it for all it was worth and screaming "Fire!" at the top of his voice. In a few moments a great crowd had gathered about him, inquiring where the fire was. He replied, 'On the end of my cigar.


A short while before his first child was born, Noon Hutson asked him what was he going to name it. He made this reply: if it is a girl I will name it Mary after my wife; if it is a boy I will name it Monroe; but if it is an idiot or a darn fool I shall name it Noon."


FANNIE MOON

FANNIE MOON, daughter of William E., and Susie (Willingham) Moon, was married in 1878 to Thomas Altha. They unto them eight children, as follows: Susie, Ida, who married Lon Milligan; Hassie; J. F., who married Miss Bessie Stroud in 1889, and had nine children, as follows: Mary, Homer, Lizzie, J. F., Lillie, William L., Hettie Rue, Charlie H., and an infant not named; R. A., W. J., Pearce and Dora.


Mrs. Altha died in 1915 and left a host of grandchild.


ROBERT L. MOON

ROBERT L. MOON, seventh son of William E., and Susie (Willingham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1866 was married to Miss Blanche Bawknight, of Saluda, S. C. and by this union they had born unto them seven children; Robert, Leland, Beulah, Nona, Clyde, Rachael and Annie.


Mr. Moon worked his way through school, graduating at the Peabody Institute at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1897. He has made teaching his principal occupation since. In 1901 he was sent to the Philippine Islands as a teacher by the United States Government. He also visited, China, Japan and other places.


After he returned to America he taught school in various places in Georgia.


The following are the other children of William E. Moon: C. L. J., who married Miss Lula Palmer and had six children; C. A., who married Miss Savannah Shaw and had three children, W. B., Hattie and Bessie; J. P. Moon, who married Miss Mary Robertson and had nine children, Rollie R., Fannie, Cora, Golden, Jefferson, Myrtie, and three died in infancy; Benjamin F. Moon, who married Miss Mattie Aycock and had six children, William, Lena, Laura, Erastus, and two died in infancy; S. D. Moon, born January 30,1861, married Miss Mattie Perkins the first time and had one child Louise, and the second time he married Miss Berta Dickinson. Elizabeth, second daughter of William E. Moon, married T. R. Robertson, and they reside in Texas.


WILLIAM E. MOON, Jr.

WILLIAM E. MOON, Jr., youngest son of William E., and Susie (Willingham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, June 8, 1871, and was married to Miss Mary Levie Towler on November 11, 1897. By this union they had five children: Benjamin Robert, born August 9, 1901; Willie Mae, born October 23, 1902; James Ezra, born May 28, 1904; Nina Marie, born September 2, 1908, and Little Joe, born September 1, 1911.


He taught school during his early manhood days. After his marriage he chose farming as his occupation.


DESCENDANTS OF T. M. AND MARY MOON

W. A. MOON, oldest son of T. M., and Mary (Needham) Moon, married a daughter of Lewis Green, of Walton County, and had eight children, as follows: Alma, Furman, Lennie, William H., Frank, Pirkle, Annie and Carl. Janie had three children, James Claude and Elijah.


HILL MOON married Miss Hesta Gresham and had ten children, Lydia, Grady, Clifford, Maggie, Edd, Marion, Myrtie, and three died in infancy.


ALEXANDER MOON was married to Miss Gelilie Gresham, and they had nine children, Luther, James, Jettie, Erastus, Zelma, Huie, Jesse, Bertha, and one died in infancy.


CLINTON MOON married Edna Moon, daughter of C. K P. Moon,, his first cousin, and had born unto them eight children; as follows: Pinkey, Pearlie, Mattie Lee, Flawdie, Elzie, Estelle, Birt and Effie.


PULLMAN MOON had five children, as follows: Mamie, Paul, Nora Lucy R., and Jewel.


ANGIE MOON married Mark Braswell, son of Non Braswell, a they had five children, as follows: Hoke, Blanche, Jonathan, Pullman, and one died in infancy.


NONNIE MOON was married to T. O. Moon, son of C. K. P. Moon They had three children, Zuma, Bertha and Ethel.


CREACY MOON

CREACY MOON, daughter of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, about the year 1828, and was married twice, the first time to a Hammock and the second time to Marion Jacobs, of Gwinnett County. She had no children by either marriage.


When Mr. Jacobs selected her for a second wife, the next thing was how to get started to seeing her. After planning for several days, he hitched up one day and drove down to see what the prospects would be for him. He got up enough courage to drive up to her gate and hollow "Hello!" When she came to the door he said that he had heard that she wanted to sell her home and he had come over to investigate. She replied, "Well, well, I don't know who could have made up that lie and told it." This struck him such a hard blow that he thought he would have to die an old widower; so he drove to a friend's home, ate dinner and got him to go back with him where he made a date with her. He came three times and got her and the home for one dollar and fifty cents, and was as happy as a dead pig in the sunshine. She lived a happy life with him till she died at Grayson, Gwinnett County, in November, 1900.


SUSAN MOON

SUSAN MOON, daughter of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon was born in Walton County, Georgia, February 13, 1830, and was married to Thomas Moon the first time. After his death she married Willis Irwin, son of Christopher Irwin. By this union they ha six children, as follows: F. A., M. C., J. R., Mark, C. B., and Kernelia. Mr. Irwin resided on a farm in Walton County for many years.. In 1878 he moved to Conyers, Rockdale County, Georgia to educate his children and resided there until he died. He had three sons that made lawyers. After his death, Susan, his wife, resided at the old home for several years, then broke up housekeeping and went to live with her daughter, Mrs. W. B. Barrett, at Jersey, Ga., until she died September 9, 1916, at the ripe old age 86 years.


FRANK A. IRWIN

FRANK A. IRWIN, son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin and a grandson of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, was born Walton County, Georgia, October 27, 1862, and was married June 6, 1888, to Miss Mollie Young, daughter of James Young, of Polk County, Georgia. By this union they had five children: Francis D. R., born April 10, 1889; Eugene R., born April 29, 1893; Charles L., born May 19, 1896 Annie Neley, born May 27, 1889, and Mary C., born October 8, 1902.


Mr. Irwin acquired the elements of knowledge in the common schools of the County and when he was grown he worked and paid his way through the high school at Conyers. He then read law with his uncle, Judge David Irwin, of Marietta, Ga., and was admitted to the bar there at the fall term of the court in 1877. After he married he moved to Cedartown, where he practiced his profession until 1901, when he was appointed by Governor Candler as Judge of the City Court of Polk County, which he held for three terms of four years each. He was elected to the judgeship of the Superior Court of the Tallapoosa Circuit in 1918.


He was raised a poor boy and has by a determined will power worked himself up to the position he now holds. By determination he set a stake and worked up to it.


J. R. IRWIN

J R. IRWIN, lawyer and farmer, son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, and grandson of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on December 11, 1854, and was married to Miss Haden Overbay December 11, 1875. By this union they had four children: Irene, Callie, Howard and Grady.


He, like his brother, worked his way through school and read law under Col. J. N. Glenn, and was admitted to the bar in 1885, and has practiced his profession successfully since.


After the death of his wife in 1900 he married Miss Mary E. Peek November 26, 1903, a daughter of Col. William Peek, of Rockdale County, Georgia. He also owns large farming interests and belongs to the Masonic order. He was at one time mayor of the city of Conyers and filled the office to the entire satisfaction of the city. Everything that he undertakes he goes at it with a determination to win. He is now a candidate for judge of the Superior Court of Stone Mountain Circuit, and the prospects are very good for his election.


MILTON C. IRWIN

Milton C. IRWIN, known as "Tink," son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, was born in Walton County, Georgia. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon. He was married to Miss Mollie Mitchell by whom he had five children, as follows: Clinton, Estelle, Homer, Walter and Ruth. He was a natural-born farmer and a good worker. It seemed that he enjoyed work as much as a hungry man enjoys a good meal.


MARY C. IRWIN

Mary C. Irwin daughter of Willis and Susan ((Moon)) Irwin was born in Walton County, Georgia, January 14. 1861, and was married to W. B. Barrett, son of Dr. Barrett. To them were born five children, as follows: Minnie Eugene, born August 1 7, 1887; Margaret Inez, born November 10, 1888, and was married to Thomas C. Dally April 1 7,1918 and has one child, Thomas Barrett; Myrtie N., born September 22, 1890, and was married to Berry A. Wiley on September 3, 1907, and has three children, Mary N., Louise and Inez; William Irwin, born September 3, 1895; Guy J., born February 7, 1898.


Mr. Barrett by thrift and industry has accumulated considerable property. He owns several hundred acres of good farming land in Walton County and a large interest in the Jersey Oil Mill Co., Jersey, Ga.


MARK D. IRWIN

Mark D. Irwin, son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1864, and was married to Miss Emma Peek, a daughter of Col. William Peek, and have on child, M. D. About the year 1885 he organized the "Solid South," a weekly paper of Rockdale County, Georgia. Later he edited "The Farmers' Alliance," a paper published in Atlanta, Ga. He graduated in the law department of the University of Virginia, after which began the practice of his profession. He served one term in the State Senate from the Thirty-fourth District and made a splendid record.


C. B. IRWIN

C. B. IRWIN, son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin. was born in Walton County, Georgia, on August 15, 1871, and married Miss Miriam Stephenson, daughter of W. J. Stephenson, of Lithonia, De-Kalb County, Georgia. He is a first-class jewel smith and has followed this trade for several years. He was for awhile superintendent of the water works of the city of Conyers, Ga.


THOMAS MOON

THOMAS MOON, son of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon , was born in Walton County, Georgia, about the year 1832. I don't think he was ever married. He went to Texas two or three years before the Civil War and died there two years later.


STEPHEN LAFAYETTE MOON

STEPHEN LAFAYETTE MOON, farmer, Loganville, Walton in County, Georgia, son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, October 28, 1834. His paternal grandparents were Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon.


Mr. Moon was reared on the farm and what little schooling he received was obtained at an old-time log schoolhouse. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G., 35th Georgia regiment. With his command he participated in many hard-fought battles, among them being Seven Pines, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. At the Seven Days' battle he was wounded in the left arm just above the wrist. His rank as an officer was second lieutenant.


Not many days ago I found among his old papers a number of letters written to his parents while he was in the army. The following are copies of a few of them:


"Camp Near Virginia, June 14, 1863.


"Dear Mother: I this morning feel like that I want to write you a few lines as I can't have the pleasure of talking to you. God has begun a good work here among the soldiers, they are coming to Christ daily. The chaplains are doing all in their power to carry the good work. I have seen several baptized. The chaplain of the 49th Ga., went out the other day and baptized thirty-odd. There is a meeting held here every day while we are in line of battle.


"Mother, I have been living dissatisfied for several years. I thought that I wanted to be with the people of God, but I thought that I was not good enough and kept putting it off till yesterday, the 13th of June, and I came out and joined the church and was baptized by the chaplain of the 49th Ga. His name is Mr. Highman We have no chaplain in our regiment.


"Mother, I would like to see you and talk with you. I feel a great deal better satisfied since I joined the church than I did before. I could not be satisfied; my mind was continually wondering about the welfare of my soul hereafter. I have had a change for several years but I could not give up my old ways. Still, I felt like wanted to be with Christians, and from this time I am going to forsake all my evil ways and try to live a Christian life the balance of my days, and I desire to be a member of old Sharon church. The chaplain will send my letter to the church, and I wish I could be there with you all. Hoping to hear from you soon, I remain,


"Your loving son,


"S. L. MOON."


Camp Near Virginia, June 15, 1863.


"Mr. J. W. Webb: I desire to become a member of Sharon church and am sending you my letter to be presented to the church for I feel that I am tired of living outside of the church. I have been baptized by the chaplain of the 49th Georgia Regiment. I would like to be there with you all and hear the prayers of the church. I hope to return to see you all some day, God being my helper, and if it is God's will that I should not live to meet you all in this world, I hope that I will meet you all in heaven, where parting is known no more. I want you all to remember me in your prayers while I am away from you. I find that God is here as we as there, for He is converting many souls here. You will hand my letter as soon as possible.


"Yours in Christ,


"Lieut. STEPHEN L. MOON.


"Camp Near Brandy Station, Va., October 20.


"Dear Father and Mother: I again have the pleasure of dropping you a few lines. This leaves myself and all my brothers well and hearty. I have nothing that is good to write you all at this time, more than we have got this far back from another campaign We have been near Mannassas and drove the Yankees from the Rappohanock river to Mannassas, and they did not stop to give any fight, only the cavalry, as we would push on them so close that they could not get away without making the attempt, till we were in two or three miles of Mannassas. Then we had ten brigades of infantry engaged. We then fell back across the Rappohanock river, burning the railroad bridge as we went. I think we will take up winter quarters some where near where we did last winter, if we don't go west. It is the chat here now that three divisions of this army will go west and General Lee will go also and leave Hill and Ewell here to defend Virginia


"I think if Lee goes with his men he will show the western boys how to fight and would drive the last Yankee back on their own soil. I heard today that Bragg was still fighting them and they were still falling back. I also heard that the Yankees said that as soon as our men charged them they knew that some of the army from the Potomac was there for they did not fight like the troops they had been used to fighting. I don't think there will be any more fighting here this winter----think we can go into winter quarters and remain there unmolested this winter.


"Mother, I would like for you to send me two pairs of socks and a coat, if you can make it. I have a short coat which is too cold for winter. I have pants and shirts aplenty. If you can get them ready, send them by A. J. Webb, or the first one that passes. 1 think that Edom and Augustus need the same.


"The health of the army is very good. Father, I would like for you to send me the returns of the election in Walton. I hope that Lent Bass is elected, but I fear he is left.


"I will close; give my best respects to all my friends. I hope that some of us will get to come home this winter. I suppose that George has not returned to his command yet.


"I remain as ever, your loving son till death.


"S. L. MOON."


I will endeavor to give a sketch of his life as I knew him.


When he came home in April of 1865, after the surrender, he started life anew with nothing but a crippled arm. He taught a three months' school, beginning the 15th of July, 1866. On January 10, 1867, he was married to Anna Elizabeth Cooper, daughter of Noah and Elizabeth (Bonner) Cooper. He began farming, and by hard work and economy he soon had a four-hundred-acre tract of land paid for. This union was blessed with eight children, as follows Edward T., Joseph N., William H., Ida J., Alice E., Sareptha A., Marshall L., and Gordon D. All lived to be grown men and omen.


He was an unpretentious man, never striving to gain what some men call honor, but he lived for God and to do good. He had a great solidity of personal character and possessed the simple faith of an honest man. In word and deed he was a true man; he was true to his God, true to mankind, true to his family and true to himself. He taught his children the standing precept of truth. He loved rugged honesty and truth as much as any man I ever knew and his faith in Christ was as firm as adamantine. He could not understand why all men were not truthful.


