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THE MOONS AND KINDRED FAMILIES

By John William Moon

Stein Printing Company
Atlanta, Georgia
Copyright, 1930

THE MOONS AND KINDRED FAMILIES


A genealogical history of the Moon Family, with interesting records of several related families, including the Baldwins, Bookouts, Coles and Winstons, embracing a period of more than one thousand years, showing descent of the family from King Charles the Bald, of France, and from the Duke of Flanders; also relationship on maternal lines to Alfred the Great; William the Conqueror; Baldwin the First, King of Jerusalem and Baldwin the First, Emperor of Constantinople.

By J. W. Moon
956 Stewart Avenue, S.W.,
Atlanta, Ga.

PREFACE
It has been the purpose of the writer to assemble in this volume material upon which the Moon family may rely for truth and accuracy as to its origin and descent. It is believed that in the main this end has been attained, yet in a field of original research, almost entirely unexplored, and in many instances with the object sought almost obscured by the obliterating hand of time it would be too much to expect perfection.

It is believed that all of the Moons of America and of England have a common origin, in the Mahans, and that all Moons wherever located are but different branches of one family.

The names of many children of the Moons are not in the book because parents have neglected to furnish their names, although it has been generally known for years that a family history was being prepared.

It is hoped that this will not be regarded as the complete family history, but rather the foundation upon which some more gifted writer may some time write a complete history.

Persons interested in tracing their ancestry and desiring the aid of a dependable genealogist will please communicate with J. W. Moon, 956 Stewart Avenue, S.W., Atlanta, Ga.

A copy of this book may be obtained by addressing the author.

THE MOONS AND KINDRED FAMILIES

Origin of the Name of Moon

Extensive and diligent research has been made for information as to the origin of the name of Moon; the libraries have been searched and every available book in the origin of family names has been perused, and all of the writers agree that Moon is a corruption of Mahan. There is such unanimity among them as to compel the conclusion that they are correct. Both French and English writers agree that the Mahans came from Normandy, where their name originated, to England. In Normandy they were "de Mahans," but after coming to England they dropped the "de." A. Reginald de Mohun (Mahan) resided in Devonshire, England, in the year 1220. This is the first record we find of the family in England, though it is probable that they came over with William the Conqueror. According to the writers above referred to, the name was first deMahan, then Mahan, then Mahun, then Mohun, Mohon, Mayon, Moyne, Munn, Moun, Mooun, Moone, Moon. That the name in evoluting from Mahan to Moon passed through these various changes is declared to be correct by several English writers of highest repute.

The foregoing statement as to the origin of the name is confirmed by the fact that a Coat of Arms was issued by the King of England at a very early date, about 1350, to "Moone, Moun or Moyne." The following is a description of the Coat of Arms: "Ar. a cross engr. sa. crest-a bear." The fact that all three of the names, Moone, Moun and Moyne, appears in the Coat of Arms seems conclusive that all three of the names refer to one and the same family, and illustrates the evolution of the name from Mahan to Moon, and would authorize the Moons of the present time to adopt and use the same as the Moon family Coat of Arms by right of inheritance. The Moone whose name appears in the above Coat of Arms is the first that we find of the name in England. Devonshire appears to be the place of origin of the name of Moon, and it was in Devonshire that we find the first Mahans, or Mohuns, and it is most probable, almost a certainty that the first Moon was a descendant of A. Reginald de Mohun. The progenitors of the Moon family in America came from Devonshire or descended from the Moons of Devonshire.

While it appears to be established as a fact that the name of Moon is a corruption of Mahan, but since there is a different story as to the origin of the name, that is more or less generally known, we deem it proper to give the reader the benefit of this story, as follows:
"Once there was a time when England and Denmark were ruled by the same king, and during a certain war in England requisition was made on Denmark by the king for a Company of soldiers. These soldiers were selected with great care from the very best families in Denmark. Each soldier was erect in stature, athletic, brave and of a determined mind; of light complexion, blue eyes, red hair and not less than six feet tall. The banner under which they fought, in addition to the national colors, had the inscription of a half moon. They are said to have fought a battle by the light of the moon, and to have won a great victory, which pleased the king so much that he granted lands to all who would settle in England. According to this story several years of them accepted the offer and settled in a colony. After this they were all known as Moons, and Moon became established as their family name."
The above story has already been disproven by English writers, heretofore quoted. Then, too, if it had been true, the incident must have occurred during the reign of King Canute, which began in the year 1015, and we are unable to find the name of a single person by the name of Moon in English literature of history for more than three hundred years after this time. This disproves the story. And again if the story be true there were many persons at this early date by the name of Moon, who were of no blood kin. The world would now contain many thousands of Moons who had no common origin, and of course would have no family characteristics in common. Whereas, all of the Moons in America of whom we have any knowledge have certain characteristics and family resemblances which prove their common origin.

Racial Origins of the Moons

From the foregoing we have learned that the ancestors of the Moons were located in France at the time of the adoption of the family name of Mahan, nearly a thousand years ago, however we know that they were not of French origin. The characteristics of the family as well as family tradition, and all information obtainable indicates that out ancestry came originally from Denmark. Then if we are of Danish origin we have only to learn something of the origin of the Danes in order to know something of the origin of the Moons. The Danes are of Teutonic origin of the Scandinavian group. They have light hair, blue eyes and fair skin. Little is known of the primitive history of Denmark. The kitchen middens and other primitive remains indicate the early presence of prehistoric man in the Danish peninsula. The sagas hand down traditions of later bust still early ages when the original inhabitants had been crowded out by wandering tribes of Germanic stock, and Jutland and the Islands had become the homes of Angles, Saxons and Jutes. This was probably completed about the second century of the Christian era, but was followed by an invasion of the Danes in the fifth and sixth centuries. Less influenced than other Teutonic peoples by the Romans, the inhabitants of the Scandinavian countries developed a striking and characteristic civilization, marked by a warlike and adventurous spirit that sent them as vikings and conquerors over most of Europe and even as far away as America. As evidence of their daring it is claimed that Lief Ericson, a Scandinavian, crossed the Atlantic Ocean in row boats and discovered America in the year one thousand.

Doubtless the spirit of the adventurer has been inherited from their viking ancestors by the Moons, and accounts for their presence in nearly every country in Europe, at an early date, as pioneers, and sent them to Jamestown, Virginia, and other American settlements or colonies upon their establishment. The Moons are truly a pioneer family and may be found in many countries pushing forward the advance lines of civilization. The Moons have also inherited another characteristic of their Teutonic-Danish ancestors, a large majority of them down to the present time have fair skin, light hair and blue eyes.

From the very earliest records of the Mahuns, or Mohuns, in England, we find them occupying positions of prominence. On many of them titles of Nobility were conferred, before their names became Moon. The title of Baron was conferred on five different Mahans, of which we have found record, perhaps there were others. Many Coats of Arms were granted to the Mahuns.

After the family name had become Moon, we find the family still occupying a high position in England. Among the early records that we find of the name of Moon, one of the first, is an account of the granting of a Coat of Arms to a Moone, of the county Devon, in the fourteenth century. The following is a description of this Coat of Arms:

"Ar. an Eagle displayed, sa. beaked and legged, or on a chief of the second three crescents erm."

A little later we find that a Coat of Arms was granted to another Moon of County Devon, described as follows:

"Per fesse gu. and az, three crescents, ar."

We will again ask the reader to remember that the progenitors of most of the American Moons came from County Devon, and we feel that we have a right to claim for the Moon family of America the privilege by right of descent of adopting and using the above as the Moon Family Coat of Arms. A number of other Coats of Arms were granted by the English Government to the Moons of England. One of which is described as follows:

"Or. a cross engr. sa. a label or semee of hurts. Crest-An arm holding a fleur de lis, or."

Another Coat of Arms is described as follows:

"Gu. a maunch erm charged with a sinquefoil, or."

Full descriptions of the foregoing Coats of Arms and many others, which were issued to Mahans and Moons may be seen in "The General Armory of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and in Burks General Armory."

MOON FAMILY HISTORY

From an early date onward we see the Moons of England leading honorable, prosperous lives, devoting a portion of their time to the moral and religious culture of the then superstitious people, and becoming prominently identified with the social and business affairs of England. Many of them won high places in the professions, especially of the law and medicine. Quite a number of them have held very high places in the English Government. Peter Moon, born in 1548 was a poet of considerable distinction, and wrote many sacred poems. He had a sister Amy, who married Thomas Tusser. Sir Francis Graham Moon, 1796-1881, was Lord Mayor of London. The King conferred on him the title of Baron, with a Coat of Arms and heraldry, a recognition rarely bestowed in England, except to those born of the nobility. There was a Sir Richard Moon, who by hard struggles became the organizer of England's greatest railroad system. He is recognized as the greatest railroad genius that England has produced, and may fitly be placed in the same class with Harriman and James J. Hill. William Moon, born in the year 1818 was one of the world's greatest benefactors. He invented what is known as the Moon Embossed System of Raised Letters for the Blind. Mr. Moon lost one of his eyes when he was four years old, and the other was affected until he could see but little, and finally he lost the sight of this eye altogether when he was quite a young man. He devoted his life and great ability to perfecting and putting into operation his system for enabling the blind to read. He traveled a great deal and established schools for the blind. He visited America, and the first school for the blind, in America, was established by him. He first translated the Bible into the Irish and Chinese languages and published the same for the blind. Eventually before his death he translated parts of the Bible into 476 languages, and published these, together with many other books and papers for the blind, and at his death in 1894 he provided by Will for continuing the operation of his printing plant, which is still being done under the management of his daughter. He always sold books for less than the cost of printing, the deficiency being made up by charitable contributions.