It has been said "Death loves a shining mark." In his death that saving has been verified. His life and example are worthy of our emulation, and I am sure that many people are better today for his having lived on earth. Ought not any son be proud of such a father ?


He had been an active member of Sharon Baptist church for fifty years. He attended every service that he was not Providentially kept from, and they were very few. He never shirked a duty and always paid liberally to the church and all other good causes. He was a deacon of the church for years and years and a splendid church worker. A number of men have told me that by his life and influence he had led them to be Christians. At every association or general meeting he was there to represent the church.


When I attended church, of any denomination, upon my return he would ask me where the text was and the next thing you would see him with his Bible. He loved to read his Bible as good as any man I ever saw. The last time I ever visited him in his home in Loganville, he was too feeble to go with me to preaching. When I returned he was sitting on the porch with his Bible, and after asking where here the text was, he showed me a passage of scripture the he had just selected for his funeral, which was second Timothy, 4th chapter, and 6, 7, and 8th verses, which reads as follows: "For am now ready to be offered, and the time of my departure is at hand.


"I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith.


"Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day, and not me only, but unto them also that love his appearing."


This was about ten days before he passed into the area beyond. He realized that the time of his departure was as close at hand and he had made every possible arrangement and was waiting patiently for the summons to come.


On Saturday, March 18, 1911, he passed away with heart failure at the age of 77 years. During all these years he was never ill enough to have a doctor called until a short while before he died. While I was sitting in my home by the fireside with my family, as I heard the telephone ringing, I almost knew that something had happened. After taking the receiver down a message of death flashed over the wire, and as I reached the old home, grief-stricken, I shall never forget the words of consolation from Mrs. Permetus 0'Kelley and others.


The following is a tribute from the lodge of which he was a member:


"Loganville, Ga., April 19, 1911.


"Stephen LaFayette Moon: Tribute from his Lodge, Fergus Lodge No. 135 F. & A. M., to his memory:


"Stephen LaFayette Moon was born in Walton County, Georgia, October 28, 1834, and died at his home in Loganville, Ga., Saturday, March 18, 1911. His wife, Mrs. Anna Elizabeth Moon, Nee Cooper, and several children survive him and mourn his going away One daughter, Mrs. A. O. Cowan, preceded her father to the spirit land. His death was sudden but not unexpected. He had been ill for some weeks, but not confined to his bed. On the day of his death he was able to work about the home. His death was from heart failure. About one o'clock he retired to his room for a little rest, thinking he would sleep a little. On reaching him about 1:30 his wife found him asleep but it was the sleep of death; he breathed only a few times and was gone alone with God and the angels he had spent his last moments.


"Brother Moon gave his heart to God and was baptized by Chaplain J. J. Highman while a soldier in the Civil War. He was faithful member of Sharon Baptist church.


"In the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted in a company from 'Walnut Grove and was a brave defender of his country until the surrender at Appomattox.


"He was made a lieutenant in Company F., 35th Georgia and was in many hard-fought battles, being present when his chieftain, Stonewall Jackson, fell.


"Warned weeks of his approaching, he expressed a modest confidence in the mercy of God and, without alarm waited for death come.


"All who knew him are ready to testify as to his honesty and integrity as a citizen and neighbor. He was one of the oldest members of Fergus Lodge F. & A. M. This inscription is found on the lamb-skin Masonic apron which he has kept through all these years: 'Presented by Fergus Lodge No. 135 F. & A. M., at his iniation. Entered June 28, 1856; passed June 28, 1856; raised July 8, 1856. J. M. McCurdy, W. M.'


"It can be truly said of him, 'He was a Mason.' The evening before his death he gave directions concerning his grave and funeral. He wished the services to be simple, truthful and short. The funeral took place from the Christian church at Loganville, Rev. J. P. McConnell reading the scripture that Brother Moon had selected and offered prayer. He made a short, impressive and appropriate talk and turned the services over to the Masons. In solemn procession his brethren marched by the coffin to the city of the dead Then upon his bier we dropped a tear of love and upon his grave we planted the ever-blooming sprig of acacia.


"With sorrowing hearts we bid him a last farewell. But on some fairer shore 'big and the smiling and the weeping' we shall meet again, meet to part no more.


"Therefore, Be It Resolved, First, That in the church and in Masonry, in the community and in the family circle he will be area greatly missed.


"Resolved, Second, That, inasmuch as we mourn not as those who have no hope, we bow in submission to the Heavenly Grand Master, who has seen fit in His wise providence to remove our brother from the earthly to the heavenly lodge.


"Resolved, Third, That these resolutions be read in open lodge and recorded upon our minutes and a copy be furnished the family and also for publication.


"Signed by Committee: F. M. Watson, Chairman; W. M. Hutchins, L. F. B. Swords, J. H. W. Reed, S. H. Diamond."


Anna E., wife of the deceased, is still living and resides at old home, and is in her eighty-first year. She joined the Method church in her early girlhood days. After her marriage she went the Baptist church where her husband belonged and is an act member. She was good to visit and minister unto the sick. I mother, Elizabeth Cooper, lived to be 85 years old. Her father Noah was killed in the Battle of Atlanta.


EDWARD THOMAS MOON

EDWARD THOMAS MOON, lawyer, LaGrange, Troup County, Georgia, oldest son of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, November 14, 1867. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Marthy (Jones) Moon.


He was reared on the farm and acquired the elements of knowledge in the public schools of Walton County, teaching school during the vacations. From the fall of 189 1 to the spring of 1892 he taught in Loganville. In the fall of 1892 he entered the University of Georgia and was graduated in law from that institution in 1893, beginning the practice of his profession in Hogansville in the same year. After remaining there three years he came, in October, to LaGrange, where he became associated with W. T. Tuggle as junior member of the law firm of Moon & Tuggle. This connection lasted from 1897 until Mr. Tuggle withdrew to accept an appointment as ; solicitor for the city courts of LaGrange, the firm having a fine reputation and handling a large amount of legal business each year. In 1910 Mr. Moon was appointed by President Taft as census supervisor for the Fourth Congressional District, comprising ten counties, the duties of which he performed in a highly satisfactory manner. In the fall of 1912 he was elected to the State Legislature and served in 1913 and 1914. His election as Senator followed in the fell of 1914, and proved conclusively that he had fully established himself in the public confidence, which, it may be said, he has never strayed Senator Moon is progressive in all things where reform is needed but is strongly opposed to ill-advised legislation. He is counsel for the LaGrange Bank and is both an acute and able attorney and an eloquent advocate at the bar.


Indeed, it may be said that he is one of the most powerful and convincing orators in this part of the state and has often taken the stump in political campaigns on behalf of his friends, but never for himself. He is a lover of good literature and is especially well versed in history. In religion he is a Baptist, while his fraternal affiliations are with the Masonic order.


Senator Moon was married March 4, 1902, at West Point, Troup County, Georgia, to Miss Nathan Lyon Winston, a daughter of O. D., and Louise (Lyon) Winston, of West Point. Her father who was a well-to-do farmer and cotton broker, and during the was


a Confederate soldier, and died in 1892. Her mother is still living, and resides at the old home in West Point.


Four children have been born to Senator and Mrs. Moon, a] of LaGrange; namely: Anna Louise, born March 6, 1904; Fauntleroy, born June 6, 1908; Mary Tinsley, born in November, 1910, an Edward Thomas, born February 4, 1913.


Senator Moon was admitted to the bar of the Federal Court both District and Circuit Courts of Appeals, the Supreme Court an Courts of Appeals of Georgia, and on May 21, 1900, was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States.


On October 1, 1917, he was appointed Judge of the City Court of LaGrange by Governor Hugh M. Dorsey. This appointment w' made without his knowledge. He accepted the appointment an served until October 1, 1919, and resigned in order to give his time to the general practice of law. During said two years of service every decision rendered by him that was carried to the Court of Appeals was affirmed. He has taken the time from his law practice during the past twenty years to deliver many political speeches memorial and commencement addresses.


In his law practice an old negro came to his office to get a d divorce. After filing the divorce suit the old darkey went his w' rejoicing. A few days before court convened he saw the old dark. and told him to be on hand a certain day of the court, to which the old darkey replied, "Law me, ain't you done went and got dat 'vorce yit? Ise done married long 'go."


The following is an extract from Dr. Lucian Knight's boo "Georgia and Georgians," volume 5, page 2524:


"Hon. Edward Thomas Moon. There is no way a man of ability can demonstrate his usefulness than as a servant of the people. In this connection it would not be out of place to paraphrase an adage into the form, 'An honest politician is the noblest work God.' All civilization rests upon law; laws are made by legislators in this country elected by the people. It makes a vast difference therefore, whether the men who are elected for this purpose J honest or otherwise; whether they are regardful of the public weal or, seeking their own personal interest, only, allow themselves to become the tools of unscrupulous corporations or other organizations of men bent upon public plunder. Legislators who conscientiously perform their duty deserves credit; all others should be speedily consigned to political oblivion. It is in the former class that we would place the subject of this memoir. Hon. Edward Thomas boon, of LaGrange, Troup County, senator for the Thirty-seventh Senatorial District of Georgia, whose record in public life is one that his fellow-citizens both know and cordially approve."


JOSEPH NOAH MOON

JOSEPH NOAH MOON, farmer, Loganville, Walton County, Georgia; son of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 4, 1869. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon. He was married January 19, 1898, to Miss Ada Kilgore, daughter of Mr. d Mrs. J. P. Kilgore. They had born unto them five children, as follows: Homer, Claude, Otis, Odean and Cleveland. Otis and Odean are twins.


He acquired a common school education in the public schools the county, and his principal occupation is farming. Before he married he was a salesman in a dry goods store. When he and I were boys, father kept a steer and cart on the farm, and I claimed steer because I broke him to the cart. One day father told us eke the steer and haul up a load of corn. We yoked him up and y we went to the cornfield; while we were loading the corn the steer gave us some trouble; he would want to eat peavines and would not move a budge. After I had worried with him for quite awhile, Joe said, "Let me have the scoundrel; I will get a move on him." As I turned the beast over to him he let in on him with a stick "kerwhack! kerwhack!" Right across the field he went at neck speed. "Whoa, Buck! Whoa, Buck! Whoa, Buck!" he d say; but by this time Buck had got to the fence and turned down a steep bluff, one wheel of the cart running over a stump, turning it upright, and covering Joe with the corn. While Buck was lying on the ground with his neck twisted up in the yoke bellowing I was standing laughing at the upright wheel as it was spinning around. After we got everything adjusted and the corn reloaded Joe gave me the lines and said he was harder to stop than as to start.


HOMER MOON

Homer Moon, son of J. N., and Ada (Kilgore) Moon, and grandson of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Rockdale County, Georgia, February, 1899. He received his education in the country schools and the A. and M. School at Monroe, Ga. He is a member of the Baptist church and is clerk of Center Hill church. He was married on November 9, 1919, to Miss Della Irwin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. P. Irwin.


WILLIAM HENRY MOON

(This Sketch Written by Col. J. R. Irwin, Conyers, Ga.)


William HENRY MOON, the author of this book; third son of Lafayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, November 11, 1870. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Martha (Jones) (Moon). He was reared the farm and acquired the elements of knowledge in the country and the high school at Loganville, Ga., and took a course ;teacher training at the State Normal at Athens in 1896. He taught for five years in the country schools, four years at Sharon, Walton County, and one year at Bethel, Rockdale County.


On December 12,1900, he was married to Miss Mamie T. Cowan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cowan. They had born unto I six children, as follows: Addie Mae, born September 14, , deceased; Flora Dean, born September 25, 1903; James Roy, August 11, 1904, deceased; Mamie Belle, born July 20, 1907; Willie Ruth, born September 30, 1912.


He joined the Christian church the 8th day of August, 1902, was baptized by Rev. J. E. Lambert, of College Park, and was elected Elder of the church in November following his baptism. his father, he is an active and faithful member, attending every service possible. He has been superintendent of the Sunday school for a number of years.


Although he is not a preacher he has preached some.


1908 he was appointed N. P. Ex-Officio J. P. by Governor Smith and has held the office for nearly twelve years.


1910 he organized a rural telephone company of which he was made president. It was one of the first rural lines built in Rockdale County. In 1916 he was elected president of the Centerville Union Sunday School Association and has served in a satisfactory manner four years, doing all that he could to promote the interests of the Sunday school cause. Also in 1916 he helped organize the Moon reunion, which is the largest organization of its kind in the state. He was elected as its president and has been re-elected unanimously every year since. He has made several along lectures the line of progress, influence and right living, doing everything in his power to raise the standard of this immense family, which was the stepping stone to the writing of this book.


In 1919 he was elected divisional superintendent of the Georgia Sunday School Association, and has just entered upon its duties. Whatever he undertakes he does it to the best of his skill and knowledge.


After he married he gave up his profession of teaching and bought a farm and has made farming his principal occupation.


Mr. Moon in his boyhood days had quite an experience one night with a haunt, which turned out to be a hive of bees. A neighbor had bought a hive and tied it up in a sheet to move it, bringing the corners of the sheet over the top of the hive and tying them, leaving about a foot sticking up which resembled two white ears. Not having it tied up very good they began crawling out and made it so hot for him that he set them out of the buggy over in a patch of weeds. Mr. Moon was returning home that night from an entertainment at a neighbor's home. On nearing this object he spied it, seeing the white object with two big white ears moving as the wind was blowing. He promptly evacuated that vicinity, or in other words, he beat it for home in high gear. The next morning he went back to investigate and found that it had turned into hive of bees.


MAMIE T. MOON

Mamie T. Moon wife of WiIliam Henry Moon, was born on January 19, 1873. She joined the Christian church in her early girlhood days and was baptized by Rev. J. H. Wood, and has been an active and faithful member for thirty-two years.


IDA J. (MOON) CARTER

IDA J. (Moon) CARTER, daughter of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on March 23, 1872. On February 16, 1888, she was married to Y. P. Carter, son of Matthew Carter. They had only one child, Dessie era.


Mr. Carter owned about two hundred acres of land. He died in November, 1901. Mrs. Carter, after her marriage, joined the Methodist church, and has been a member for several years.


Vera, her daughter, was born in Walton County, Georgia February 12, 1890, and graduated from the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, at Milledgeville, Ga.


On September 15, 1909, she was married to C. C. Weaver, son of Rat Weaver. They have two children, Carter and Emiline.


Mr. Weaver was graduated at the State University at Athens, Ga., and has taught school several years. He is also a progressive farmer.


ALICE ELIZABETH MOON

ALICE ELIZABETH Moon daughter of LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, w as born in Walton County Georgia, on November 13, 1873, and was married to Robert E. Smith, son of Jasper Smith in January, 1894.


She joined the Baptist church in her girlhood days and has been an active member. Her husband, R. E. Smith, is a good farmer owner of his farm, and raises everything he uses. He also traps for all kinds of furs. They had five children, Grace, born October 21,1894, and was married to Tum Atha July 5, 1914, and have two children, Clark and Nelson; Ralph, born December 26, 1896; Carl, born January 8, 1899; Lucile, born December 17, 1908; Dorsey, born July 6, 1914.


SEREPTHA ANGELINE MOON

SEREPTHA ANGELINE MOON, daughter of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County. Georgia, May 3, 1875. She joined the Baptist church when quit' young, and was married on December 3, 1896, to A. O. Cowan, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cowan.


Mr. Cowan is a member of the Christian church and belongs to the Masonic order. He taught school one term, and in former years was engaged in the mercantile business, and now he thrifty farmer, owning several hundred acres of land in Rock County.


Mr. and Mrs. Cowan had born unto them five children, as lows: Annie, Edward LaFayette, William Clifford, Earnest, one died in infancy.


Mrs. Cowan died on December 22, 1903. It can be truly of her, she was a good wife and mother. Her death was the one to occur in her father's family.


Edward, the oldest son, entered the A. and M. school at roe in 1915, and graduated with first honor in 1918, and is now tiny his knowledge into practice on the farm.


A. O. Cowan, husband of the subject of this sketch, while his boyhood days owned a small farm and had Harris Course, living on it, working on halves, Mr. Coursey using his buggy horse ploughing. One day Mr. Cowan had an engagement with his girl to carry her to a picnic. Mr. Coursey was a very old man could stand his hand very well. Mr. Cowan went to the field w he was ploughing and told him he would have to have his h The old man positively refused to let him have the horse, so he was; this old contrary man had the horse and this girl had carried to the picnic. After pleading with this old gentleman awhile, he decided he would take the horse by force. As he stepped up and began taking the horse out, the old gentleman jumped on him, and there they had it, first one on top and then the scratching and pulling hair until they were exhausted. After calling the battle off and promising each other that they would I tell it, he took his horse and went his way rejoicing, feeling as happy as George Dewey after the Battle of Manila Bay.


MARSHAL LAFAYETTE MOON

MARSHAL LAFAYETTE MOON, son of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia June 23, 1877, and was married December 80, 1899, to Miss Hogan, and have had born unto them five children, as foil Rosie, Thomas, Lena Belle, Walter and Stephen LaFayette.


After his marriage he farmed a few years, then moved Loganville, Ga., and worked at the carpenter's trade for five Not being satisfied to give up farming, he purchased a fern and went actively into this occupation and is making a success. He believes in making more than he can consume of all farm products. His fraternal affiliation is with the Odd Fellows, of which order he has been an active member for several years. When a lad of a boy his father had Mr. J. W. Webb building a chimney. When Mr. Webb had an occasion to use his trowel he found that he had left it at home. He put Marshal on a mule and sent him for the trowel, cautioning him not to forget what it was. After giving him a description of the tool wanted, told him to tell Mrs. Webb to get it for him. When he reached the Webb home he had forgotten the name of the tool. He could not make Mrs. Webb understand what it was. He told her he thought it was a dirt-dauber. He had to finally get off the mule and mark the shape of it on the ground before be could get the right tool.


GORDON DeKalb MOON

GORDON DeKalb MOON, son of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, July 7, 80. He was married in December, 1906, to Miss Della Thompson daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Meat Thompson. They have had re children born unto them.


He is a carpenter and contractor. He worked in Alabama and Mississippi two years building railroad trestles, and has built a number of houses in and around Loganville. For the last two years has been employed by the United States Government building, camps and ships. His fraternal affiliation is with the Odd Fellows, of which order he has been a member for quite awhile.


When he was about six years of age his father had a fine watermelon patch. The vines were just beginning to run when he went down to the patch to get a melon, and finding none on the vines, he decided they must be on the roots, so he pulled up nearly all the vines in the patch hunting for the melons.


JOSEPH DeKalb MOON

JOSEPH DeKalb MOON, son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) C) Moon, was born November 27, 1836, and was married on December 20, 1867, to Miss Zippora Cannon. His paternal grandparents were Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon. Mr. Moon, like all of his brothers, was reared on the farm and taught the principles of farming of that day. He received a common school education in the country schools. In 1861 he enlisted in Company G., 36th Georgia regiment, and was in many hard-fought battles. At the close of the war he came home and resumed farming.


In 1884 he engaged in the dairy business on a small scale. He bought his first Jersey cow in Covington, Ga., at $126.00; another from Edonton, Ga., at $266.00, while the common scrub stock were bringing from $16.00 to $20.00. In a few years he built up a herd of thirty-odd Jerseys, of pure bred and grades. He built one of the first silos that was built in the state. His investment in this enterprise was a success.


Now his heart was set on the plains of old Virginia, where he roamed as a soldier in the army. He loved old Virginia, and in the fall of 1889 sold his beautiful farm in Walton County, near Walnut Grove, bid his numerous friends and kindred adieu, and moved his family to Maryland, where he engaged in farming for several years. from there he moved to Washington City, where he engaged in the wood and coal business until his health began to fail.


While in the army his commander called for a volunteer to limb a tall tree to see where the Yankees were. He being active and small in stature, climbed the tree and yelled out that there were Yankees everywhere; almost got us surrounded and fixing to close in on us. As he hastened down orders were given to move to action at once.


Every time that he visited this old battlefield since he would climb this tree. Mr. W. F. McDaniel, of Conyers, Ga., said that c last account he had of this incident, he had climbed this tree thirty-nine times.


Both Mr. and Mrs. Moon belonged to the Christian church. Their membership was at Corinth while they lived in Georgia.


They had born unto them four children, as follows: Aldert F., Walter D., Homer C., and Myrtie C. Mr. Moon was confined to his bed for four years, dying October sober 15, 1916. His body was brought back to Georgia and was buried at the Cannon graveyard near Walnut Grove.


ALBERT F. MOON

ALBERT F. MOON, son of Joseph DeKalb and Zippora (Cannon) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, January 15, 1859. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon. He was educated at Emory College, graduating therefrom in 1882, with first honor. He taught school three years in Georgia, one year in Tennessee, and three years in North Carolina.


After moving to Maryland with his father in 1889, he married September 7, 1892, to Miss Effie Hill, of that state, and is engaged in farming in Virginia, and is a progressive farmer. They had born unto them one child, Hubert H. Hubert graduated from Cornell University, Ithica, N. Y., in 1918. He married Miss Annie Mitchell on July 6, 1919.


WALTER D. MOON

WALTER D. MOON, son of Joseph DeKalb and Zippora (Cannon) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, December 29, 1864. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon. He attended Covington High School and graduated at Emory College. In December, 1889, he moved with his father to Montgomery County, Maryland, where he engaged in farming with his father till 1895, when he accepted a position with the Capital Traction Street Railway Co., as engineer in the power plant. He remained in Washington, D. C., till 1901, when he resigned to accept a position with the United States Navy Department as engineer in the power plant of the smokeless powder factory at Indian 7 Head, Md., where he still holds this position.


On July 28, he was married to Miss Nellie W. Mitchell, of Parker, Spottsylvania County, Virginia. They had born unto them five children, as follows: Routh Anna, born May 16, 1910; Florence Walton, born March 20, 1912; Edith May, born March 7, 1913; Nellie Louise, born March 28, 1914, and died August 23, 1914; Walter Mitchell, born May 26, 1916. Mr. Moon is also vice-president of the Indian Head Bank.


HOMER C. MOON

HOMER C. MOON, third son of Joseph and Zippora (Cannon) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, May 2, 1871. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon. He entered Emory College but did not graduate, as his father sold out and moved to Maryland. He held several good positions in Baltimore and other places as an engineer. On May 2, 1894, he was married to Grace Ward. They had only one child. Homer died from cancer of the throat on April 4, 1919.


MYRTIE C. MOON

MYRTIE C. MOON, daughter of Joseph DeKalb and Zippora (Cannon) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 20 1875. Her paternal grandparents were Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon She was about fourteen years of age when her father moved to Maryland. She completed her education there and taught music for several years. On June 29, 1904, she was married to J. H. S. Hodges of Ayden, N. C. She made one trip back to Georgia before she married.


GEORGE WASHINGTON MOON

GEORGE WASHINGTON Moon, third son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in the year 1838, and was married to Mrs. Dollie Lester. By this union they had five children born unto them: Betsy, who married T. J. Kiskadon, of Lebanon, La., and had one child, Joseph G. W., of Cheneyville, La.; Joe, who married R. L. Stewart, of Koran, La.;; Sallie, who married D. J. James, of Sailes, La., and one infant that died when he lived in Georgia. Mr. Moon enlisted in the Confederate army in Company G., 35th Georgia regiment, and w as in many hard-fought battles; a braver and truer soldier never lived.


When his brother, Andrew, fell on the battlefield, killed by a Yankee bullet, this kindled his hatred for them, and he rushed toward the firing line and his comrades had to hold him back. He did not fear a close place and came out of the war without a single, scratch.


His father bought one of the first buggies of the country. One day he told his boys to haul up some rocks, as he intended to kill hogs on the next day. It was the custom in those days to build log-heap and place rocks in it to heat water with. George caught a mule and was hitching it to the buggy when his father asked him what was he going to do. He said he was going over in the field haul some rocks, and of course, he did not haul rocks in that new buggy.


Mr. Moon was a member of the Baptist church.


CATHERINE MOON

CATHERINE Moon, daughter of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on March 20, 1837, and was married to Thomas L. Moon January 14, 1855. By this union they had born unto them four children: Thomas Joseph Tilmon, born October 2, 1855, and died November 25, 1895; Lewis Charlie L., born February 7, 1859, and died May 16, 1910; Nonnie, born January 15, 1857, and was married to William Simpson, and had eight children: Cora, Alexander, Thomas, Lola, Joseph, James, Orien, Myrtle, Vivian. Nonnie died February 28, 1918.


ADDIE MOON

ADDIE MOON, daughter of Thomas and Catherine Moon, was born February 20, 1861, and was married to J. J. Humphries


June 20, 1885, and by this union they had eight children: Jessie Irene, Bessie Inez, Thomas Josiah, Annie Runie, Oliver Homer, Ernest Noble, Frederick and Hugh.


Mr. Humphries, her husband, is a progressive farmer and owns large farming interests in Gwinnett County, and now resides at Norcross, Ga.


Thomas Moon, the father of the above-named children, was a son of Elijah Moon. He enlisted in the Confederate army at the beginning of hostilities, in Company G., 35th Georgia regiment, and served until his death on November 13, 1862, of smallpox. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Moon was married to Wilson L. Mitchell on December 6, 1865. By this union they had five children: Joshuaway, who married Nettie Long, daughter of R. A. and Josephine (Moon) Long, she being a first cousin to her husband. By this union they had six children. He was a carpenter and contractor and resided in Alabama at the time of his death. He was a very fine carpenter and built many trestles on the railroads of Alabama and Mississippi.


JAMES R. MITCHELL

JAMES R. MITCHELL, son of Wilson L., and Catherine (Moon) Mitchell, was born April 16, 1869, and was married to Miss Floy Elizabeth Baker on December 24, 1894. By this union they ad eleven children, as follows: Farrish Furman, Merritt DeKalb, James Curtis, Thomas Nelson, Samuel Kennett, (deceased), Nonnie May, Mattie Bell, (deceased), Susan Matilda, Marion E., Wilson Franklin, and Marguerite Ulala.


He is a progressive farmer and owns some farms in Gwinnett County.


MATTIE BELL MITCHELL

MATTIE BELL MITCHELL, daughter of Wilson L., and Catherine Mitchell, was born in Walton County, Georgia, and was married to Samuel N. Martin in 1895 and they have two children, Susan Mitchell was married to Alexander M. Gill in 1895, and have two children. Frederick Mitchell, third son of Wilson and Catherine Mitchell, was married to Miss Candy Stephens in 1901, and they have two children.


ANDREW J. MOON

ANDREW J. MOON, son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 21, 1840, and was married to Miss Mary Ann Blake on December 1, 1859, and had only one child, Martha C., who was born October 16, 1860, and married T. N. Simonton, son of George R. Simonton, on March 1, 1885.


Martha C. had nine children, as follows: Mary Lizzie, who married Richard Rice; Beulah, who married Noon Willowford; George Robert, deceased; Jennie, John, Olin, Zollie, Mollie, and Powell.


Mr. Moon enlisted in the Confederate army and served until he was killed in battle in July, 1863. He was a member of Company G., 35th Georgia regiment. His widow, Mary A. Moon, died February 26, 1915.


AUGUSTUS J. MOON

AUGUSTUS J. MOON, son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, March 15, 1842, and we' married to Miss Elizabeth Graham, daughter of David Graham ham, May 11, 1865. By this union they had five children, Emma Savannah, Mary, Cora and Alonzo.


Mr. Moon is a farmer and resides on his farm in Walton County , being a part of the tract of land that his father owned and where he was born and raised. He enlisted in the Confederate army in Company G., 35th Georgia regiment and was in many hard-fought battles. At the close of the war he came home, married and went to farming, which he has followed since. He and his wife belonged to the Baptist church.


He was a fine rock mason and chimney builder. When he finished a chimney he would give instructions to keep the cats away or they would be drawn up the chimney. He and several others one day were discussing how far back some people could recollect. After they had all related their stories, and knowing that his father was the oldest man in the county, and could recollect farther back than any man, he said, "Pap can recollect when yellow-hammers flew straight."


After the death of his wife he was married to Miss Dora Graham.


Emma, his oldest daughter, was married to George Camp, and had one child. She died the next year after she was married.


SAVANNAH MOON

SAVANNAH MOON, daughter of Augustus J., and Elizabeth (Graham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, August 24, 1868, and was married to Aufie Lucas on December 13, 1894, and by this union they had three children: Augustus M., born October 2, 1895, and was married to Miss Nora Peek December 28, 1917, and have one child, Thomas Clifford; John W., born April 29,1898; Viola, born July 12,1904.


Mrs. Lucas is a member of the Baptist church, while her husband, Aufie Lucas, is a member of the Christian church.


Cora, daughter of Augustus J., and Elizabeth Moon, was born in Newton County, Georgia, July 30, 1878.


Alonzo Moon, the only son of Augustus J., and Elizabeth Moon, was born in Newton County, Georgia, August 6,1874, and was married to Miss Mandy Owens in August, 1902. By this union they had six children: Parrie, Clara, Carrie, Turner, Floyd and Annie B.


Mary Moon, daughter of Augustus J., and Elizabeth Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, February 14, 1871, and was married to William B. Humphries on September 21, 1890. They had born unto them seven children: Aaron, born April 25, 1902; Carl, born February 20, 1904; Aldean, born December 25, 1910; J. B., born October 9, 1912; Myrtle, born March 6,1914, and two died in infancy.