At the present time there are many Moons of prominence in England; below are the names of a few of them taken from "Who's Who."

Robert Oswold Moon, Physician, English National Hospital for Diseases of the Heart. He is one of England's most distinguished physicians. Sir Ernest Robert Moon, K. C. B., L. L. B, Counselor to the Speaker since 1908. Joseph Agnew Moon, Surgeon in the Royal Navy, awarded medal for distinguished service in the Boxer uprising in China; Japan also conferred the Order of the Japanese Red Cross, D.S.O., battle of Jutland, World War; also St. Stanislaus with Swords. Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Moon, title of conferred by England in 1916; rendered distinguished military service to England during World War

Sir Arthur Moon, W. G., Sir Cecil Ernest Moon, Second Baronet created 1887. Edward Robert Pacey Moon, prominent in English Church, State, Civic and Commercial affairs.

THE MOON FAMILY

Captain Thomas Moon

Thomas Moon, Captain of the ship Christopher, was Sir Francis Drakes most trusted officer. Drake says that he could trust Captain Moon, more than he could his own brother, John Drake. Captain Moon was with Drake from the beginning of his eventful career, and followed his fortunes as long as he lived and he died almost at the same time as his beloved Commander. Captain Drake says that Captain Moon struck the first blow against the spaniards in the South seas, in the war that resulted in transferring the supremacy of the seas from Spain to England, and continued with Drake throughout this long naval conflict and was with Drake on his voyage around the world. This last, was the second time that the world was ever circumnavigated, Magellan's expedition being the first, though Magellan, himself, did not live to complete the expedition. Captain Moon was born about 1520 or 1525 and was killed by a spaniard in the harbor of Carthagena, in 1585. Sir Francis Drake in his autobiography devotes much space to the praise of Captain Moon. In a large volume of epic poems, by Alfred Noyes, devoted to the praise of Sir Francis Drake and his brave deeds, considerable space is devoted to singing the praise of Captain Thomas Moon, for the important part that he played in the service of England under Drake.

It was long ago remarked that but for the voyages and expeditions of Sir Francis Drake (and Captain Moon) that America would have remained unsettled, almost unknown for many years if not for ages.

The Moons in America

Captain Thomas Moon was one of the first of the family to visit America, perhaps the very first, for when he made his first visit, about the year 1570, there was no English settlement in America and it was thirty-seven years later that the first permanent English settlement was established at Jamestown. The Registry of Saint Matin's Church, of Ludgate, England, shows that William Moon, son of Thomas Moon, was christened on August 6th, 1370. This William Moon was most likely the son of Captain Thomas Moon, and was possibly the William Moon, who was one of the early emigrants to Virginia.

The Moons at Jamestown

At a meeting of the Virginia Company held on March 30th, 1631, in London, among other matters engaging the attention of the Court there came on the following: Mr. Moon's petition touching his brother Nicholas Moon's "adventure" paid into the treasury at Jamestown, "is referred to the examination of ye auditors," for his further satisfaction. Nicholas Moon, was a resident of Jamestown on March 30th, 1621. He had doubtless, been a resident of Jamestown for sometime, for he had been there long enough to be calling for an audit of the money paid into the treasury at some time in the past. It may be interesting to know that at this same meeting there came up before the Court the petition of Captain John Smith, showing "That for so much, that he not only advanced money, for the good of the plantation, as he hath alleged, but that for he discovered the country, and relieved the Colony willingly three years with that which he got from the Savages, with great peril and hazard of his life; that therefore, in consideration hereof, the Company would please to reward him either out of the Treasury here or out of the profits of the generality in Virginia. Touching which request "the Court hath referred him to the Committee appointed for rewarding of men of merit." (From the record of Virginia Company Vol. I, p 474.)

At the same meeting of the Virginia Company, (held on March 30th, 1621) there came up for consideration the petition of Mr. Henry Rolfe, in behalf of his brother, John Rolfe, of Jamestown, and the petition was referred to the Auditors and Committee to be examined, who "are desired to make report what they shall think fit to be done therein." (From the record of the Virginia Company, Vol. I, p. 474.)

At a meeting of the Virginia Company held in England on November 14th, 1621, among other matters engaging the attention of the Court appears the following:

"Mr. Churchill Moon, of the Middlesex Temple in London, Gentleman, having eight shares of land in Virginia allowed by the Auditors, did upon request pass them over, with approbation of the Court, in manner following: He assigned four of them unto Mr. Charles Cratford, of the Middle Temple, London, unto Mr. Charles Cratford, of the Middle Temple, London, Esq.; also he a signed two to Mr. Richard Chettle, and two unto Mr. William Wheat, of the Middle Temple, Esq."

From the above we would infer that Mr. Churchill Moon, had been a resident of Jamestown prior to this time and had returned to England, and was selling his lands in Virginia, that he had acquired while in Jamestown. The Moons, then were among the very first settlers of Jamestown.

Captain John Moon came over from England, in the ship Katherine of London, in the year 1623 and joined the colonists at Jamestown. He was born at Berry, near Gasport, in the Parish of Stoak, in Hampton, England. He soon became active in the affairs of the colony. The Virginia Company, granted fifty acres of land for each emigrant, that any one brought over. John Moon received, soon after his arrival in Virginia, two hundred acres of land, in Isle of Wight County, near Jamestown, for himself and three emigrants that he brought over with him in the Katherine of London. At a later date he received nine hundred acres, for eighteen other emigrants he had brought over from England. This grant was dated August 20th, l635. This land was also in the Isle of Wight County, adjoining his other lands. On October 10th, 1637, he was granted 550 acres more in the same county for eleven other emigrants he had brought over. At another time be was granted 2,250 acres for forty-five emigrants that he brought from England. We have therefore found a record of seventy-eight emigrants that Captain Moon brought over to Virginia, and he had been granted 3,900 acres of land, for this service to the colony. It is entirely probable that the above number of emigrants brought over by Captain Moon, are only a small percentage of the emigrants brought over by him, for doubtless there were many more of which we have not been able to find any record. Captain Moon was captain of a ship plying between England and Virginia from the year 1606 to 1619, engaged in the colonizing and exploring business. Captain John Moon was married twice. We do not know the name of his first wife. He had by her three daughters. If there were any sons there is no record of them and in his will, he makes no provision for them. His last wife was, before her marriage to him, a Mrs. Wilson. He did not bring over his wife and daughter until he had been in America a few years. Captain Moon had no childred by his last wife.

Captain Moon and the Jamestown Colony

At a Court held at Elizabeth City, Virginia, on February 10th, 1628, Present: Captain West, Governor, etc., Doctor Pott, Captain Smith, Captain Matthews and Mr. Clayborne. A controversy between Mrs. Rostell Pallantine and Mr. John Moon, came into question. Mr. Moon upon his oath stated that the whole crop of tobacco that his whole servants and Mrs. Pallantine's attended that year came to 10,652 lbs. Mr. Thomas Burgess testified that he never gave any power or consent to Mr. Moon for the removing and replanting of the servants of Mrs. Pallantine. At this term of the Court Mr. Moon agreed to give and Mrs. Pallantine agreed to accept 3200 pounds tobacco for her servants for the year, and that she shall have half of the crop of corn, and Mr. Moon to make it up to 29 Bbls., if it is wanting in that quantity. It was further agreed that Mrs. Pallantine shall have the dwelling house, where she now lives, and the tobacco house, which standeth by the same, and half the ground which is cleared; and further Mrs. Pallantine is to grant Mr. Moon a lease on the other half of the ground, and the house thereon for three years, and he shall have the right to clear as much land as he and his servants shall need, and Mrs. Pallantine, in lieu of the said tobacco house is to pay Mr. Moon 1,000 pounds of tobacco.

At another meeting of the Court held at James City (Jamestown) on March 7th, 1628, present: John Pott, Esq., Governor, etc., Capt. Smith, Capt. Matthews, and Mr. Claybourne and Mr. Flarrar. "It is thought fit that Captain Matthews bring up John Moon, of Warresquioak, at the next meeting to answer to certain contemning words which he hath spoken against the Commander of that plantation."

Captain Moon was a member of the Virginia House of Burgess for the years 1639 and 1640, and also for the years 1654 and 1655. He died in the year 1655. His Will was probated on August 12th, 1655. He left a vast estate of lands and other property in Virginia; also lands at Berry and Alvanstoak, England. Among other property was a Brew house in Jamestown.

Captain Moon provided in his Will that certain cattle and the increase therefrom were to remain forever and the profits therefrom to be used for a free school for poor and fatherless children, that hath nothing left to bring them up, and for old people that are past their labor, and for lame people, in this lower Parish of the Isle of Wight County, Virginia. From this provision of Captain Moon's Will, was established what become known as Moon's Free School, and was the first free school established in America. (The full text of Capt. Moon's Will may be found in Virginia Magazine, Vol. VI, p. 33-37; also William & Mary College Quarterly, Vol. VII, p. 222:

The activity of Captain John Moon in bringing emigrants to America resulted in the coming to Virginia, and other American Colonies, from England, of a very large number of Moons, a few of whose names are listed herein. Before we leave Captain Moon it may not be out of place to suggest that very likely Captain John Moon was a son of Captain Thomas Moon, the companion of Sir Frances Drake. He was about the right age to have been the son of Thomas, and since both were in the same occupation, Captains of vessels plying between England and America, it is not at all unlikely that they were father and son.

Captain John Smith in his History of Virginia, published in 1626, in giving a list of the very early arrivals at Jamestown, includes the following names: Nicholas Moon, Captain John Moon, Edward Brooks, John Brooks, John Brooke, Richard Brooks, Francis Baldwin, Christopher Farmer, George Farmer and Captain Richard Linley. (Lindley?)

It may add to our interest in the persons named above if we will remember that nearly all of the Southern branch of the Moon family descended lineally from the Farmers, Brooks, and Baldwin families; also the Ohio branch of the Moon family descended from the Farmer family, while some of the Georgia Moons also descended from the Lindley family. This will be fully treated in another section of this book.

Some Early Emigrants from England to Virginia

Nicholas Moon and Churchill Moon came to Jamestown in 1607 or soon thereafter;

William Moon settled in New Norfolk County, in 1637; Abraham settled in the same county in the year 1638; Henry Moon came over and settled in, Ghent County, in 1637; another Abraham Moon came over and settled in Lancestaer County, in 1639. He lived here until his death in 1655. He had an only daughter, Judith, who married Sir Absolum Danby, Lord of the Treasury of England. He was one of England's most distinguished citizens, and there is quite an interesting record of the distinguished descendants of this family in Virginia Magazine, Vol. XX, pages 93-94; in the year 1638 another Abraham Moon came over and settled in North Umberland County, and later on brought over a widow, Mrs. Ann Curtis, whom he married. A Lancaster Court, in 1654 granted to Abraham lands for bringing over his wife, Ann. They had an only daughter, Elisabeth, who married John Hazlewood, Merchant,. who resided in Middlesex, London, and in 1683 was living in White Chapel Parish, London. Elizabeth was living in her house in Chambers street, London in 1692. Although the records show that lands were granted to this last named Abraham for bringing over his wife in the year 1654, these lands must have been granted to his estate, for the Colonial records show that Abraham died prior to January 1653 for on the 10th day of January in that year Mr. Broadhurst obtained a judgment vs. John Curtis, Administrator of the Estate of Abraham Moon in the sum of 530 pounds of tobacco, the same to be paid by November l5th, next. In the year 1639 John Moon came over and settled in York County, in 1652 Arthur came over and settled in North Umberland County, and in the same year Thomas settled in Scarborough County. There resided in Westmoreland County, Virginia, 1707, a John Moon whose wife prior to her marriage to him was the widow of Edmund Wyatt.

In a deed dated, December 12th, 1655, Abraham Moon, of Lancaster, for the consideration of 16,000 pounds of tobacco, granted to Thomas Hawks, his dwelling house, plantation and farm, servants, reserving for himself and wife, house room and one servant.

(Note. For much interesting data in reference to the descendants of Abraham Moon, see Virginia Magazine, Vol. 5, page 252. Also the names of a number of pioneer Moons in William & Mary College Quarterly, Vol. 17, page 67; see also Woods History of Albermarle County, Va., page 267 and Virginia Magazine, Vol. 20, page 293.)

MOON FAMILY HISTORY

The Moons in Pennsylvania

About the middle of the seventeenth century, George Fox and others raised an insurrection against the predominant church of England, The established church was supported by taxation collected by Government. Fox and his associates believed, this to be wrong, and vigorously opposed it, and soon had quite a large following. They called themselves Quakers. They addressed people as Thee and Thou, and did not use the word "you," because they declared that this word indicated that the person addressed was superior to the person talking. They believed that all people were equal; and that ministers of the gospel should preach without pay. Finally the English Government made it a crime to preach or to adhere to this doctrine, and many of the Quakers were cast into prison.

WILLIAM PENN

William Penn, son of Sir Admiral William Penn, was born in the year 1644 and was educated chiefly at Christ's Church, Oxford, where he became a Quaker when a very young man, and for his activity he was expelled from the university; later he became a lawyer and about the year 1665 he became a preacher. He was imprisoned many times. On the death of his father in 1670 he inherited an estate of 1500 pounds annually and claims against the English Government for 16,000 pounds. In 1671 he was again imprisoned for six months and on regaining his freedom, together with Fox and Barclay visited Holland. and Germany for the advancement of the Quaker interests. During the next several years he was often in prison, but finally in the year 1681 he secured from the crown in lieu of the debt of 16,000 pounds a grant of the territory which now comprises the State of Pennsylvania. By a Royal charter he was made Lord proprietor of Pennsylvania. His great desire was to establish a colony here where they might preach and practice their convictions in unmolested peace. In the same year he sent out a Governor to take possession of the province and in the year 1682, he together with several friends sailed for the Delaware, to establish a colony.

Many of the Moons of England had espoused the Quaker: cause, and among those who came over with William Penn, in 1682, were several Moons from Devon County, England. They came with Penn on the ship "Welcome," on this, his first visit to America. .Among these Moons were two brothers, John. and Jasper, and they together with the other Moons formed the Moon Colony in what became Bucks County, Pennsylvania, the county being named for Buckinghamshire, England.

John and Jasper Moon doubtless had many close relatives. in Virginia. Many of those already named as early Virginia emigrants were related to these two brothers, and most: likely they would have preferred to have joined their kinsmen in Virginia to settling in a wholly undeveloped country like Pennsylvania, but the Colony of Virginia had enacted some very stringent laws against the Quakers. To preach the Quaker doctrine or adhere to the Quaker religion was a crime. Even to harbor a Quaker was a crime and punishable by imprisonment.

As early as 1658 William Robinson, a London merchant and Quaker preacher, was imprisoned at Jamestown for six months for preaching the Quaker doctrine. Later, in 1662, this same William Robinson and William Leddern were hung in Boston. for preaching the Quaker religion, to the everlasting disgrace of the Puritans. (From Virginia Carolum, page 285.) These harsh and cruel laws forced religious refugees from England to seek another haven than Virginia.

William Penn returned to England in the year 1684, leaving behind a prosperous colony of 7,000 persons. He had quite an influence with King James II, on account of the friendship that had existed between the King and Penn's father. This influence enabled him in the year 1686, to secure from the King a proclamation by which all persons in prison on account of their religious opinions were released, and twelve hundred Quakers were set free.

This act of the King had its effect in the colonies, and resulted in the House of Burgess, of Virginia, two years later passing what was known as the "Act of Tolerance," which put an end to legal persecution of the Quakers in Virginia. Jasper Moon soon took advantage of this and left his brother John in Pennsylvania, while he joined his relatives in the "Old Dominion." John remained in Pennsylvania, where he reared a family. The old original land grant to the old Moon homestead, in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, was issued by William Penn, himself, in 1682, and was issued to John and Jasper Moon, jointly. Charles Moon, son of James, and a lineal descendant of John, the emigrant, has in his possession at the present time, the original grant. James, the father of Charles died in 1858, his widow, Jane, a woman of great learning and culture, was Secretary of the Society of Friends at their annual meetings at Philadelphia for many years.

From the Pennsylvania Colony the family is traced to Redstone, Western Pennsylvania and Western New York. The descendants of Jasper Moon are traced to Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Ohio, Missouri, Alabama and several other States. Thousands of his descendants are living to-day in these States.

THE DESCENDANTS OF JASPER MOON

After several years residence in Pennsylvania, Bucks County, Jasper Moon moved to Virginia and from best information, available, settled in Lunenburg County. He had one son Simon born about 1690. Simon was married twice and by his last wife had an only son John, who was born about the year 1715. His mother died when he was young, and he was bound out as an apprentice to the carpenters trade, and at the expiration of his apprenticeship, probably about the year 1735 or 1736, married Mary Farmer and emigrated to North Carolina and settled in Randolph County where he lived until his death at a very old age. It is probable that his father, Simon, also emigrated to North Carolina, for there was a Simon Moon living in Salsbury District in 1790. If this was the father of John, he was then about one hundred years old. Many of the Moons of those days and later lived to be almost or quite a hundred years old.