Mr. and Mrs. Humphries are members of the Baptist church.


JOSEPHINE ELIZABETH MOON

JOSEPHINE ELIZABETH MOON, daughter of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 29, 1844, and was married to Richard A. Long in 1859. By this union they had seven children: Jefferson D., Richard L., Mattie, Joseph Erastus, Nettie and Mollie.


R. A. Long was born in October, 1831. He enlisted in the Confederate army and served until he received a wound in the hip which caused his death on May 13, 1879. He was a prosperous farmer, a good neighbor and citizen.


After his death his widow, Josephine, was married to Lee Long in 1883, and by this union they had one child, Rivie, who died quite young.


In 1909 Mrs. Long's health began to fail, and on March 17, 1910, she died of heart failure.


JEFFERSON D. LONG

JEFFERSON D. LONG, son of Richard A., and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on August 9, 1860, and was married to Miss Sallie Cox, daughter of Richard Cox. By this union they had one child named Ethel, who married William A. Cooper.


After the death of his wife Mr. Long was married to Miss Janie Brand, and by this union they had four children.


Mr. Long was a man with a bright mind, and had a prosperous future; but, alas! he took the typhoid fever and died January 31, 1891, at the age of 31 years. He was a very fine singer and organist, and also an excellent singing teacher. He belonged to the Missionary Baptist church, and had been licensed to preach for several years.


Had he lived he would have made a great preacher. He and most of his brothers and sisters were gifted in music. He could handle most any kind of musical instrument.


RICHARD L. LONG

RICHARD L. LONG, son of Richard A., and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, February 8, 1861, and was married to Miss Ludie Myers, daughter of Shepard Myers.


He was a good farmer and belonged to the Missionary Baptist church. He was stricken with typhoid fever and died October 8, 1890.


JOSEPH ERASTUS LONG

JOSEPH ERASTUS LONG, third son of Richard A., and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, October 10,1869, and was married to Miss Lucy Brand, daughter of Eudock Brand. By this union they had five children: Erick, born March 27, 1893; Cloe, born June 2, 1898; D. Richard, born January 22, 1901; Nell, born March 23,1904; Joseph, born September 30,1907.


Mr. Long is a farmer, and like his oldest brother, is talented in music. He was in Covington one day when a man representing John Robinson s show, approached him, and gave him a free ticket and some advertising matter to tack up, and told him to put them up at some very public place. When he came home he went away back on a branch where there was a moonshine still and tacked the advertisements all over all the beer stands, and said that this was the most public place he knew of.


MATTIE LONG

MATTIE LONG, daughter of Richard A., and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, July 7, 1867, and was married to James C. Tribble. By this union they had three children: Daisy, who married Joseph P. Day; Albert, who is in Tennessee; Jesse L., who married Evelyn Graham, daughter of P. L. Graham, and by this union they have three children.


Mattie died October 3,1890.


NETTIE LONG

NETTIE LONG, daughter of Richard A., and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, August 30,1871, and was married to Joshuaway Mitchell, her first cousin, and they had born unto them eight children.


MOLLIE LONG

MOLLIE LONG, daughter of Richard A., and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, September 20, 1875, and was married to Jody Myers, and had ten children.


Rivie, a half-sister, was born October 7, 1883, and died October 6, 1890.


EDOM T. MOON

EDOM T. MOON, son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, December 14, 1845, and was married to Elizabeth Webb, daughter of Rev. James Webb, on September 2, 1866. By this union they had ten children, as follows: Troy L., Maggie, Colman, Lou, Arie, Zippora, Gertrude, Mack, Maud and Tillie.


Mr. Moon enlisted in the Confederate army in 1862, in Company G., 35th Georgia regiment, and served throughout the war. He participated in many hard-fought battles, among them being Seven Pines, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and many others. What education he received was in the common schools of the county. He was a man with a brilliant mind and when he undertook to do a thing, he did it. He taught school for several years and delighted in the teaching of mathematics. He was Justice of the Peace for several years and was a good judge of law. He read law under W. J. Ray, of Walton County, and was admitted to the bar on February 17, 1886, when he resigned the office of Justice of the Peace to practice his profession.


The first case he had he completely wound up an opponent who had years of experience. He practiced his profession continuously until he died on November 28, 1908.


When he was a boy he liked sports and was very active for a two-hundred-pounder, and delighted in swimming, diving and turning somersaults in the water --- he could not be beaten.


After being with a crowd of boys in some mill pond he would dream that he was in bathing and would get up in his sleep and say, "Look out, boys; I'm coming!" and he would turn a somersault off the bed into the middle of the floor and catch on his feet. He said that there was only one thing impossible, and that was to carry an armful of live eels across a foot-log and not drop one.


Just before he was admitted to the bar he went to Atlanta to get a new suit, and having a long head he could not find a hat large enough so he had to leave the hat off. Upon meeting a friend, he asked him how he liked his new suit. He said, "I believe if I were you I would get a new hat." Mr. Moon replied that he had hunted all over Atlanta and could not find one large enough to fit him.


TROY MOON

TROY MOON, son of Edom T., and Elizabeth (Webb) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, February 2, 1868, and was married to Miss Ida Cooper on November 1, 1888. By this union they had fourteen children, as follows: Cornelius L., Ranford B., Roscoe W., Matthews W., Lena, Ruby L., Jeanette, Rama, Lillie Mae Mary L., Joseph S., and Ida.


The following are his brothers and sisters and who they married:


Maggie, who married Alexander S. Rutledge, and have four children. Coleman, who died young.


Lou, who married Richard Swords, and had five children.


Arie, who married James Oliver, son of Pink Oliver, and had eleven children.


Zippora, who married Alexander Oliver, and had nine children.


Gertrude, who married Whit W. Curry, and had six children.


Mack, who never married, he having died in the bloom of youth while he was preparing for the ministry. He had bright prospects before him to make a mark in life.


Maud, who married Oliver Ragsdale, and had five children.


Tillie, who married Jack Rollins, and had five children.


CHARLES KNOX POLK MOON

CHARLES KNOX POLK MOON, son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, March 23, 1847, and was married to Miss Dee Guthrie in 1867. By this union they had eleven children. I will give their names and who they married in this sketch:


Oscar, was born in 1872, and was married to Nonnie Moon in 1893, and they have three children, Zuma, Bertha and Ethel.


Sarah E.


Nancy T., married Benjamin Black, and had two children.


Foster, born in 1874. I don't know who he married, but his seven children were as follows: Grady, Otis, Herschel, Annie Bell, Lucile, Irene, and one died in infancy.


Edna, who married Clinton Moon, her second cousin, and had eight children: Pinkey, Pearlie, Mattie Lee, Flaudie, Elzie, Estelle, Birt and Effie.


Emory, who married Miss Mollie Odum in 1904, and had seven children: Duren, Edwin, Gladys, Ezma, and three died during infancy .


Essie, who married Andrew Wood. They had five children: Everett, Arthur, Birdis, Oliver, and one died in infancy.


Etta, who married John Crow, and had eight children: Howard, Herschel, Floy, L. J., Thomas L., Grover, Velma, and one died in infancy. .


Pauline, a half-sister, who married Jesse Mayfield, and had one child, Carl.


These children are all doing well and most of them own their own homes.


C. K. P. Moon, father of these children, after the death of his first wife, married Fannie Durden, and by this union they had one child. He enlisted in the Confederate army, Company G., 35th Georgia regiment, and served throughout the war. He was at one time an agent for a gas burner, an attachment for a kerosene lamp. He sold hundreds of them, and would make a sale at nearly every home. After they were thoroughly tried out they proved to be a fake. He next tried Jones' Defender, by placing it on a ploughstock to demonstrate it. He was demonstrating it at Loganville one Saturday in Dr. R. A. Hammond's brag-patch. After ploughing several rows he drove up to the end where there was a great crowd looking on and asked the doctor how he liked it. After a moment of silence the doctor said: "Well, Charlie; if you will get one of your famous gas burners and place it on the beam of your ploughstock, you can come away; it will go w without you or the mule." After the crowd enjoyed this joke on him, they placed a large number of orders with him, for they knew that he had something that was very useful.


FRANKLIN PIERCE MOON

FRANKLIN PIERCE MOON, the youngest son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, about the year 1851, and went to Texas about the time he was grown and never returned to his native state.


He followed farming until he lost an arm in a cotton gin, and later he was a rural mail carrier.


He was married twice and had five children.


SARAH E. MOON

SARAH E. MOON, daughter of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1849, and was married to Em Sigman, and by this union they had twelve children, as follows: Carrie, Elizabeth, Henry C., Anna, Walter, Grover, Richard, and the others died while small.


Mr. Sigman followed farming most of his life. He and his wife belonged to the Baptist church from their early days.


MARTHA AMY MOON

MARTH AMY MOON, the youngest daughter of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, about the year 1855, and was married to John Nunnally, and by this union they had four children, as follows: Stewart, Johnnie, Della and Laler.


Stewart married Miss Mary Lizzie Dial, daughter of David and Mary Dial. He now resides in California.


I do not know who the other three married.


Martha, after she separated from her husband, went with her son, Stewart, to California, where she was married the second time to J. J. Brown.


This chapter finishes the sketches of Joseph Moon's children. All of his descendants down to the present time, makes five generations.


The Moon Reunion

I MUST now write a short chapter on the Moon reunion. This organization is just in its infancy and is one of the largest organizations of its kind in the State of Georgia. The author and Col. J. R. Irwin talked of organizing it and finally others became interested and it was advertised in the Walton Tribune, the paper in the county where the Moons are so numerous, that a reunion of the descendants of Joseph Moon and other relatives would be held at Sharon Baptist church, in Walton County, Georgia, on August 15, 1917


By nine o'clock on that day they were pouring in from different counties all over Georgia, until they numbered five hundred or more, consisting of full Moons, half Moons and quarter Moons.


After greeting one another, some of whom they had not seen in years, a long table out in the grove was loaded with all kinds of eatables. After doing justice to the dinner, and all Moons had changed to full Moons, they assembled in the church, where several talks were made touching on the Moon family and a permanent organization. After discussing the question for awhile a vote was taken and it passed unanimously to make the organization a permanent one.


The officers elected were, as follows: President, W. H. Moon; Vice-President, A. S. J. Moon; Secretary, Clayton C. Weaver; Assistant Secretary, Miss Julia Moon; Committee on Invitation, J. N. Moon, J. L. Long and Mrs. A. J. Moon; Chaplain, R. L. Moon.


The motto of this organization is "Progress in All Things That Are Good."


The president has at each meeting made speeches along this line and advocated higher ideals and better citizenship; better boys and better girls. If these principles are carried out and each one lends a helping hand in making things hum, there is no doubt but what it will be a grand movement started in the right direction in training the young boys and girls of today to be great men and women of tomorrow. We pass through this world but once and we must grasp every opportunity to do all the good we can, to all the people we can,, just as long as we can.


Other Moons

EVIDENTLY all the Moons of the South are descendants of Thomas Moon. I have some information of a few that I cannot trace their ancestors and will proceed to give a sketch of them as I have it, for the benefit of the readers, as some may be able to trace their ancestors and may be of some benefit in the future, if any one yet to be born should undertake to supplement or rewrite this book. There are a number of Moons in the Southern States that we cannot trace, and they themselves, cannot trace farther back than two or three generations. Every family ought to know who they are and where they came from and what their ancestors of three or four generations back did in life. They owe it to themselves and to their children. I would be proud to know all about the life of my great-grandfather or his brothers or any other generation. I would like to know what influences for good they carried in their lives, whether or not they made life worth-while.


J. C. MOON

J. C. MOON, Cleola, Harris County, Georgia, son of Jesse and Mary (Phillips) Moon, was born in Troup County, Georgia, in 1844. His paternal grandfather, Moon, was one of the earliest settlers of Harris County, and his father was a well-known devoted Methodist preacher. Late in life he migrated to Arkansas, where he died. Mr. Moon's mother was a daughter of a Mr. Phillips, whose family were among the early settlers of Elbert County. Mr. Moon was quite young when the family went to Arkansas, where he grew to manhood on the farm, and with exceedingly limited educational advantages. In 1861 he enlisted in a company commanded by Capt. Lewis, which formed a part of an Indian regiment, but was never in a regular engagement. After the war he returned to Harris County, cultivated rented land for many years, making his first purchase in 1874. Since that time he has bought and paid for the excellent farm he now lives on, and is comfortably situated. He is a man of untiring industry, a good farmer and a well thought of citizen. Mr. Moon was married in 1866 to Miss Elizabeth Milder, born in Harris County in 1849, a daughter of L. B., and Sarah (Lossen) Milner. He v. as born in Jasper County and was a faithful soldier during the late Civil War. Of the children which blessed this union nine survive: Sarah, Jesse H., Hixie, Pearlie, Joseph, George, Sidney Robert T., and Ben Hill. His wife is a consistent member of the Baptist church.


J. ROBERT MOON

J. ROBERT MOON, postmaster, Dallas, Paulding County, Georgia, son of James K., and Mary J. (Butner) Moon, was born near Hiram, Paulding County, Georgia, in 1853. His paternal grandfather, John W. Moon, was born in the latter part of the last century in Lincoln County, Georgia, in which he was raised, and was a Justice of the Peace many years. In 1837 he moved to Paulding County, where he died forty years later. Mr. Moon's father was born in Lincoln County in 1820, and was raised a farmer. In 1853 he moved to Powder Springs, Cobb County, Georgia, where he engaged in merchandising and soon established a prosperous business. In 1861 he enlisted in Company D, 7th Georgia regiment, and was appointed third lieutenant. He participated in the first and second Mannassas battles, soon after which he was discharged on account of sickness. In 1863 he re-enlisted in Company I, Seventh Georgia cavalry, and was commissioned third lieutenant. He served through all the Virginia campaigns to the close of hostilities, steadily refusing a higher commission. He lost fifteen slaves and much other valuable property by the war. On his return home he resumed farming and continued it until his death in 1870. His mother, a daughter of Thomas and Marina (Chandler) Butner, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1832. Her parents were of old North Carolina families. She was married when sixteen years old and died in October, 1883. Of the children born to them six are living; Zadoc B., Charles C., J. Robert, (the subject of this sketch,) Mrs. Harriet M. Sorrels, Mrs. Josephine L. S. Morris and Mrs. Maggie F. Welch. Mr. Moon was raised on the farm and was educated partly in the country schools and partly at Powder Springs. At the age of twenty-one he commenced an apprenticeship as carpenter and builder and in 1879 moved to Dallas, where he followed his trade. In 1885 he was made deputy sheriff and after serving four years was elected sheriff of the county. In 1891 he was elected a member of the town council and appointed Notary Public and Ex-Officio Justice of the Peace. In 1893 he was appointed postmaster at Dallas. In every position to which he has been advanced Mr. Moon has proven equal to its duties, all of w which he has fully and faithfully discharged --- the best evidence of which is his steady, continuous promotion. Mr. Moon was married in 1882 to Miss Sara J. Hagin, a daughter of Henry N., and Elizabeth (Stewart) Hagin, who has borne him four children: Jessie M., deceased; Bessie L., Clara L., and Robert R. Mr. Moon is a Master Mason and an influential member of the Baptist church.