Before proceeding further with the record of John and Mary (Farmer) Moon, we deem it proper to give a brief sketch of the Farmer family. Mary Farmer we believe was born in Lunenburg County, Virginia, for we find that long before the Revolutionary War that there were Moons and Farmers in Lunenburg County. We find that there were several marriages between the Moons and Farmers of this county at an early date, and since the Moons of this county came from Pennsylvania, Mary Farmer is believed to be a descendant of Jasper Farmer of Pennsylvania, for we learn that he was the progenitor of a large family of Farmers of that State. There was a Christopher Farmer and a George Farmer at Jamestown when it was first established, but we think it almost certain that Mary Farmer descended from Jasper Farmer.

The Surname of Farmer is one of considerable antiquity and is one of the names derived from the occupations of the person. As early as the reign of King Edward the IV, the Farmers were seated in Northamptonshire, where some of them remain to the present time. They resided in Easton-Neston about 1480, where Anne, daughter of Richard Farmer, married William Lucy of Charlecourt, before the year 1545, and it was their son who was Knighted by Queen Anne, and who was the Knight and Magistrate whose name is associated with some of the early events of Shakespeare. William Farmer was created Lord Leinster in 1682 and was the ancestor of the present Earl of Pomfret. He resided at Easton-Nelson, and is said to be the ancestor of Jasper Farmer. Mary Farmer of Northhampton, England, married Hon. Richard Byron, brother or Lord (William) Byron.

There are many Farmers scattered throughout the eastern and southern parts of the United States. They are noted as an honest, honorable, industrious, and prosperous people. Many pages could be written of the Farmer family, but space forbids.

The following is a description of the Farmer Coat of Arms: "He beareth. Sable, Chevron between three Lamps. Argent, with Fire. Proper by the name of Farmer." The Farmers were of Saxon origin.

To John and Mary (Farmer) Moon were born the following children: Rachael, John, Joseph, James and Lawrence. John, Sr., was living in Randolph County, N. C., in 1790.

Rachael, daughter of John and Mary (Farmer) Moon, born about 1736, married Marmaduke Bookout of Randolph County, North Carolina, where they resided until their deaths. They were living there in 1790. We do not know the names of their children, but Charles Bookout, a grandson, went to Columbia County, Georgia, and settled and married Sandal Moon. We will see more of them in another part of this book.

John Moon, son of John and Mary (Farmer) Moon, emigrated to Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1770 and became one of a Quaker Colony of that county. James and Lawrence, also came to Columbia County, Georgia, at an early date.

John Moon was the progenitor of the Moon family of Georgia, while his brother, Joseph, was the progenitor of the Moon family of Clinton County, Ohio. We will tell more of them later.

Baldwins

We have now traced the Moon family to John Moon, the progenitor of the family in Georgia, and who married a daughter of David Baldwin. Before tracing the descendants of John Moon, we will trace the Baldwin family down to the wife of John Moon.

Captain David Baldwin, the father-in-law of John Moon, was a descendant of the pioneer Baldwins of Massachusetts Bay, and was a son of William and Sarah (Owen) Baldwin. He was a Quaker and joined the Columbia County, Georgia, Quaker Colony about the year 1770. About this time a large number of Quakers from North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania came to Wrightsboro, Ga., and established this colony. About this time there came here several immigrants from Massachusetts and Connecticut.

In 1637, several Baldwins from Devon County, England, came to America and settled on Massachusetts Bay. Two years later three Baldwin brothers, (a fourth died on shipboard during the voyage) from Devon County, England, came to America and settled at Milford on Long Island Sound, some ten miles south of New Haven. Doubtless the Baldwins of Milford and Massachusetts Bay were of the Same English stock, and as proof of this the given name of Loommi often appeared among both the Connecticut and the Massachusetts Baldwins, and then, too, they came from the same county in England.

One of the three brothers that came over, Nathaniel soon removed to Fairfield, where he married and had a son, Samuel, born in 1655. Samuel became a blacksmith and removed to Guilford, thirty miles northeast of Fairfield, in 1675. To Samuel, the Smith, there was born in 1691, a son, Timothy. To Timothy, was born, in 1716, a son, Michael. Michael was a man of character and worth, and in December 1749, he married Lucy Dudley. To them were born among other children, Abraham Baldwin, on November 2nd, 1754. Abraham Baldwin graduated from Yale (A.B. Degree) in 1772.

Abraham Baldwin came to Georgia, in the latter part of 1783 or the early part of 1784, and located at Augusta, Ga. He was a member from Georgia to the Convention which framed and adopted the Constitution of the United States. He played a very important part in shaping that instrument; wrote several of its articles and it is said that he cast the deciding vote on the adoption of the Constitution. He was the first United States Senator from Georgia, and founded the University of Georgia. He died in 1807 and was buried at Rock church five miles from Washington, D. C. He was never married.

David Baldwin was a Captain in the Revolutionary War, and had two sons, William and David, Jr., who were also soldiers in this war. Sometime during the war, Francis Baldwin and Mordacai Baldwin, from Massachusetts came to Georgia and were soldiers in Captain David Baldwins Company, of Minute Men. Undoubtedly these men were close kin to Captain Baldwin. It is not at all unlikely, that David Baldwin was responsible for the coming of Abraham Baldwin to Augusta, and locating in the same county, with Captain David Baldwin (it was then St. Paul's Parish. In 1790, the Parish was divided making Columbia and Richmond Counties). These facts we think indicate that David descended from the Massachusetts Baldwins, and that he was closely related to Abraham Baldwin. Therefore, the wife of John Moon, was collaterally related to Abraham Baldwin.

The following is a list of Baldwins who served in the Revolutionary army from Columbia County, Georgia, and for which service each one received a grant of land in Washington County, Georgia: Abraham Baldwin, Chaplain; David Baldwin, Sr., Captain of a Company of Minute Men; Mordacai Baldwin, Lieutenant, of Minute Men; William Baldwin, Sergeant; David Baldwin, Jr., Private; Francis Baldwin, Private.

David Baldwin, Sr., and his son, William, were both in the second siege of Augusta, and both died from fever contracted during this siege.

SOME BALDWINS OF PROMINENCE OF ENGLAND AND AMERICA

A Baldwin was Physician to King Edward, the Conqueror, about the year 1098.

Loommi Baldwin (1744-1807) of Weburn Mass., was friend and adviser of long standing to Benjamin Thompson (Count Mumford) and incidentally was the originator of the Baldwin apple. His son, Loommi, was chief construction engineer of the old Middlesex Canal, and a tablet erected to his memory in Weyburn styles him: "The Father of Civil Engineering in America."

Roger Sherman Baldwin, brother of Abraham Baldwin, was twice Governor of Connecticut, and also served two terms as United States Senator from Connecticut.

Right Honorable Stanley Baldwin, Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury of England since 1923.

Joseph Mason Baldwin, M. A., Dr. Sc., Government Astronomer for Victoria since 1920.

Hon. Simon Eben Baldwin, M. A. (Yale) L. L.D., Harvard, Columbia, Wesleyan and Yale. Prof. of Law at Yale since 1872. Governor of Connecticut 1911-1915.

Rev. Edward Carston Baldwin, Vicar of Harston. Proprietor Standard Newspaper, Famous Minister and Author.

Walter Burton Baldwin, Late Captain Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.

Guy Melforth Baldwin, Brig. General, Surgeon General to His Majesty, the King of England since 1923.

Sir Harry Kt. Baldwin, Surgeon Dentist to His Majesty, the King of England, since 1918.

James Mark Baldwin, M. A., Ph. D., Princeton, Author of many books and awarded many honorary degrees by Colleges and Universities over the world.

John Eustice Arthur Baldwin, Wing Commander of the Royal Air Forces of England. John Grey Baldwin, Lt. of the English Army.

The Baldwins of Europe

The name Baldwin comes from the old German or Scandinavian, and means the conqueror or victor. The name appears in records as early as 872. In that year a Baldwin, of Flanders married the daughter of Alfred the Great. One of the first names to appear in history is Baldwin, Son of Gau, a young French knight killed in the Battle of Roueen Valles in 778. Baldwins of the Iron Arm was founder of the burgess, 937. His descendants ruled the Dukedom of Flanders, and his wife was Judith, daughter of King Charles, the Bald, of France. Matilda, daughter of the Duke of Flanders, married William the Conqueror. The name appears in the roll of Battle Abbey. After the conquest they became Earls of Devonshire. The family is traced through Earls of Flanders to Godfrey de Bouillon, leader of the only successful crusade that was ever made against Jerusalem. On this occasion Count Baldwin of Flanders was crowned as King of Jerusalem under the title of Baldwin, the First, King of Jerusalem. This was in the year 1100. Jerusalem was ruled by the Baldwin Dynasty for 86 years. During one of the many wars with the Mohammedans, history says that the Genoese aided King Baldwin and as a reward he gave them the ashes of John the Baptist. In the year 1200 Count Baldwin the IX of Flanders, after a victorious crusade against Constantinople, was crowned as Baldwin the First, Emperor of Constantinople. He reigned until his death in the year 1218. His nephew succeeded him and reigned until the year 1268.

We see from the above that after the conquest the Baldwins settled in Devonshire, or County Devon. It was from there that they came to Massachusetts and Connecticut, in 1637-39 and it was from these Baldwins that Captain David Baldwin, the father of the wife of John Moon, descended.

The Moons in Georgia

At a meeting of the President and Assistants (The Board of Management) for the Colony of Georgia, held on Friday, October 23rd, 1747, present, William Stephens, President; Henry Parker, William Spencer, Samuel Mercer and Patrick Graham, Assistants, the Board gave favorable consideration to the petition of Alexander Moon, for about five hundred acres of land, sufficient for himself and about thirty slaves, at Darien, Ga. The Board directed that he obtain a certificate from Major Horten and John McIntosh of Darien, for the lands, as the lands were in their possession, and the Board deferred the granting of a warrant to the Surveyor to run out said lands until such certificate was produced. For some reason there was a change in the plans of Moon, and he did not secure the lands above referred to, and we find that on March 1st, 1748, Alexander Moon and his slaves were located at Frederica (St. Simonds Island) Ga. About this time we find from the Colonial records of Georgia, that Alexander Moon's creditors from the Colony of South Carolina, petitioned the Georgia Colony to permit them to foreclose a mortgage against the slaves of Moon and to return them to South Carolina. This is the last that we hear of Alexander Moon in Georgia. Most likely he returned to South Carolina with his slaves. Alexander was the first Moon to locate in Georgia, of whom we have any record. The Georgia Colony was then about fifteen years old: Alexander Moon was one of the first, perhaps the very first Englishman to locate on St. Simonds Island. He was certainly not a descendant of Jasper Moon, though he most probably came from the Moon Family in England.

The Quaker Colony in Columbia County, Georgia

About the year 1770, a Colony of Quakers, numbering about one hundred families, located at Wrightsborough, Columbia County, Georgia. They were mostly from North Carolina, though several of them were originally from New England. Among the immigrants we find Captain David Baldwin and John Moon, son of John and Mary (Farmer) Moon. These immigrants were a very high class of people, and proved to be a valuable addition to the Georgia Colony, They were people of more than ordinary intelligence; several were graduates of Yale College. They soon became leaders in the affairs of the Colony, and from then to the present time, they and their posterity have been leaders in Georgia and the South in all of the worthwhile affairs of life.

In 1774, these colonists held a meeting and passed resolutions protesting against the action of the "Boston Tea Party." In these resolutions they condemned the people who engaged in throwing overboard the tea. They were afraid that these acts would involve the colonies in war with the mother country. These resolutions were signed by all of the members of the Colony, including John Moon and Captain Baldwin. The passing of these resolutions are not surprising when we remember that opposition to war is a part of the Quaker religion. However, when the war came, every one of these colonists were loyal to the Colonies.

John Moon, the Progenitor of the Moon Family in Georgia

John Moon, son of John and Mary Farmer Moon, and brother of Joseph Moon, the progenitor of the Moons of Clinton County, Ohio, was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, about the year 1737. He married Miss ---- Baldwin, daughter of Captain David Baldwin an officer in the Revolutionary War. John was a private soldier in the Revolutionary War and was granted 287 1/2 acres of land in Washington County, Georgia, on account of his military service. He had a son named Thomas. John and his family, together with his brother, James, and it is believed, his brother, Lawrence, also, and also his father-in-law, David Baldwin and his family, moved to Columbia County, Georgia, and joined the Quaker Colony at Wrightsborough, about the year 1770. He was one of the Quakers who signed the paper protesting against the action of the Boston Tea Party in 1774. John Moon was executor of the Will of David Baldwin, and as such secured for Baldwin's estate a grant of 535 acres of land in Washington County, Georgia, on account of military service of Captain Baldwin in the Revolutionary War. He died in 1830, aged 93 years.

Thomas Moon, son of John Moon, the progenitor of the Georgia branch of the family, was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, in the year 1759, and removed with his father to Columbia County, Georgia, when he was 10 years old. When he was a young man he and his father often visited their kinfolks in Albermarle and other counties in Virginia. They were recognized as the social equals of the most prominent men of the nation, as is evidenced by the following quotation from Virginia Magazines, Vol. 6, pages 171 to 173. "John Coles kept open house at Enniscorthy, and there was rarely a time when they were without guests, among those who would come, not for a day, but for weeks were, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Patrick Henry, Wort, Edmond, John, and Thomas Moon, Randolph, Tazewell and a number of other prominent men." This John Coles was a first cousin of Patrick Henry. (It was from this family of Coles that Harriet Coles Moon descended. More will be said of the Coles family in another part of this book.)

Thomas Moon married Miss Sarah Brooks. To them were born twelve children: Jesse, Edom, Louis, James, Raleigh, Thomas, Joseph, Lizzie or (Elizabeth), Amy and Polly. We do not know the names of the other two children. Thomas was a prosperous farmer. He owned a large plantation in Columbia County, and many slaves. He died in 1855, at the age of 96 years.

Amy, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon and sister of Jesse and Joseph Moon, was born in Columbia County Georgia, and married Buck Richardson. Unto them were born the following children: Rollie, Billie, James, Grover, Malachi, Edom, Thomas and Joseph. Billie moved to Alabama and was said to have had fifteen children. Mary married Madison Moon, son of Jesse Moon, her first cousin. She lived to be eighty or ninety years old.

Lewis, son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1778 and married Miss Martha Willingham of Columbia County, Georgia, in 1806. Unto to them were born the following children: Javus, John, Marmon B. (Most likely the "B." in his name stood for "Bookout" and was doubtless named for Marmon Bookout of North Carolina, who married Rachael Moon). Marmon B. Moon married Elizabeth Austin, and to them were born the following children: Lewis, Martha, John, Margaret, Jesse, Morgan and Bev. Bev lives in Texas. Isaac, Mary and one that died in infancy.

Lewis Moon served two terms in the lower house of the General Assembly of Georgia and one term in the Georgia Senate, when the Capitol was at Milledgeville.

Mary Ann, daughter of Lewis and Martha Willingham Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia. October 6th, 1839, and married John. B. Rodgers, April 8th, 1855. There were born unto them seven children: Lewis J., William R. Martha M., Elizabeth S., John E., James R., and Isaac I.. Since the death of Mr. Rodgers his widow, has been living with her son, James R., a successful merchant of Tucker, Ga.

Thomas, son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia, County, Georgia. We know nothing of him or his family, except that he had, perhaps among others, the following named children: Jabez, James, Lewis, Levi, Bookout and Charlie.

Edom, son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1784. He had twelve children, among whom were the following, Daniel, William Edom Jr., Mary, Sarah, Martha and Patsy (Patty). Cannot give the names of his other children. He moved to Walker County, Georgia, about 1840.

Patsy (Called Patty), daughter of Edom Moon, Sr., and grand-daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born March 16th, 1818, and married Josiah Brooks. She had several children among whom was Jane ( ), who married Josh Still on October 15th, 1866, and to them were born six children: Jennie, Mattie, Sallie, Samp, Joe and Lum.

Edom, Jr., son of Edom, Sr., was born in Walton County, Georgia, in the year 1830 and moved with his father to Walker County, Georgia, when about ten years of age, and where he was still living in 1920 at the age of 90 years.

Jabez, son of Thomas Moon and grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1833 and was married to Miss Isabel Clark. Unto them were born nine children: Thomas E., born March 19th, 1854, and was married three times: 1st to Miss Eliza Wingate; 2nd, Miss Lizzie Pool: 3rd, to Miss Elizabeth Jones. He had seven children. William I., was born May 15th, 1857, and married Feller Edwards and has seven children. James B., was born July 3rd, 1858, and married miss Callie Pool and had eight children. Robert M., born October, 1862, and married Miss Amanda Knight and had seven children: Anna, born in 1864, married Frank Perry and had five children. Albert A., born in 1866, married Miss Rosa Sigman and had three children. Ida was born in June, 1872, and married Hugh Dorsey, and had eight children. Battie E., born June 13, 1874, married Miss Pinkie Gray and had seven children. Battie has served on the Atlanta Police Force for more than twenty years.

Elizabeth (Moon) Shipp

Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about the end of the 18th Century. She married John Shipp and about 1836 they settled near Powder Springs, in Cobb County, Georgia, near the line of Paulding County. To them were born the following children: John, Jesse, Richard, William, Rolly, Lizzie, Emily, and others whose names we do not know.

John Shipp, son of John and Elizabeth (Moon) Shipp, married 1st, Miss Bullard and had one child, Margaret, who married Jesse Bookout of Powder Springs. 2nd, a Miss Ragsdale and to them were born several children among whom were Wheeler, George and Sanders.

William Shipp married a Meadows. Do not know the names of their children, except that they had a son named William.

Richard Shipp married Miss Susan Duke and to them were born the following children: Joseph, John, Charles, Perry, Henry, Amy, Susan and Sarah.