Moons In Ohio

FOR the benefit of the readers I will give a short history of the Moons of Ohio from G. R. Moon of that State: G. R. Moon, son of Columbus Moon, was born in Ohio in 1877. His father's name was Columbus; his father, George; his father, Samuel; his father, Joseph; his father, John; his father, Simon; his father, Jasper Moon of William Penn's time. John Moon a brother of Joseph, came to Georgia, but do not know when, as we have no record of him. Joseph Moon, like the Joseph of Walton County, Georgia, was the one great generator of the Moons in Ohio. He was the father of ten sons and three daughters, and had 829 great-grandchildren, so we see there is considerable Moon blood in Ohio.


In 1682, when William Penn immigrated colonists to America, he established a colony of Moons in Buck County, Pennsylvania, and from there the family is traced to Red Stone, Western Pennsylvania, Western New York and to Virginia. This is an entirely different branch of the family as they sprang from the colony that William Penn brought from England and settled in Pennsylvania.


Jasper Moon, of William Penn's time, had one child, Simon, who married twice, and by his second wife had one child, John, who went to North Carolina and settled on the Neuse river, and married Miss Mary Farmer and had five children: Rachael, who married M. Bookout; John, went to Georgia, where he died; Joseph, married Ann Brown, and had ten sons and three daughters. Clinton County history goes on to tell of this Joseph and his family and I cannot find anything about the other two children of John and Mary Farmer's family. Daniel married Ruth Hutson; William married Jane Hutson; Samuel married Sarah Comer; John married Elizabeth Mount; Jesse married Annie Hockett; Thomas married Elizabeth Hockett; Solomon married Hannah McLin; Mary married James Garner; Grace died in infancy; Jane married John Routh. John, Samuel and John Routh, their brother-in-law, came to Ohio and settled near Martinsville in the fall of 1808. It is an evident fact that this G. R. Moon is not related to the Moons of the South as he has traced his ancestry back eight generations, back to the time that William Penn settled a colony of Moons in Pennsylvania, unless they were a branch of our immigrant ancestor that settled in North Carolina. Some of the descendants of Thomas Moon have drifted into nearly every state in the union.


Moons In New York

THIS chapter gives the history of the Moons in the State of New York, by James W. Moon, sheriff of Herkimer County.


John Moon, immigrant ancestor, settled in Newport Rhode Island. He died before 1732. He was a tax-payer as early as 1660. His will, dated September 25, 1728, was proven July 10, 17132. His widow, Sarah, was of Portsmouth, Rhode Island; executors, son-in-law Thomas Cory, and his wife Sarah. Bequeathed to daughter, Sarah Cory, dwelling house and lot of land for life; shell to grandson, John Moon, if he be living. Various other bequests to children and grand children. He may have been a brother of Robert and Ebenezer Moon, both of whom were living in Newport in 1676. Ebenezer Moon and wife, Elizabeth, had children from 1706 to later dates. At Kingstown, Rhode Island, he married Sara Sheriff, who died June 24, 1732, daughter of Thomas and Martha Sheriff. They had the following children: 1. John, mentioned below. 2. Sarah, married to Thomas Cory, son of William and Marthy (Cook) Cory, August 28, 1718. 3. Abigail, married a Vaughn. 4. Martha, married May 15, 1711, to Michael Cory, brother of Thomas Cory. 5. Elizabeth.


John II., son of John I., Moon, was born May 16, 1685, at Portsmouth and died there October 7, 1723. He married November 30, 1710, to Abigail, daughter of Enoch and Hannah ( Cool) Briggs. Their children born at Portsmouth: 1. John, mentioned below. 2. Hope, born December 31, 1712. 3. Abigail], born May 2,1717.


John II., son of John IT. Moon, born on August 26, 1711. 4. Dake Moon, descendant of John III. Moon, son or grandson, w as born about 1760, and married Elder Elisha Green October 16, 1785, at West Greenwich, Rhode Island, to Lydia Waite He left Rhode Island before the census of 1790, and his name is not found in New York, Massachusetts or Connecticut census of that year. Presumably he was missed or his name spelled wrong, or he may have been in some town in which the census was not preserved In 1790 James and Oliver Moon, probably his brothers, had families at West Greenwich. James had two sons over 16 years of age and one under that age. Oliver had two sons over 16 years of age and one under that age. The only other heads of families remaining in Rhode Island of this surname in 1790 were Ebenezer and Sanford Moon.


Ebenezer had three sons over 16 years of age and one under that age. Sanford had two sons over that age.


Phoebe Moon married May 28, 1786, at East Greenwich, to Caleb Briggs, and Mary Moon married at West Greenwich March 16,1771, to Jobe Straight. Peleg Moon, son of James Moon, married Mary Watson, daughter of Samuel Watson, November 6,1768, at West Greenwich. Lois Moon married Samuel Watson October l, 1768. Robert Moon, of West Greenwich, married Elizabeth Watson June 13, 1762. Jonathan Moon married at West Greenwich, February 6,1767, to Lydia Darling. These were closely related to Dake Moon. The New York branch descended from various pioneers of Rhode Island. In 1790 these were the heads of the families in that State: Alpheus, Anna, Benaja, Darius, Elizabeth, Henry, Job, John, John R., Michael, Minjah ah, Peleg, Robert and William. In Massachusetts in 1790 the family was located at Hampshire and Berkshire, at Lee, Cummington, Stockbridge and Tyrihgham. The heads of the families were Abraham, Benjamin, John and Joseph. George Moon lived in Boston. Dake Moon and his family moved in 1787 to Petersburg, New York, where he followed farming the remainder of his life. He died there May 17,1819, and Lydia, his wife, died there July 8,1817, at the age of 82 years, 3 months and 19 days, (grave stone.) 1. Simon, born at West Greenwich, Rhode Island, July 11, 1784. 2. Jefferson, mentioned below, had one daughter, Lydia, who married John Clear.


5. Jefferson Moon, son of Dake Moon, was born at Petersburg; November 21, 1801. The family moved from Petersburg, Rennselear County, to Northern New York with their household goods on an ox-cart. In 1822 he purchased the farm known as the Camp Ground Farm in Trenton, Oneida County, New York, on which he remained until 1833, when, selling this place, he removed to Cold Brook in Herkimer County, and lived there until his death on January 16,1876. He was much respected and loved by all who knew him. He was Justice of the Peace for twenty-five years, a wise administrator of town business and a just magistrate. He was for many years Justice of Sessions in the county court. He married first to Miss Martha Phillips on August 13,1820, born at Petersburg October 19, 1802, and died March 3, 1863. Martha Phillips came of distinguished New England ancestry, being on the maternal side descended from General Ethan Allen, the valiant soldier of the Revolution, the hero of Ticonderoga, and organizer and commander of the "Green Mountain Boys," prominent in the annals of American pioneer history. Jefferson Moon married Sophia Nelson, of Newport, N. Y., on September 26, 1866. 6. William Wallace, son of Jefferson Moon, was born April 29, 1843. He was reared in the town of Cold Brook and educated in the public schools there, and in the Fairfield Seminary. He taught school for five years and was agent of Cold Brook Union Store for three years. During the following years he was in partnership with his brother, Samuel, in the lumber business. Since he has been engaged in farming and dealing in livestock. He owns much real estate in Herkimer County. He is an intelligent and capable citizen and has been chosen to fill various offices of trust and honor. He was supervisor of the town for ten years. In 1879 he was chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Herkimer County, has been town clerk and served on the building committee of the Board of Supervisors when the county home was erected. He is vice-president of the Citizens National Bank of Poland. He was married January 26, 1886, to Alice McVoy, daughter of Patrick and Delilah (Willoughby) McVoy, Grant, N. Y. Her father was born in Ireland March 13,1818, and came to America with his mother when he was but one year old. His father was Michael McVoy, who was born and died in Ireland. His mother died on the voyage to America and was buried at sea. Patrick McVoy died in Cold Brook February 22, 1901. Delilah (Willoughby)


McVoy wife of Patrick McVoy, was born in Newport, N. V., March 2, 1817, and was married May 2, 1840, to a daughter of James and Anna (Cole) Willoughby. Her father was born in 1772 and died in Newport, N. Y., in 1866. Her mother was born in 1776 and died in 1862. Westel Willoughby, father of James Willoughby, was a manufacturer in Newport in the early days of the settlement. The Willoughby family came from Connecticut to New York, where the pioneer ancestors settled early in the history of the colonies. Children of William Wallace and Alice McVoy Moon: James Wallace and Flora A.


7. James Wallace, son of William Wallace, was born March 19, 1867, in Cold Brook, N. Y. His early education was obtained in the public schools. At the age of seventeen he became a teacher in the schools of Ohio, a neighboring town. A year later he entered the employment of A. B. Coonradt as a clerk in his general store in (Cold Brook, and continued there for three years. He then entered into a partnership with Frank Forest, and for twelve years the firm conducted a general store at Cold Brook. When the firm was dissolved at the end of that period the business was sold to Charles Cooper, and Mr. Moon succeeded to the business of his father as a dealer in livestock. He carried on an extensive business and continued to January 1, 1910. He has also been successful in real estate, buying and selling farm property in this section: Mr. Moon was appointed postmaster of Cold Brook by President Harrison in 1889, his being the very first appointment made by the president. Mr. Moon was the youngest postmaster in the county at that time. He w as reappointed by President McKinley and served through two terms, to the satisfaction of all concerned. Mr. Moon is a Republican and has taken an active part in public life since he became of age. He was president of the incorporated village of Cold Brook for several years, was made a member of the school board in Cold Brook. In 1909 he was elected sheriff of Herkimer County, an office he now holds. He is a member of Newport Lodge No. 455 Free and Accepted Masons; of Iroquois Chapter No. 263 Royal Arch Masons of Ilion, N. Y., and a chapter member of Sprig Chapter No. 299, Royal Arch Masons of Newport, recently chartered. Mr. Moon is a communicant of the Methodist Episcopal church of Cold Brook, and was largely instrumental in securing for the church a parsonage that is probably the finest specimen of its kind to be found in the State outside of the large cities.


He married September 3, 1889, Nellie Elizabeth Rhodes, of Cold Brook, born June 2, 1869, daughter of Thomas and Ella (French) Rhodes. Ella (French) Rhodes was born September 27, 1846, and was a daughter of Sylvester and Belinda (Straw) French. Belinda (Straw) French was a daughter of Nehemiah and Elizabeth (Norton) Shawl The Nortons are descendants of Sir de Norville, who held an important position under the crown at the time of the Norman conquest. Thomas Tabor Rhodes was born March 14, 1833, father of Mrs. James W. Moon, is a son of Jacob Rhodes, born March 8, 1783, at Marblehead, Massachusetts, and married Sallie Wood, of New Bedford, Massachusetts. Jacob Rhodes was a son of Joseph Rhodes of an old Essex County family. Sallie Wood was a daughter of Thankful Taber, a grand-daughter of Jabez Taber of an old prominent Quaker family of New Bedford. The children of James Wallace and Nellie (Rhodes) Moon were: 1. Stanley S., born June 22, 1894. Both are students in the Herkimer High School. This chapter is the sketches of Moons in the State of New York, by James W. Moon of that state. I have copied the sketches word for word as he gave them, and am hoping that it will be interesting and of some benefit in the future. This information was given to J. W. Moon in 1912 and corresponds with the census report of 1790.


Eight Moon Brothers

THE following sketches of eight Moon brothers who served in the Confederate army will most likely prove interesting reading. On page 69 will be found five of these brothers.


Joseph Moon had eight sons and one grandson in the Confederate army at one time. Those shown in the group picture were the remaining five in 1910. William, LaFayette, DeKalb and Edom volunteered in the fall of 1861 and enlisted at Walnut Grove, Walton County, Ga., in Company G, Thirty-fifth Georgia regiment. George W., Andrew J., and Augustus J. enlisted in the same company in 1863, and Charles K. P. in 1864.


They all returned but Andrew J., who was killed in July, 1863, at Nance's Shop, Va. Dock Knight, who was in the same company, was very nervous and could not stand to hear the bullets whistle, and would run every time he was in an engagement. He was finally court-martialed, blindfolded and ready to be shot, when LaFayette pleaded for his life, telling them that he was not bright and could not help from running when the bullets began to whistle, so he was set free. He was one of the happiest men you ever saw. He always said that the first twenty-five dollars in gold that he ever got he was going to give it to "Fate" (LaFayette Moon) for saving his life, but Dock never succeeded in getting the gold. Later on the Yankees were about to surround this regiment and capture it. They had to run to get away and Dock being a low, short-legged man, could not run very fast. He was "bringing up the rear" and shouting "Oh, Lordy!" at every step.


Before Augustus enlisted he carried a bunch of hands to the salt works in Alabama at Gane's landing on the Tombigbee river and superintended the salt works. This was about the time that the conscript act was passed. One evening a conscripting officer appeared and said all that were subject to being conscripted would be called into the service next morning. Augustus and Jim Shepherd decided they would run away. They walked all night and the next morning found that they had taken the wrong road somewhere and were in three miles of the salt works, the place from which they had started. They made their way to Montgomery to board the first train home. There they run upon the conscript officer and were conscripted and put in the barracks for three days and nights. They were sent from Montgomery to Camp Watts, where they stayed for two days and nights, and then slipped out and left. They boarded a train at West Point, Ga., and found a number of the men who had been conscripted from the salt works on board. The conductor came around for the fares, and the officer said they were all his men, so he got a free ride to Atlanta. He was ready to volunteer but wanted to go home first. He came home to find that his brother, DeKalb a recruiting officer and he enlisted with him and went with him back to Virginia March 15, 1863, and on Sunday morning, May 3, he w as captured. He was a prisoner only ten days when he was exchanged. He then went back to his command in Virginia.


He, with Dink Harmond and James Nunnally, were out foraging one night without a pass. He and Dink had seven canteens apiece to "juice" somebody's cows and get a load of milk. They ran upon a Provost Marshal and had to flee to keep from being caught, but James Nunnally had a crippled leg and he was caught.


During a battle Captain Carter was severely wounded by the explosion of a shell and was thrown upon a stump. Augustus, after: finding him, spoke to him, but got no answer. He straightened him out on the ground and put his hat over his face to keep the sun out. He then made it to a railroad cut, and just as he was in the act of jumping into the cut a shell exploded near him and threw dirt all over him as he went down into the cut.