Rolly Shipp married Miss Mary Catheart. They had one son, Homer D.

Jesse Moon

Jesse, son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, in the year 1780, and was married three times. The first time to Miss Rachael Willingham, daughter of William Willingham, of Columbia County, Georgia, and to them were born the following children: Thomas, who married a Miss Davis; John Willingham; Rachael, who married Jack Griffin; Polly, who married Burton Baggett. After the death of his first wife he married Miss Creacy Willingham, a sister of his first wife, and to them were born the following children: Madison, Louis, Cash, Nelope, Sandal, (Also called Sally) Patsy (Called Patty) and Elizabeth, who married Augustus Clay. All of the above named children were born in Columbia County, Georgia. After the death of his second wife he married Polly Brown, about the year 1846. After marrying his last wife he moved to near Roanoke, Randolph County, Alabama, where he bought a very fine farm. He had several children by his last wife but we do not know their names. Jesse Moon started out in life a poor man, and by thrift and industry accumulated quite a large fortune for his day. He was a farmer and owned some four or five thousand acres of fine land in Walton County, Georgia, and some seventy-five slaves. His farm lay north of Sharon Baptist Church. He donated three acres of land for this church when it was organized, just after the split up of the Gum Creek Church in 1845. He made a serious mistake in marrying his last wife. She caused him to sell his lands in Walton County, and move to Alabama. She secured the title to all of his lands and slaves and then drove him away in his old age. He died at the home of his brother, Joseph Moon, in Walton County, in the year 1873, at the age of 93 years.

We have seen that the two first wives of Jesse Moon were Willinghams. They were the daughters of William Willingham of Columbia County, Georgia. The Pioneer Baptist Church in Georgia was incorporated, on December 23rd, 1789, under the name of the "Anabaptist Church" and was located on Riokee Creek, Columbia County, Georgia, with the following trustees: WILLIAM WILLINGHAM, Abraham Marshall, Edmond Cartledge, John Landers, James Summers, Joseph Ray and Lewis Gardner. The first church was actually organized, though 17 years earlier, that is in 1772, but was not incorporated until this time. William Willingham was a member from the first. Abraham Marshall was the first minister.

John Willingham Moon

John Willingham Moon, the oldest son of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, on April 14th, 1802, and married Miss Harriet Coles in 1820. Harriet Coles Moon was related to the Coles family of Enniscorthy, Albermarle County, and of Hanover County, Virginia.

John Willingham and Harriet Coles Moon resided in Columbia County, Georgia, until 1824 when they moved to Walton County, and in 1837 moved to Cobb County, near Powder Springs, where he remained until his death on May 27th, 1876. He owned a large farm and prior to the Civil War owned several slaves. He was a devout member of the Primitive Baptist Church, and for many years was secretary of the Marietta Primitive Baptist Association. He had seven sons and two sons-in-.law in the Confederate Army, none of whom were killed or wounded, however, two of his sons, W. W. L., and Stephen C., died from sickness while in the army.

Harriet (Coles) Moon

Before proceeding further with the record of John Willingham Moon, we will give a brief record of his wife, Harriet (Coles) Moon. She was born in Columbia County, Georgia, in 1792 and died in Cobb County, Georgia, in 1843. She was a daughter of Marcus Coles, and Marcus Coles was a son or grandson of Col. William Coles of Coles Hill, Hanover County, Virginia. Col. William Coles was an officer in the Revolutionary War. His wife was Lucy Winston, daughter of. Col. Isaac Winston, of Hanover County. Isaac Winston was a son of Anthony and Mary (Dabney) Winston, and Anthony Winston was a son of William Winston, who came to Virginia and patented land in 1687, and continued to patent lands at different times until 1706. The land register shows that a grant of nearly seven thousand acres was issued to him. The first was issued October 21st, 1687, and the last in 1706, all in Hanover County. A grant of 1079 acres was issued to Anthony Winston in New Kent County, on October 24th, 1701. In 1734 Isaac Winston deeded a piece of land of several hundred acres, which he inherited from his father, Anthony Winston, by Will dated 1717. (Hanover County records.)

Isaac Winston was married twice, we do not know the name of his first wife, except that her given name was Sarah. His second wife was Mary Dabney. The Dabneys is one of the most distinguished families of Virginia. Isaac had two brothers, James and William, and a sister, Sarah, who married Captain John H. Henry, and was the mother of Patrick Henry, the American statesman and orator.

Isaac Winston was said to have been an orator of wonderful power. He was a member of the First Congress, and remained in Congress for several years. He was also an officer in the Revolutionary War.

The Winstons were Welch and were noted in Virginia for vivacity of spirit, conversational talent, with a lyric and dramatic turn, a gift for music and for eloquent speech, as well as for their fondness for country life. It was from his mother, Sarah (Winston) Henry that Patrick Henry inherited his gift as an orator.

The Coles Family descended from a young Englishman who went to Ireland at an early date, at a time when the English Government, in order to keep the Irish in subjugation, offered large inducements to English "Gentlemen" to emigrate there. He received large grants of lands and became the owner of several estates, chief of which was Enniscorthy, situated in Leicester County, Wexford, in the southeastern part of Ireland, where some of his descendants are to the present time.

In the year 1710 John Coles (1677-1747) a son of the owner of Enniscorthy incurred the displeasure of his father and came to Virginia and settled near where Richmond now stands, and was said to have built the first house ever erected in Richmond. He married Mary, sister of Isaac Winston and daughter of Anthony and Mary (Dabney) Winston of Hanover County, Virginia. John and Mary (Winston) Coles had five children: Col. Walter Coles, Sarah Coles, Mary Coles, John Coles and Edward Coles. John Coles, the emigrant, had not been in Virginia but a short time until he became possessed of a large fortune, and it is presumed by this that his father, in Ireland, forgave him. He owned a large tract of land in Halifax County, on the Staunton river, consisting of two plantations; he also bought a place consisting of three thousand acres in Albermarle County, from Richard and William Epps, but the deed was not admitted to record because it was proved by only two witnesses, but in 1777, Francis Epps, son of Richard Epps, and his wife, Elizabeth, made a deed to this property to John Coles, the second and it was admitted to record. This last deed was witnessed by Thomas Jefferson and George Gilmer, as Magistrates. It was on this last named tract that Mr. Coles built a famous mansion, which he called Enniscorthy, after the place in Ireland.

Colonel Walter Coles, son of John and Mary (Winston) Coles, married first Elizabeth Cocke; 2nd, Sallie Swan. Mary Coles, daughter of John, and Mary (Winston) Coles married Robert Carter; Col. Edward Coles, son of John and Mary (Winston) Coles, married Sallie Logan Roberts of Philadelphia; Col. Isaac Coles, son of John and Mary (Winston) Coles lived in Hanover County, Virginia, and represented that District in Congress for many years.

Colonel John Coles, son of John and Mary (Winston) Coles inherited Enniscorthy from his father where he resided. He was born 1745 and died in 1808. He married Mary E. Tucker, daughter of John and Elizabeth Travis Tucker. She was born in Jamestown and died in 1826. Col. John Coles was an officer in the Revolutionary War; a member of the First Congress, and continued to serve in Congress for several years. He lived at Enniscorthy, which he very much enlarged and beautified, making it one of the most famous estates in Virginia. This famous mansion stood until 1836 when it was destroyed by fire. John Coles developed the old time Virginia hospitality to a marked degree, and history says "that he kept open house, and that there was rarely a time when they were without guests; among those who would come, not for a day but for weeks at a time were Jefferson, Madison, Patrick Henry, Wirth, Edmond, John and Thomas Moon, Randolph, Tazewell, and a number of prominent men." (From Va. Magazine, Vol. 7, page 102.)

The John and Thomas Moon, named above were the great grandfather and grandfather, respectively, of John Willingham Moon, whose wife was Harriet (Coles) Moon.

To John and Mary E. (Tucker) Coles were born the following children: Walter, John, .Isaac A., Tucker, Edward, Rebecca, the wife of Richard Singleton, of South Carolina; Mary Eliza, the wife of Robert Cofer; Sarah, the wife of Andrew Stevenson; Elizabeth, who was never married and Emily, the wife of John Rutherford, who was once Governor of Virginia.

Edward Coles, son of John and Mary E. (Tucker) Coles, was private secretary to President Madison, from 1809 to 1815. He owned a large farm on Rock Fish river, which he sold and went to Illinois, carrying with him all of his slaves. Upon reaching Illinois he gave them all their freedom, and to each head of a family 160 acres of land. He was the first Governor of Illinois, and served two terms.

Sometime after John Coles, the first, came to Virginia, his younger brother, William, came over and married Lucy Winston, daughter of Isaac Winston, as we have already seen. Among other children they had two sons, Walter and Marcus, and a daughter, Mary, who was distinguished for her beauty and charm. Thomas Jefferson was one of her many admirers, and was said to have sought her hand in marriage. She married Col. John Payne and they had two daughters, Dorothy, known in history as Dollie Madison, and Lucy. Marcus Coles was the father of Harriet (Coles) Moon. Lucy Winston married, first, Wm. Dabney and after his death married Col. William Coles.