When Woodson Moon was killed, Gus was lying by his side. George missed Woodson and went back that night to search for him to see if he was dead. He could hear the Union soldiers talking all around him. He found Woodson and got his pocket book, knife and comb.


Andrew enlisted in 1863 and was killed at Nance's Shop in July, 1863. When George learned that he was killed by a Yankee bullet he almost went wild. His comrades had to hold him to keep him from going right on to the Yankee line. He was a brave and fearless soldier and did not mind a close call.


LaFayette was made a lieutenant soon after he enlisted and had several close calls in the Seven Day's fight. He had several bullet holes in his clothing before he was wounded in the arm. He saw Dock Knight, the man whose life he saved, baptized by the chaplain of the Forty-ninth regiment. Dock was hare-lipped and could not talk plain. As the chaplain led him into the water he spied a moccasin snake over the place where he baptized and began to pull back and say, "Don't you see that okerson over there ?" The chaplain not knowing what he said, told him to come along, the water would not hurt him. By this time Dock w as getting too close to the snake, so he jerked loose and said, "Od am it, don't you see that okerson?" The chaplain finally understood what he said, and realizing that he needed to be baptized, stopped and put him under. (One time when the rations were scarce the quartermaster issued his allotment, he sat down and ate it all at once, saying that he we, going to get the good of it while he had it.


DeKalb was as the smallest one of tile boys. One day they could rot locate the Yankees, and the commanding officer called for a volunteer to climb a tall tree to see if any could be seen. DeKalb being small and very active climbed the tree to the very bud and shouted back that he could see Yankees everywhere closing in on them. As he hastened down a command was given to fall in line at once. He has climbed that same tree thirty-nine times since.


Edom was the jolliest one of the boys. He was always playing some kind of prank on all the boys in the camp. If anybody had any fun, he did. He made as fine a clown as you ever saw. He and two or three of his friends built a brush arbor and ran a regular theater while in the camps. Although he weighed over two o hundred pounds he could turn a somersault and catch on his feet, walk on his hands with his feet above his head. He was walking about one day alone and happened to have his gun, when he came to an old house with fifteen Yankees in it. He knew he would be captured if he did not do something and do it quick. He yelled out: "Surround the house, boys." He then went to the door and said, "Throw down your guns and march out double-quick!" They all obeyed orders and marched out. He got behind them and brought them into camp single-handed.


These eight brothers all made good soldiers and loved the cause for which they fought. Thomas Giles testified to this fact, as is seen elsewhere in this book.


There are only two of these brothers living at this date, April 1920, Augustus J., and Charles K. P.


Genealogy

CHRISTINE SAPHRONIA MOON, born October 31, 1905. Her father, John W.; his father, John Willingham; his father, Jesse; his father, Thomas, the emigrant ancestor, making five generations.


William Moon, born about the year 1916; his father, Furman; his father, Augustus; his father, Monroe; his father, William E.; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas, making seven generations.


Irene Irwin was born about the year 1876. Her father, J. Robert; his mother, Susan Moon; her father, Joseph; his father, Thomas, making five generations.


Annie Louise Moon' born March 6, 1904. Her father, Edward T.; his father, Stephen LaFayette; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas, making five generations.


Carter Weaver; his mother, Vera; her mother, Ida J. Carter; her father, Stephen LaFayette; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas, making six generations.


Hubert H. Moon, born 1893. His father, Albert F.; his father, Joseph DeKalb; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas, making five generations.


Joseph Kiskadon; his mother, Betsy; her father, George W. Moon; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas, making five generations.


Jessie Humphries, born in 1886. Her mother, Addie; her


mother, Catherine Moon; her father, Joseph; his father, Thomas making five generations.


-- Rice, its mother, Mary Lizzie; her mother, Mattie Moon; her father, Andrew J.; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas. These are six generations.


Thomas Clifford Lucas, born in 1919; his father, Augustus; his mother, Savannah; her father, Augustus; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas. Of these are six generations.


-- Humphries; its mother, Cloe; her father, Erastus Long; his mother, Josephine; her father, Joseph Moon; his father, Thomas, making six generations.


Cornelius L. Moon; his father, Troy L.; his father, Edom T.; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas. From Cornelius to Thomas are five generations.


Zum Moon; her father, Oscar; his father, Charles K. P.; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas. From Zuma to Thomas are five generations.


Joseph Moon; his father, Franklin Pierce; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas. From Joseph to Thomas are four generations.


---- Nunnally; its father, Stewart; his mother, Marthy; her father, Joseph Moon; his father, Thomas, making five generations.


---- Eubanks; its father, Asa; his mother, Martha; her father, Madison Moon; his father, Jesse; his father, Thomas, these making six generations.


Ramon Clay; his father, David; his father, Henry C.; his mother, Betsie; her father, Jesse Moon; his father, Thomas. These are six generations.


Sadie Joe Stephenson; her mother, Sadie; her father, Albert Sidney J. Moon; his father, Woodson D.; his father, Thomas; his father, Thomas. From Sadie Joe to Thomas are six generations.


Flora Moon, born September 25, 1903; her father, William H.; his father, Stephen LaFayette; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas. From Flora to Thomas are five generations.


Robert L. Moon; his father, Robert L., Sr.; his father, William E.; his father, Joseph; his father, Thomas. From Robert L. to Thomas are five generations.


(Note ---- I give the above short form so as to trace any ancestor at a glance.)


The Bookout Family

WHILE we are working to trace the Moon family, I think it is proper for us to not entirely forget other families who descended from the Moon family, and in order that we may not entirely forget the relationship that some of these families bear to us, I will now attempt to show this relationship.


I have already shown that John Willingham Moon had a half-sister by the name of Sandal and known as "Sallie." She was married to Charles Bookout and resided in Cobb County, Georgia. They had born unto them the following children: Rachael, who married ('Cicero Pool; Lewis, who married Miss Carrie Hill, and they reared a family in Paulding County, Georgia, near the line of Cobb County. To Lewis Bookout were born the following children: John L., who is now dead, but left a family who now resides near the line of Cobb and Paulding Counties. Lewis, who, with his family resides III Texas. Jesse, who resides at Powder Springs, Georgia. Maggie,, who married Joseph Thompson. She is now dead, but left children residing in Atlanta. Cash had only one son, John J., who is at present in the jewelry business in the Arcade building in Atlanta. It will be seen that the Bookout family is closely related to the


Moons. Sandal, or "Sallie," as she was known, was a sister to John W. Moon and her children were first cousins to John F. Moon. The Bookout family continues to use Moon family given names.


The Baggett Family

POLLY, a sister of John Willingham Moon and daughter of Jesse Moon, was married to Burton Baggett, of Cobb County, Georgia. They had born unto them fifteen children. Seven of their sons were in the Confederate army, and several of them died or was killed in the service.


Hiram W. Baggett, for whom the town of Hiram was named, was one of their sons. He married Julia Ward. They had several children who now live in Texas.


Babe Baggett was also one of their sons. He has several children who reside in Cobb County. One of their daughters, Martha, married Isaac Gray, of Paulding County, and they had quite a large family who now resides in Cobb, Paulding and Douglas counties. Another of their daughters, Elizabeth, married John Rakestraw, of Cobb County, Georgia. They had two daughters, Emma, who married John D. Moore. He was a son of Sarah (Moon) Moore, and they had four children. The other daughter of Elizabeth and John Rakestraw, Mattie, was married to W. B. Sorrells and they had six children: Homer, Esker, Henry, Emma, Eunice and Lennie.


Polly (Moon) Baggett had ten sons in the Confederate army.


Cobb County Moon Reunion

HE MOONS OF COBB COUNTY organized a reunion in 1912 at Powder Springs, Ga., and have been meeting annually. In


1917 the meet at Grant Park, Atlanta, for the convenience of the Walton County Moons.


They make their meetings instructive and interesting.


The following are the minutes of the first meeting:


"Powder Springs, Ga., August 31, 1912.


"In response to a call of Z. B. Moon and other members of the family, a large number of the descendants of John Willingham Moon, together with many of their friends, assembled at the pavilion at Powder Springs, Ga., on the above named date, for the purpose of holding a Moon family reunion.


The meeting was called to order by Z. B. Moon, who stated the object of the meeting, after which proceeded to elect permanent officers, as follows: Z. B. Moon, chairman; J. W. Moon, secretary; A. H. Moon, historian, and W. T. Walden, chaplain.


"On motion, it was resolved to hold the reunion annually, the next reunion to be held at Powder Springs on the third Wednesday in July, 1913.


"For the next reunion the following committee on arrangements were named by the chairman: R. D. Moon, D. C. Moon, Woodson D. Bullard, G. S. Elliott, W. T. Walden and M. N. Moon.


"On motion, the following committee on invitation was appointed: Z. B. Moon, J. W. Moon and A. H. Moon.


"Many talks were made by members of the family and by the friends of the family. Notably among those were the talks made by Z. B. Moon, W. T. Walden, James Sorrells, A. J. Ward, A. P. Griggs and others.


"The day was pleasantly spent by all members of the family. Many of the relatives had not met before in several years, and naturally the coming together of so many of these who are bound together by the ties of blood, made the day one that shall long be remembered as one of supreme pleasure.


"About 3:30 p. m., after a few songs and prayer by the chaplain, the meeting adjourned.


"J. W. MOON, Secretary."


Moons Here And There

PLEASANT LAFAYETTE MOON was born near Cartersville, Ga., and was married to Miss Sarah Morris, of Cobb County, Ga., and by this union they had six children: John L., Joseph M., Robert T., Charley M., Carrie D., Pleasant L. Joseph M., and Charlie M. are deceased.


Mr. Moon served in the quartermaster's department in the War Between the States. He was in the mercantile business almost his entire life, starting in Allatoona, Bartow County. He was in the dry goods business for a number of years in Cartersville and Rome. At the latter place he lost the accumulations of most a lifetime in the heavy flood there in 1886. He died about the year 1903, and his wife about four years later. We do not know what branch of the family he came from as his children have no knowledge of their grandfather. Mr. Moon was always very successful in business and so were his boys. Two of his sons made successful lawyers.


P. L. MOON, physician, Atlanta, Ga., son of P. L., and Sarah (Morris) Moon, was born April 12, 1869, and was married to Miss Annie E. Lane, of Troup County, July 7, 1901. She was a daughter of Jerry Lane. By this union they had born unto them two children, Pleasant Leonidus, Jr., born August 27, 1902, and Sarah Annie May, born May 26, 1903.


Dr. Moon graduated from the Atlanta College of Pharmacy in 1888, and graduated from the Atlanta Medical College in 1897, when he began the practice of his profession, with his office located in the eleventh story of the Atlanta National Bank building' where he has built up a good practice. He is a steward in the St. Johns M. E. Church, of Atlanta, Ga., and is also a member of the Atlanta Board of Health, serving his third term.


JOHN L. MOON, lawyer, Atlanta, Ga., son of P. L., and Sarah (Morris) Moon, was married to Mrs. Lizzie Thomas, of Oxford, Ga. They had five children born unto them.


Col. Moon practiced law for a number of years in Atlanta, Ga. Later he joined the North Georgia M. E. Conference, where he has served for a number of years. During this period he preached in Conyers, Ga., one or two years, thence to the Florida conference. He is now retired.


JOSEPH M. MOON, lawyer, Cartersville, Ga., son of P. L., and Sarah (Morris) Moon, was married to Miss Lola Puckett, of Cartersville, Ga., and to them were born two daughters.


Col. Moon was a successful lawyer of this place. He was twice mayor of Cartersville, and judge of the city court. He died in the year 1918.


R. T. MOON, Atlanta, Ga., son of P. L., and Sarah (Morris) Moon, was married to Miss Carrie Payne, of Cartersville, Ga. They have no children.


Mr. Moon has been in the mercantile business all of his life. He was a successful shoe merchant at 29 E. Mitchell street, Atlanta, Ga., where he is carrying a very large stock and assortment of shoes, of all styles and qualities.


CHARLES M. MOON, merchant, son of P. L., and Sarah (Morris) Moon, was married to Miss Hattie Goodwin, and was engaged in the mercantile business. He lost his health in early married life, surviving his wife by two years, and leaving two children Charles A., a lawyer and judge in Muscogee, Oklahoma; a daughter, Mrs. Harry Settle, who lives in Indiana.


CARRIE D. MOON, daughter of P. L., and Sarah (Morris) Moon, was married to Charles L. Baker, of Atlanta, Ga. After his death she was married to N. P. Bruce, of Cartersville, ('a. They now reside in Emerson, Ga., where Mr. Bruce is engaged in the mineral business.


ROBERT MOON, farmer, son of William Moon, was married to Miss Lizzie Moon, a first cousin. He had three brothers, John, James and William. Mr. Moon moved from Jackson County to Oconee County shortly after he married, where he was engaged in farming until his death. They had four sons born unto them. One died of influenza in 1919, one resides in Morgan County. W. C. is a prominent merchant of Farmington, and the others whereabouts is not known.


SANDY MOON, daughter of Madison and Margaret (Calloway) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April] 24, 1868, and was married to J. W. Hawkins December 29, 1887. By this union they had nine children, as follows: Alice, born January 17, 1889; Luke, born March 25, 1892; Fay, born August 1, 1894; Ottie, born November 1, 1897; Arie, born January 6, 1899; Rufus, born November, 1900; Gladys, born January, 1904; Buck, born March, 1908; Pat, born March, 1910.


Mr. Hawkins is a son of Newton Jasper Hawkins who resided sided In Alabama. Mr. Hawkins has followed farming all his life and owns a nice farm in Gwinnett County. He said when he was making preparations to marry he told his mother that he was going to Georgia to marry and make it his home. She asked him who he was going to marry and he told her he was going to marry a Moon. When she learned he was going to marry a daughter of Madison Moon she had no objections, for she and Margaret, his soon-to-be mother-in-law were schoolmates, and thought her to be one of the best women in the world.


The Moon Family

The following is from an article written by Professor A. H. Moon and read at the first annual reunion of the Moon family at Powder Springs, Ga., Saturday, August 31, 1912:


I will here give you briefly such information as I am pretty positive of my authenticity, as to the original descent of the family, whether German, Irish, Scotch, Welsh, Danish or Anglo-Saxon.. We cannot definitely say. It is probable that we are of Dutch or German stock. I am inclined to think that we are the result of the Angles, Danes, Saxons and other tribes that overran Britain about 1500 years after the Roman s had withdrawn their occupation of Britain.


These different peoples, fierce, warlike and barbarous in their natures, who fought, killed, plundered and robbed, were probably our ancestors in the fifth century. From these people have come the Anglo-Saxon race, the most determined, the most resourceful and inventive; the tenacious of liberty and of their right ---- the dominant race of the world; the one leading the world in all the sciences and arts of civilization.


I am quite sure that we are distinctively Anglo-Saxon, both in our origin and characteristics. We then, though wild in the beginning, are the best type of people in the world.


I will now speak of the beginning of the Moon name. The tradition that most of you have heard, I believe, after investigation is substantially correct. From branches of the family all over the United States I find the tradition duly credited.


Until the Norman conquest in 1066 there were no family name*. In literature and history we read of Gurth, Cedric, Egbert, Ethelbert, Rowena, but not until later do we read of people having other names than their given names. The origin of family names is an interesting study. A person to be distinguished from others of the same name were given some name extra to his given name, which came to be applied to his family. In those days all workmen were called smiths, as blacksmiths, silversmiths. There were two Johns in a community. One was a blacksmith, the other was not. They were distinguished by calling one John, the smith, which soon became John Smith. As there were so many workmen, or smiths, which means a workman, people in every community were called John, the smith; Bob, the smith; Sam, the Smith, finally resulting in a large number of Smiths.


About the time the king made a trip through the north and one of the sturdy boroughs furnished him a company of soldiers., several other boroughs likewise furnished him companies. In the battle which was fought and the day was won by one company that showed great bravery and loyalty to the king. One account is that the company of brave soldiers made a deadly and decisive attack on the enemy by the light of the moon, and the other is that they had the picture of the moon painted on their battle flag.


They especially pleased the king, who gave them recognition. Some say he gave them lands. After that time they were referred to as "Moons," and that name was adopted and became the family name. The name was therefore born of bravery and loyalty to the king and patriotism, and therefore one of honor, and should be one of pride.


U. S. Census Report of 1790

There were in the United States in 1790 sixty-nine heads of 1 families by the name of Moon, distributed over the country as follows:


North Carolina, 20; South Carolina, 3; Virginia, 5; Rhode Island, 4; Pennsylvania, 10; Maine, 2; Maryland, l; Massachusetts, 5; New York, 19. Total, 69. The entire population was 428 males over 16 years of age, 185 males under 16 years of age; 128 females, including heads of families, 110.


It will be shown in the foregoing census report that James Moon's family was enumerated all under one head as six free persons.


The names at the beginning of each paragraph show the heads of families and gives the number of males over sixteen, including the heads of families, also number under sixteen, and the number of females, including heads of families.


Since 1790 the census has been taken thirteen times, a period of one hundred and thirty years. During this time the Moon family has increased very rapidly.


This report was compiled by Miss Laura S. Nichols, Genealogist, Washington, D. C., and sent to J. W. Moon at Macon, Ga. She verified as to its correctness. You will notice that all the names in this report are given by J. W. Moon, of Herkimer County, N. Y., in his sketch of the Moons of that State.


The following chapter is the U. S. Census Report of 1790, which gives the number of Moons in America at that date.


North Carolina, Randolph County, Hillsborough District:


John Moon's family consisted of one male over sixteen and four under sixteen, and two females.


Joseph Moon's family, one male over sixteen, six under sixteen and two females.


John Moon's family: One male over sixteen; under sixteen, none; females, none.


Daniel Moon's family: One male over sixteen; under sixteen, none; females , one.


Joseph Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, three; females, five.


Burke County, Morgan District:


Robert Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, two.


Pasquotauk County, Edenton District:


Mrs. Hulda Moon's family: Males over sixteen, none; under sixteen, two; females, five. She owned five slaves.


Martin County, Halifax District:


Priscilla Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, three; females , one.


Chatham County, Hillsborough District:


John Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, four; females, four.


Jacolb Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, five.


James Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under six teen, three; females, three.


James Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, three; females, three.


Thomas Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, three; females, four.


Guilford County, Salisbury District:


Simon Moon's family: Males over sixteen, two; under sixteen, three; females, five.


James Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, none; females, one.


Bladen County, Wilmington District:


Page 188 of the census report shows that James Moon's family was enumerated as six free persons.


New Hancock County, Wilmington District:


Thomas Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, two. He owned fourteen slaves.


Mrs. Sarah Moon's family: Males over sixteen, none; under sixteen, none; females, two. She owned seventy-six slaves.


Bertie County, Edenton District:


John Moon's family: Males over sixteen, two; under sixteen, three; females, three. He owned four slaves.


Cumberland County, Fayetteville Town:


Peter Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, none; females, one.


South Carolina, Dorchester County, Charleston District:


Patrick Moon's family: Males over sixteen, four; under sixteen, three; females, seven. He owned five slaves.


Fairfield County, Camden District:


William Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, five; females, two.


Edgefield County, Ninety-Sixth District:


Jacob Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, none; females, none.


Virginia, Albemarle County:


William Moon, Sr.: White souls, ten; dwellings, five; other buildings, five.


Amherst County:


William Moon: White souls, eight; dwellings, one; other buildings, one.


Northumberland County:


William Moon: White souls, four; dwellings, one; other buildings, none.


Cumberland County:


Stephen Moon: Whites, five; blacks, none.


(Note ---- The 1790 census of Virginia was among those destroyed by the British. This is the only Virginia list in existence. In all the other states, the headings refer to persons, while this list covers buildings, etc.)


Rhode Island, Kent County, West Greenwich Town:


James Moon's family:. Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, one; females, one.


Oliver Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, three; females, three.


Washington County, Exeter Town:


Ebenezer Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, none; females, two.


Sanford Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen:, three; females three. Those in the town of Exeter spelled their name Moone.


Pennsylvania, York County, Reading township:


Edward Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, two.


Cumberland County, Hopewell township:


Henry Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen , two; females, three.


Buck County, (not enumerated by township):


James Moon' family: Males over sixteen, four; under sixteen, three; females, five.


James Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, two; females, four.


William Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, two; females, four.


Timothy Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, three.


Jasper Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, four; females, four.


Samuel Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, four; females, five.


Northumberland County:


Nathaniel Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, three.


Bedford County:


James Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, three. Name spelled Moone.


Maine, Hancock County, Sullivan Town:


Thomas Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, one; females, four.


Joseph Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, none; females, two.


Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore Town:


William Moon's family: Males over sixteen, two; under sixteen, three; females, five.


Massachusetts, Berkshire County, Stockbridge Town:


Benjamin Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, three; females, five.


Tyringham Town:


Abraham Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, three; females, one.


Lee Town:


Joseph Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under six-. teen, three; females, four.


Hampshire County, Cummington Town:


John Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, one.


Suffolk County, Boston Town:


George Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, two.


New York, Albany County, Ballstown (now Ballston):


Benijah Moon's family: Males over sixteen, two; under sixteen, four; females, two.


Alpheus Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females , five.


Freehold Town:


John Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, two; females, two.


Stephentown:


Peleg Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, none; females, three.


Jobe Moon's family: Males over sixteen, two; under sixteen, one; females, three.


Anna Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, one; females, two.


Minjah Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, two.


John R. Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, none; females, one.


Half Moon Town:


William Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, three; females, six.


Columbia County, Claverack Town:


Henry Moon's family ; Males over sixteen, two o; under sixteen, one; females, two.


Hillsdale Town:


John Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, one.


Montgomery County, Canajoharie Town:


Darius Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, two.


Dutchess County, Beekman Town:


Matthew Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, one; females, two.


John Moon's family: Males over sixteen, three; under sixteen, two; females, eleven.


Robert Moon's family: Males over sixteen, four; under sixteen two; females, three.


John Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen one; females, three.


New York County, East Ward, New York City:


Michael Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one ;under sixteen, none; females, none.


Elizabeth Moon's family: Males over sixteen, one; under sixteen, none; females, three. She owned four slaves.


JOHN D. MOORE


John D. Moore, Cedartown, Polk County, Georgia, son of Jacob O. Moore, who married Sarah N. E. Moon in 1850, a daughter of John Willingham Moon. They had nine children. Mr. Moore married a Bakestraw, her grandmother was a Moon, sister of John Willingham Moon. They had five children: John T., who lives in Atlanta; T. W., who lives in Brooklyn, N. Y., and three daughters who reside in Atlanta.


Biographical Sketch of Joseph Moon

THE following is an article written by a grandson of Joseph T Moon, and was published in the Walton News, Monroe, Ga., May 19, 1892:


By request of several citizens, I send to the News this sketch of Walton's oldest citizen, Mr. Joseph Moon. I visited him on last Saturday and found him well and exceedingly stout for a man who has seen the spring flowers blossom four-score and fifteen times.


Mr. Moon was born in Columbia County, Georgia, October 16, 1796. His father was a native of North Carolina and lived to be 96 years old. Joseph was the youngest of twelve children, one of which lived to be 93, and several others averaged 70. He moved to Walton County in 1824 , and located in Buncomb District, near where he now lives, four miles southwest of Loganville.


He was married to his first wife, Miss Edith Hutson' when he was a little over 29 years of age. They lived together until her death seven years afterwards. He lived a widower two years, and was married to Miss Martha Jones. She died in 1871, and he was left a widower again. In 1873 he was married to his present wife, Miss Luranie Thompson, he being at that time 77 years old. He had five children by his first wife and fifteen by his second wife. He has fourteen children living, ninety-nine grandchildren, seventy great-grandchildren and seven great-great-grandchildren, living at present.


He had eight sons to enlist in the Confederate Army, in 1861, all in Company G, of the Thirty-fifth Georgia regiment, and after fighting in almost every battle until the surrender at Appomattox, all lived to get home but one.


Mr. Moon cast his first vote in 1817, and voted for Andrew Jackson for President in 1824, and has voted in every Presidential election since, and desires to live to vote against the Third Party this fall. He has always voted the Democratic ticket, and says the Democratic principles have ever been and will continue to be the noblest of all. He served on the jury for thirty years. He has forgotten who was judge at the first time he served, but says as well as he can remember that Orian Strowd summoned him to serve on the first grand jury, while Egbert Bell was foreman.


He has never held any office except Justice of the Peace for several years; he has never followed anything but farming, and has always been very temperate. He never has been a very hearty cater and never drank but little water. In his younger days he could plow all day in the warmest weather without drinking any water except at noon.


He has been smoking tobacco for 45 years, but never smoked more than three times a day, and that is just after eating. He has never had any sickness, and was very stout in his young days, and generally weighed about 150 pounds, and weighs 125 pounds at the present time.


Mr. Moon joined the Baptist church in 1868, at Sharon, and has been a devoted Christian ever since , and is now only waiting to be summoned to a better land. He and his wife, who is 64 years old, are living by themselves, and he hitched up his horse and carried her to the store to do some trading last Friday. I asked him if he could see to read and he said, "Well, I can read capital letters and big figures, but can't read common reading."


He never lies down during the day, but can sit and sleep for hours in his chair He has in his possession a Bible that his father used, and no doubt it is 150 years old. It was printed before our present style came into use and the esses were printed like fs. Among other old relics I found, while looking over his old papers, were some almanacs printed in 184O, and a letter written by a young lady 75 years ago. Mr. Moon's appetite is good and he bids fair to outlive his five-score years.


When asked how it was that he lived to be so old, he said that he had always tried to live right, and never had thought but little about dying and said he always loved his wife, and that nothing is as healthy as true love. GRANDSON.


Loganville, Ga., March 19, 1892.


Descendants of Joseph Moon

THESE DESCENDANTS up to the date of this publication number 630, with 500 living, or 92 per cent. This is an estimate and is approximately correct. Of these six are lawyers. two judges, two justices of the peace, ten teachers, two civil engineers, eight carpenters, three music teachers, two jewelsmiths, two served a term each in the State Senate, one licensed preacher, and 85 per cent farmers and farm laborers' which is the highest calling, for 'the farmer feeds and clothes the world.


Twelve of Joseph's children that are dead lived to a total age of 810 years, an average of 671/2 years. One lived to be 86, and the one that was killed in the Civil War was only 23.


Other Families Who Descended From the Moon Family

N.V. PARISH married Narcissa L. Bullard, daughter of W. M. and Lucy Ellen Bullard, of Cobb County, Georgia.


Her mother, Lucy Ellen Bullard, was a daughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Cole) Moon, of Cobb County.


Mr. and Mrs. Parish were married November 13, 1881, and had born unto them thirteen children: Rufus E., born August 31,1882; Leola C., born April 23, 1884; Lemon H., born March 29, 1886; Lucy J., born June 15,1887; Myrtie M., born April 24,1889; Herbert R., born June 19, 1891; Nellie V., born May 8,1893; Stella 31.. born October 20,1894; Quincy J., born August 10, 1896; Ruby E., I born September 11, 1898; Nora H., born November 10, 1900; Grace J., born June 4,1902; Willie W., born November 20,1905.


Rufus E., oldest son of N. V. and Narcissa Parish, married Amanda Kirk January 4, 1902, and had two children: R. Edward and Mary E. After the death of his wife he was married to Miss Georgie Jarmon and by this union they had two children, Randolph and Bertha L.


Leola Parish, daughter of N. V. and Narcissa Parish! was married to E. G. Wood April 21,1911. One child, Rufus E., Jr.


Herbert R. Parish and Miss Mattie Rowell were married on December 25, 1909. One child, Florine.


Lucy J. Parish was married to a Mr. Emmett on December 25, 1910.


Myrtie Parish was married to Charles J. Fanin June 21, 1908, and had two children, Etta May and Irene L.


CYNTHIA VICTORIA MOON


CYNTHIA VICTORIA MOON, daughter of Elder Isaac N. Moon, was born January 16,1867, and was married to Silas Casey


Holland on December 6, 1888. By this union they had three children: Lydia Cynthia, Hattie Gertrude and Mary Victoria.


Hattie Gertrude married James E. Estes, and they had one child born unto them, Herbert Durell.


Mary Victoria was married to Shirley Adams on May 17, 1912.

Note: Nearly one-half of the population of Walton, Cobb and Paulding counties are Moons and descendants of the Moon family. The reason of this is that Jesse Moon our great generator of the Moons, emigrated from Columbia County to Walton and thence over into Alabama, scattering twenty children in his pathway. John Willingham, son of Jesse, emigrated from Columbia to Walton and then to Cobb, leaving seventeen children in his path. Joseph stopped in Walton and raised twenty children.


Early English Family History

THE following history of the Moon family is from the pen of Joseph B. Moon, of Powder Spring, Ga., and is furnished us by J.P. Moon, a grain and provision merchant of Newberry, S. C.


At the time Denmark was controlled by England the King of England made a requisition on the King of Denmark for a regiment of soldiers to act as bodyguard to the English king.


The Danish King, feeling himself complimented, issued his order that the best men of his kingdom should be selected and that every man should be tall, standing erect, blue eyes, fair complexion and red hair.


This order was filled to the letter and the men were of the first families of the Danish kingdom and upon the banner which they carried with them in addition to the national colors and inscriptions there was inscribed a full half-moon and from that circumstance it was called the Moon Regiment.