Dorothy, daughter of Col. John and Mary (Coles) Payne, was born on May 20th, 1768, near New Garden, Quaker meeting house, in Guilford County, North Carolina, with which church her parents were active adherents. Dorothy also became an active Quaker at a very early age. When she was some three years old her patents returned to Hanover County, Virginia. When about eighteen years of age Dorothy married John Todd of Virginia. She had two children. In 1792 her husband and one of the children died during an epidemic of yellow fever in Philadelphia. Prior to the Revolutionary War the Paynes were quite wealthy, but it was practically all lost during the war. At the close of the war the family moved to Philadelphia where Mrs. Payne, Dorothy's mother, ran a boarding house for several years. After the death of her husband Dorothy lived with her mother in the boarding house. Among the boarders was James Madison of Virginia. In 1794 she and Mr. Madison were married, and in 1809 he became the fourth President of the United States. Dollie Madison was the most famous hostess who has ever graced the White House. She died in 1855.

Lucy, the other daughter of John and Mary (Coles) Payne, married first, in 1792, Major George Steptoe Washington. He was a son of Samuel Washington and a nephew of General George Washington, whom he served as private secretary for several years. Major Washington only lived a few years after his marriage and after his death, his widow, Lucy, married in 1812, Judge Thomas ............ Todd, of Lexington, Ky., Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Kentucky and afterwards, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

From the Dabneys, Coles and Winston Families have descended, many of America's most distinguished men and women. It should be mentioned that former Governor John A. Winston of Alabama was a direct descendant of Isaac Winston. Many other Governors, Ambassadors, Congressmen and United States Senators have descended from these families.

We have now shown that Harriet (Coles) Moon was a first cousin of Dollie Madison and Lucy Washington-Todd and a second cousin to Patrick Henry and to John Coles of Enniscorthy, Albermarle County, Virginia, and a third cousin to Edward Coles, first Governor of Illinois. We have shown her relationship to the Coles, Winston and Dabney families. She died in 1843, when her children were young and at an age when they took but little interest in genealogical matters, but John Francis Moon, father of the writer, happened to remember that his mother told him of her relationship to Dollie Madison and to Patrick Henry, although John F. Moon was only thirteen years of age when his mother died. If any should doubt the relationship of Harriet (Coles) Moon to the families above referred to, we suggest that you notice that John Moon the progenitor of the Moon family in Georgia and his son, Thomas, the great grandfather and grandfather were often visitors at Enniscorthy, Albermarle County, Virginia, the home of Col. John Coles, the second. Also we find that Marcus Coles, the father of Harriet (Coles) Moon and son of William Coles, is a neighbor to the pioneer Moons in Georgia, in Columbia County, where John Willingham Moon and Harriet (Coles) Moon both lived at the time of their marriage in 1820.

CHILDREN OF JOHN WILLINGHAM AND HARRIET (COLES) MOON

Joseph K., born in Columbia County, December 22nd, 1820; Cicero D., born in Columbia County, Georgia, December 13th, 1822; W. L., known as "Coot," born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1824; Thomas Jefferson, born in Walton County, Georgia, July 28th, 1826; John Francis, born in Walton County, Georgia May 6th, 1830, Isaac N., born in Walton County, Georgia, April 11th, 1832; W. W. L., known as "Lump" was born in Walton County, Georgia; Sarah N. E., was born in Walton County, Georgia, October 24th, 1828; Stephen C., born in Cobb County, August 7th, 1841; Lucy Ellen was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 3rd, 1834, J. M. Lee was born in Cobb County, Georgia, in 1840 and died in 1855.

CHILDREN OF JOHN WILLINGHAM AND PRUDENCE (BAGGETT) MOON

After the death of Harriet (Coles) Moon, John Willingham Moon on November 1st, 1843, married Miss Prudence Baggett of Cobb County, Georgia, and to them were born the following children: Mary E., born March 7th, 1847, and married James R. Summers.

Mariles J., born September 30th, 1844, and married John Summers of Cobb County; Susan L., born December 15th, 1849. She married David C. Pool and died about 1920. She had no children: Rachael R., born October 3rd, 1857, and married James R. Elliott of Cobb County. Willie, daughter, was born March 6th, 1860, and married William R. House. Benjamin F., born September 11th, 1854.

Joseph K., oldest son of Harriet (Coles) and John Willingham Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, and moved with his father to Cobb County, Georgia, when about sixteen years old. He married Miss Mary Butner, daughter of Thomas Butner of Walton County, Georgia, in 1848. Upon the opening of hostilities in the Civil War he enlisted as Sergeant of Company D, 7th Ga. Reg. of Infantry. He was later promoted to Lieutenant of the Company. Before the close of the war he was transferred to Company I, of the same Regiment where he remained until the close of the war. He was a Mason and for years Secretary, and later Worshipful Master of Springville Lodge at Powder Springs, Ga. He died on July 12th, 1870. To him and Mary (Butner) Moon were born the following children: Zadoc B., who married, first, Miss Mattie Smith of Cobb County, and second, Miss Mattie Hardage of Powder Springs, Cobb County; J. Robert, Harriet M., Josephine L. S., Charles C., Maggie F.

Joseph K. Moon lost several slaves and much other property on account of the war. Prior to the war he was engaged in the mercantile business at Powder Springs; after the war he engaged in farming until his death.

Cicero D., son of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, married Miss Ferruby Bullard, of Cobb County, and to them were born eight children: H. B. T., known as Homer, who married Miss Catron Gray; Celestia, who married C. J. Estes; Susie who married A. J. Cox of Kennesaw, Ga.; Emmie, who married George S. Elliott of Hiram; Stephen D., who married, first, Miss Millie Martin, 2nd, Miss Lizzie Johnson; John N., David C. and Robert D. After the death of his first wife, Cicero D. Moon married Mrs. Susan McCutcheon, sister of his first wife. He had no children by his last wife. He, too, was a member of the Masonic Lodge at Powder Springs. He also served a short time in the Confederate Army. He died on August 27th, 1899.

THOMAS JEFFERSON MOON

Thomas Jefferson Moon, son of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on July 28th, 1826, and was married to his first cousin, Miss Elizabeth Moon, daughter of Thomas Moon, and granddaughter of Jesse Moon. To them were born five children: Thomas, Harriet, Penora, Lydia and Joe, who died when small. He was a private in Company "B" 41st Regiment Confederate Army, throughout the war. He was a farmer and resided in Cobb County, near Powder Springs, until his death in 1889.

W. L., known as "Coot," son of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia., in 1824 and died in Cobb County, in 1876. He married Miss Melissay E. Webb of Walton County, and to them were born seven children: Isaac N., who married a Miss Adams and moved to Texas; J. Lump, who also married a Miss Adams; W. W. (known as "Doub" ; Charles, Lewis, known as "Butler;" Richard, who was killed by a train when about sixteen years old and a daughter "Sister" who married John Dunton, and lives in Atlanta. W. L. Moon was a private soldier in the Confederate Army.

John Francis Moon, son of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, May 6, 1830; married Miss Sophronia Adcock of Cobb County, February 17, 1856. The marriage ceremony was performed by his brother, Cicero D. Moon, who was a Justice of the Peace. He first settled on a farm in Cobb County, but after about four years, moved to Paulding County, near the town of Hiram, where he resided and engaged in farming until his death on February 6, 1902. To them were born six children: Louis Anthony, Robert Toombs, Mary Jane, Harriet Lane, Frances Sophronia and John William. John F. Moon, enlisted and served throughout the war as a private, in Company "I" Second Georgia Cavalry, Confederate Army, except twenty-three months that he spent in prison at Camp Douglas, at Chicago. While in the Confederate Army he was one of the guards when the Anderson Raiders were executed, in the summer of 1862. He and his wife joined the Primitive Baptist Church at New Harmony Church many years before their death, and were baptised by Elder Isaac N. Moon, his brother. He was a man of fine sense, an excellent citizen and an humble Christian. (See sketch of Sophronia Adcock Moon in an other part of this book.)

Isaac N. Moon was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 11, 1832. He was married twice; the first time to Cythnia Bullard of Cobb County, Georgia, and to them were born eight children: six boys and two girls. After the death of his first wife he married Mrs. Maggie Daniel of Cobb County, Georgia. He was a physician, and practiced this profession in early life, but finally abandoned this and became a farmer and minister of the gospel, which calling he continued until his death, about 1912. He joined the Primitive Baptist Church, at Sorrells Springs Church, in 1872, and was ordained to preach at the same time that he was received into the church. He represented Cobb County in the lower house of the General Assembly of Georgia during the years 1886-87.

W. W. L. Moon, (known as Lump) son of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born in Walton County and married Miss Milza Webb. He enlisted as a private in Company "I" Second Georgia Cavalry, of the Confederate Army. On the morning of March 30th, 1863, he was found dead in Camp by his mess-mate and brother-in-law, Wm. Bullard. He was not well the evening before and it was thought that he had, through mistake, taken an overdose of morphine, which caused his death. He had no children.