After having done good service for the English King he was so well pleased with them that when their term of service expired he offered them land in England if they would remain with him, which offer quite a number accepted and were settled in a colony and all with one accord adopted the name of the honored regiment and became Moons. The land is held by their posterity to this day. The land grant was made in that name, Moon. From this time we find the Moon colony leading moral, civil and prosperous lives, devoting a share of their time to religious culture. When George Fox, Robert Barkly and others rebelled spiritually against the priesthood and ceremonies of the prevailing church of that day and in the persecutions which followed we find a number of the Moons true to their religion. When William Penn formed his colony in Pennsylvania we find he established a colony of Moons in Bucks County and from this colony we trace the Moon family direct to Redstone, western Pennsylvania, western New York, and one branch of the family to Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio and Georgia. Joseph Moon was the first to migrate from the colony. He was married before leaving the old world.


He had one son whose name was Simon. Simon was twice married and by his second wife had an only child a son whose name was John, and who emigrated to North Carolina and married Mary Farmer.


They had few sons; Joseph, Lawrence, John and James and one daughter, Rachael, who married Marniduke Bookout. John Moon the father, emigrated to Georgia where he died. John Moon, the son of John, begat Jesse Moon, who was twice married; two sisters Willingham by name, and begat many sons and daughters, one named John Willingham Moon; a son by his first wife begat Joseph K. Moon, and his brother, Joseph K. Moon, begat Zadoc B. Moon.


JOSEPH B. Moon


Powder Spring, Ga., January 22, 1889.


Sowing and Reaping

BE not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. (Galatians 6-7.) This is true whether there is any God at all or not. This would have been as true if you had found it in Grier's Almanac, as it is true, found in the word of God; that would have been as true if Socrates had said it as it is true as God says it; that is true whether there is anything else true in the moral universe or not. This is true in the physical world about us. This is true in all nature around us.


Whatever you sow, that you reap. If I go into my field and sow wheat I don't expect to reap anything but wheat; if I sow oats I will reap oats; if I sow peas I will reap peas. We are very careful in selecting seed; that they are perfectly sound and well developed so they will germinate and make a strong and healthy plant. Now, let us notice the multiplying nature of the seed sown. I found in my field a bunch of wheat that had twelve stems which produced as many heads, and each head averaged fifty grains, making six hundred from one single grain. These six hundred grains would multiply to three hundred and sixty thousand. Seed sown that have good or bad influence is bound to multiply in the same ratio. Every word we utter, every deed, or every act of our lives is a seed sown. If we sow a seed that has a bad influence, just as soon as it passes from the hand of the sower it is gone forever and its influence will multiply as it is handed down from one generation to another anti cannot be recalled. We are not going through this country scattering these seeds in the valleys or on the hillsides, but we are scattering them in human hearts, and they come up and produce anti reproduce, just like the seed we sow, so we must be careful as to the kind of seed we sow.


Away back yonder in the Garden of Eden, six thousand years ago, Adam dropped one little seed of sin in the Garden of Eden and today this world is full of sin and woe. Like not only begets its like, but we know it is the multiplying nature of the seed sown


This is just as true in the moral universe as it is in the physical universe.


Every man and w omen carries about with them a basket of spiritual seeds, and every step in their lives their hand goes down


into the basket, and they are scattering the seeds to there right and to the left, and they come up and grow off, and produce and reproduce after their kind; and the iniquity, abominations and wickedness of the community.


When I know the moral status and the moral life of a community, I would know something of its history-the previous history of that community. If you will tell me what kind of seed have been sown in a community in the last twenty years, I will tell you what the harvest will be. Just as truly as if you told me what kind of seed you put in the ground, I will tell you then what sort of harvest will be in the field.


Sow profanity reap profanity. Every little profane boy that blights the morals of a community is a living witness that if you sow profanity you will reap profanity. God pity the man who will swear in the presence of his children. I have not been able in all my life to know why anyone should want to use profane language. I have actually heard some men say that they could not get a mule to mind them unless they cursed it' and they really believed it. W/hen they use this language they are angry with the mule and speak in a harsh and abrupt voice that gets a move on the animal. If they were to use the words, "God bless your soul" in the same harsh voice the mule would go just the same. It is alarming to know how many men and boys use this language-even very small boys use it.


What a pity! what a sacrilege! that a young mind should be filled with it. Someone is responsible for it by sowing such seed. Oh, how much better it would be to carry good influences in their dives that would be an honor to them and a pleasure to their associates!


"Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap." God through all of his handiwork of nature is calling us to nobler and higher things. He is whispering to us through nature to carry living influences in our lives that will live on and on after we are dead.


When we look at the beautiful flowers as the dew sparkles upon them, they seem to whisper to us, "See how beautiful I am?


See how people admire me?" Then how in your life. As we behold the sun rising in all of its glory and brilliancy, and view it as it climbs the slippery steeps of the horizon, shining brighter and brighter, onward and upward, and seems to whisper to us. "See my pathway! How is yours?" Own ward and onward shining brighter and brighter, until it reaches the meridian and calls to us, "See, I have completed half of my journey perfectly. How is yours?" Onward it continues its journey until it sinks behind the western hills and seems to whisper back to us, "I have completed my journey, I filled my mission, I have been a shining light unto you. See how bright my pathway! How is yours ?"


It must be a sad thought indeed, when a man comes to the close of life and realizes that he has not carried a single good influence in his life and realizing that he has sown corrupt seed and lived a blank life from the beginning to the end, and that there will be nothing left to his memory but a crumbling tombstone. The saddest thought of tongue or pen is "it might have been."


What a contrast in a life like this and the one that Paul lived. No doubt that he realized he had fulfilled his mission and had done all the good he could when he wrote "For I am now ready to be offered, and the time of my departure is at hand. I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith; henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness." This is a glorious thought for a man, when he realizes that his life is about spent and can look back over his past life and know that he will reap a crown in Glory from the good seed he has sown, while his influence will live on and on after he has passed over the river.


I will pause here and draw a picture. When the sun sinks beyond the western hills, and the dark shadows gather around about us, it reminds us that we had an opportunity to sow some good seed, but this day is gone forever and cannot be recalled. This is a sad thought indeed. After the evening repast we sit on our porches talking over past and future events. We hear a low, rumbling noise far back in the southwest, and when we cast our eyes in that direction, we e behold a dark, angry cloud approaching with great rapidity, the lightning begins to flash and the thunders peal. The fierce winds roar through the forest and the heavy raindrops patter upon our roofs, and the whole world seems to be a solid mass of darkness. How sad and gloomy everything seems! This pictures to our minds a blank and wasted life. "Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap." When we awaken from our slumber we behold the dark, angry clouds have rolled in splendor and the blessed sunshine peeps in at our windows, the beautiful flowers raise their heads as the dew sparkles upon them as if they were giving thanks to God for the light of another day. The birds sing their sweet melodies as they twitter from branch to branch; the bees hum around, the honeysuckle that entwine our porches. Everything seems to be running over with joy, peace and happiness. This pictures to our minds a life full of influence, inspiration and happiness, a life in which we feel we are benefited by the association with such a beautiful life. "Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap." Every man, woman and child is bound to sow some kind of seed and as sure as they sow they are bound to reap. They will not only reap what they sow here in this world, but will reap what they sow in the great beyond. We can see this demonstrated in our everyday life. For instance, Mr. A was reared among bad influences, and lived a dissipated life, and drank, gambled and used profane language and all other kinds of vices in the presence of his boys. What else could he expect but to reap a harvest in his old days. When he retires at night he does not know where his boys are and what they are doing. The news may come at any moment of some bad crime that they have committed, as he spends sleepless hours reaping what he has sown. Perhaps one of them in a drunken rage shoots down one of his neighbors' boys and the strong arm of the law convicts him of murder and hangs him. Then there are two newly-made graves, a broken-hearted father, mother and sisters. "Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap."


Again, taking the reverse side of this picture: When we read the biographies of our greatest men we see this great truth demonstrated by the good seed that they have sown. George Washington, the father of his country, was first in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen, and carried an influence in his life that lives today. His name is made to echo by the youths of this country in every school building of this republic. When the passenger boats ply up and down the Potomac river, as they pass his tomb at Mt. Vernon, all heads are uncovered in reverence to his memory. Napoleon Bonaparte said, "Posterity will talk of Washington with reverence, as the founder of a great republic, when my name shall be lost in the vortex of revolution." This is not the Washington that I would picture to your minds, but the Washington that hacked his father's cherry tree, and said, "Father, I did it. I cannot tell a lie." I do not refer you to George Washington as the first president of the United States, but I would picture him to you as a barefoot plow boy when he was molding that great character under the influence of his mother.


Before I conclude this chapter I want just a word to the boys and girls, for they are the men and women of tomorrow. You live in an age of light and knowledge, an age in which science and arts are marching onward with gigantic stride. The greatest thing that you can possess is a noble character. Great opportunities and possibilities lay just before you, and all that you have to do is to grasp them. Now is the time, while you are young, to avoid and break away from slang and vulgar expressions and all other bad habits, for when they are once fixed you will carry them through life. Be very careful as to the seed you sow for you will be bound to reap what you sow in old age. Press forward, go and gather laurels on the hills of science, drink deep of her crystal fountain, join in the march of fame, love God and serve him and you will be happy.


Profanity

WHAT IS PROFANITY ? It appeals to me very forcibly, that if everyone knew the real definition of profanity and its effect on mankind, they would, I am sure, abstain from its use. Profanity is the violation of anything that is sacred, or treating it with abuse, irreverence, obloquy or contempt, as to profane the name of God. "Thou shalt not take the name of thy God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain." (Exodus 20-7.) This is one of the first commandments. He tells us not to take his name in vain before he says thou shalt not kill. In the order that He puts the Commandments, it makes profanity a greater violation of His law than murder; then how can any one's conscience let them use it? It is a wish or prayer of the wicked that is not granted, for the prayer of the wicked availeth nothing. We very often hear a profaner calling on God to damn one's soul. O what a sacrilege! This is enough to make the hair rise on your head or the blood to boil in your veins to think of such a thing. Let us pause here just a moment and see what it would mean if we had the power to cause a man's soul to be damned and sent to eternal punishment. This is just what it means: When we hear a profaner use this language. What authority has a man to use this language? The Bible condemns it. Our statute laws condemn it and our best citizens condemn it. Is it not good English, l French or any other kind of language. It is a succession of meaningless words and takes longer to express a thought. Even some church members take the name of the Lord in vain. Every consecrated man and every good citizen ought to use every good influence possible to suppress this great and growing evil. Every father and mother must teach their children around the fireside the evil of this great sin. All the girls could band themselves together and refuse to keep company with a boy that profanes God's name.


It would be a grand day in the world's history if the news were o flash over the wires that America had been made free from profanity by the influence of our good women.


Life

Looking back upon the past ages of the world and the generation after generations of the human race that have passed away, the brevity of human existence and the insignificance of individual influence comes apparent. True, there are instances of men whose names and actions are still quoted for their power and influence in their lives, but to each one of these are millions who lived and died, forgotten centuries ago, or whose name now lives only upon a crumbling tombstone. Life after life has passed and faded. Each one filled for a time its niche in the world, performed its portion of labor, felt its share of pain and pleasure, and then passed away to the grave that waits for all. While nature smiled unchanged through centuries, the sun shone, the rain fell, the trees waved in graceful beauty, man came and passed away like a cloud over the heavens, forgotten as the vapor is forgotten when the sun absorbs it in its glorious rays. While we live nature will smile; when we die the sunlight still will fall upon our graves, and the great works of creation take note of our loss. For us the world still offers the attractions she presented to our ancestors, and w-hen our names are forgotten the same pleasures will await coming generations. Only a short time and the end will come to us, as it has come to our predecessors. Only a little while and the throbbing heart will be still, the busy brain will cease to plan and the active hand will be passive. The gap our loss made for a brief time will be filled, songs and laughter will fall from the lips we were wont to caress. Joy will take the place of mourning, and w e shall be forgotten, if we don't make life worth while. Life is what we make it. God created us in his own image and placed us here to fill a certain mission and made us of the highest type and ruler over everything that creepest on the earth. We ought to feel honored by this thought to be inspired to do greater things. Nevertheless, some days may be dark and dreary, we must look on the bright side of life, for beyond the darkest clouds the sun still shines. We ought to be a happy people, for everything we need is put here at our command. We are furnished with pure air to breathe and pure water to drink, sunshine and rain to make vegetation grow. After all, this old world is a happy place if we will make it so. It is a place to prepare ourselves for the world to come.


We can elevate ourselves step by step by building a spotless character and live a life of usefulness and influence, or we can live a life of vice and corruptness that we will be placed in the very depths of degradation and ruin. Therefore, life is bound to be just what we make it.


Advice to the Younger Generation

NEARING the fiftieth milestone in life and looking back to my boyhood days, and looking at the boys and girls as they launch out on life's journey, I feel that I may be able to give some advice.


God has created you in His own image, He has created you just a little below the Angels, He has given you mental and spiritual faculties to lift you above the brute and make you an exalted and noble spiritual being. These faculties are given and left to your own free will. You will go as far below the brute as these faculties, rightly used, would lift you above it. The first thing you should seek is a character; then you have a firm foundation on which to build a vocation. An unstable man can never be a person of character. Seek to have some definite aim in life and strive with all o! your energies to master it and rise above your predecessor, for there is always room at the top. Remember that the crowded places are at the foot of the hill and a little farther up where so many give up and fall out in despair. Be diligent in all things and take advantage of every opportunity. If you fail to heed these truths, when you reach middle age, you will then realize that you have made a very grave mistake when it is too late. You will pass through this world only one time and you cannot turn back to right a wrong. You arc not doing your duty in this age of progress if you do not excell your foreparents, for your opportunities are greater. You may often find your pathway full of obstructions but you must push them aside and keep pressing on toward the goal.


Cyrus W. Field labored for almost ten years under all kinds of difficulties and disappointments, but he never gave up till he had united the old world with the new with the telegraph cable, which was pronounced one of the greatest feats of human skill.


Remember that the harder the struggle the greater the victory.


Form good habits early in life. Among the habits to be acquired are the habits of studying properly, of concentrating the mind, of learning self-control, and above all, of contentment. The agony to be endured hereafter, of which theology tells, is no worse than the agony we make for ourselves in this world by habitually fashioning our character in the wrong way. Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state.


You are spinning your own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone. It will be very sad indeed when you make a mistake in life by forming a bad habit and having to regret it when it is too late. You can eliminate this by thinking before you act.


The Author's Note

I have labored under extreme difficulties in getting out this book. In seeking for data I have written over one hundred letters to various parts of the United States, and very often would have to write the second or third time before I would get a reply. I have endeavored to make it as authentic as I possibly could. If I only knew that these pages would inspire some of the readers I would [eel that this very tedious task of writing this volume will not be in vain.


It is now my pleasant task to acknowledge the kindness and courtesy of those who have been so kind and willing to furnish me with such data that I asked for, and will ever remember you for the same. I thank you very kindly.

 


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