His widow married William Brown of Walton County, and they had three children, Wiley, Luther and Sallie. Wiley married Minnie Black and Sallie married Cash Moon of Walton County.

Stephen C. Moon, son of John Willingham and Harriet Coles Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, on August 7, 1841, and was never married. He enlisted as a private in Company "D" Seventh Regiment, Confederate Army. He was in the battle of Manassas and had had measles and at the time was forced to wade a creek or river, which caused a relapse of measles and pneumonia, from which he died on July 30th, 1863.

Lucy Ellen, daughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon was born in Walton County, Georgia, on April 3rd, 1834. She married' William M. Bullard of Cobb County, and to them were born eight children: J. T., Robert G. Narcissa I., William M., Sarah C., Maggie, F. M., (known as Mat.) Brotherton M., Belle, who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Bullard resided on a farm near Powder Springs, Cobb County, Georgia, until they moved to Bremen, Haralson County, about 1882, where Mr. Bullard successfully engaged in the mercantile business until his death. Mrs. Bullard died about the year 1913. . Her husband's death preceded hers by several years.

Sarah N. E. Moon, daughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, and granddaughter of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on October 24th, 1828, and came with her father to Cobb County in 1836 or 1837. About the year 1849 she married Jacob D. Moore, of Cobb County, and to them were born nine children: John D., Ellen, Harriet, Barney, Jacob Z., Autry C., Perry G., Lizzie and Mattie. Mrs. Moore died August 22nd, 1910. Her husband died several years previous to this.

J. M. Lee, son of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born in 1840, in Cobb County, and died in 1855.

DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH K. MOON

Zadoc B. Moon, son of Joseph K. and Mary Butner Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, in 1850 and died in 1916. He was married, first, to Miss Mattie Smith of Cobb County, and to them were born the following children: Walter, Emmett F. and James P. After the death of his first wife he married Miss Mattie Hardage, of Powder Springs, Ga. He was well educated and wrote a beautiful hand. He taught school for a few years in his young manhood, but quit this and served for a long time as Captain of Police, in Atlanta, which position he resigned before his death. He was possessed of a wonderful intellect, and made Atlanta a brave and efficient officer.

J. Robert, son of Joseph K. and Mary Butner Moon (1853-1898), was born in Cobb County, Georgia. At the age of 21 he commenced an apprenticeship as carpenter and builder, and in 1879 moved to Dallas, Ga., where he followed his trade, until 1885 when he was elected Deputy Sheriff, which office he filled for four years and was then elected Sheriff of Paulding County. In 1893 he was appointed postmaster at Dallas. He was for years W. M. of Dallas Masonic Lodge, and was an active number of the Baptist Church. He was married twice, 1st, to Miss Eliza Smith and to them was born one child, Ella; 2nd, to Miss Sarah J. Hagan, daughter of Henry N. and Elizabeth Stewart Hagan, and to them were born five children: Jessie M., who died in infancy; Bessie L., who married G A. Spinks; Clara L., who married P. A. Partee of Atlanta; Robert Rolland, who died when about 20 years of age, and Lloyd, who married and lives in Atlanta.

Charles C., son of Joseph K. and Mary Butner Moon, (1858-1909), was born in Cobb County, Georgia. He married Miss Georgia Knox, of Paulding County, and settled on a farm near Hiram where he remained until his death. He was an active and prominent Mason, and filled both the office of Secretary and Worshipful Master of the Masonic Lodge at Hiram for several years. He was a successful farmer and had many friends. He had six children: J. Knox, Grover C., Charles C., Frank, Bertha and Louise. His widow and all the children now live in Atlanta.

DESCENDANTS OF CHARLES C. AND GEORGIA (KNOX) MOON

J. Knox, son of Charles C. and Georgia (Knox) Moon, and grandson of Joseph K., and Mary Butner Moon, was born near Hiram, Ga., and married Miss Vassie Clonts. To them were born the following children: Joseph and Florence. Joseph was born about 1909 and Florence about the year 1915. They live in Atlanta. Mrs. Vassie Moon, died in 1928.

Grover C., son of Charles C. and Georgia Knox Moon, was born near Hiram, Ga., and married Miss Nellie Clonts. They have three children. They live in Atlanta.

Bertha, daughter of Charles C. and Georgia (Knox) Moon, was born near Hiram, Ga., and married R. C. Clonts, a successful business man, who holds an excellent position with Austin Brothers Bridge Co. of Atlanta. They have only one child, Robert, who was born about 1908.

Charles C., Jr., son of Charles C., Sr., and Georgia (Knox) Moon, was born near Hiram, Ga., and married Miss Hettie Lee. She died about 1924 leaving three small girl children, including baby twins. Mr. Moon has an excellent position as a traveling salesman with some rubber company.

Frank and Louise, the two youngest children of Charles C. and Georgia (Knox) Moon, are unmarried and live with their mother in Atlanta.

HARRIET M. (MOON) SORRELLS

Harriet M., daughter of Joseph K. and Mary Butner Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1852, and married James M. Sorrells, son of Russell Beasly and Rosanna Lindley Sorrells. To them were born the following children: Joseph, Charles, Benjamin, Russell, Bethel, Thomas, Ludie, Mary, Rosa, Nettie and Lena. Mr. Sorrells and his family moved to near Rockmart many years ago, and settled on a farm, where he still resides. Harriet M. Sorrells died in 1914.

DESCENDANTS OF HARRIET (MOON) SORRELLS AND JAMES M. SORRELLS

1st., Charles Robert, son of James T. and Harriet (Moon) Sorrells, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born September 22nd, 1872, married Miss Ferguson and lives in Polk County, Georgia; Joseph Knox, born March 30th, 1874, married Belle Hawkings of Blair, Oklahoma, where they still reside. They have eight sons; 3. Russell Beasley, born January 1st, 1876, married Miss Ruth Williams of Polk County, Georgia. He is a passenger conductor on the Southern Railway, and lives in Atlanta. They have three children: Russell, who will graduate in 1930 from the Georgia School of Technology, with the degree of Civil Engineering; Winfield and Mary. 4. William Bethel, born July 1st, 1877, married Miss Jane Camp and has eight children. They live at Rockmart, Ga. 5. Rosanna ................., born June 18th, 1881, married Arthur C. Helme. They live at Rockmart and have no children. 6. Tallulah Jane, born April 12th, 1879, married C. M. Strange. She died in January, 1924, leaving six children. 7. John Bennet, born June 12th, 1883, and died in 1909. He was never married. 8. Mary C., born in 1885, married Cicero Kinney. They live at Rockmart, and have no children. 9. Thomas W., born in 1888, and died in 1913. He was never married. 10. Harriet, born in 1894, married Wesley A. Godwin. They have nine children, and live in Polk County, Georgia. 11. Nettie, born November 1, 1896. She married Lonnie Campbell. They live at Rockmart and have two children.

Maggie, daughter of Joseph K. and Mary Butler Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1866, and married J. F. Welch, a successful merchant of Dallas, Ga., in the year 1894 or '95. To them were born the following children: Robert, Frank, Wendall and Myrtis. Robert died from influenza and pneumonia about 1918 or 1919. Frank married Miss Ruth Underwood; Wendall married Ruby Denton. Myrtis married Eugene Bullock, a prominent and successful merchant of Dallas, Ga., They have twin daughters and one or two other children.

Josephine L. S., daughter of Joseph K. and Mary Butner Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1858, and was married to Dock Johns of Cobb County, Georgia. Soon after their marriage, they moved to a farm near Cohutta, Ga., where they lived until her death, several years ago. They had several children, but we do not know their names, except Dessa who married Sam Wilson of Cohutta, Ga. They have two children.

DESCENDANTS OF JACOB D. AND SARAH N. E. (MOON) MOORE

Ellen, daughter of Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and married: 1st, William Yates. He did not live very long. After several years of widowhood she married Mr. M. W. Porter of near Hiram, Ga., who died in 1927. She has no children.

Harriet, daughter of Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore and granddaughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Cole) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and married John M. Sorrells, son of Russell Beasley Sorrells. They had five children: Linda, Elmer, Clarence, Dudley and Sallie.

Linda, daughter of John M. and Harriet Sorrels, married Thomas G. Elliott, son of G. S. and Emmie (Moon) Elliott. They have one son, George, born about 1908. They had two other children that died in infancy.

Elmer, son of John M. and Harriet Sorrells, married Leola Locke of Montezuma, Ga. They had four children whose names we do not know. He died in December, 1923.

Dudley, son of John M. and Harriet Sorrells, married Miss Annie Estes. To them were born the following children: Nita, who married Pink Wheeler (son of Ed. A. and Emma Gray Wheeler). Lorene, married an Aiken; Marshall, and two other boys.

Clarence, son of John M. and Harriet Sorrells, married, 1st, Miss Lula Cawley. They had no children. After her death, he married Mrs. Emma Tucker, daughter of John D. Moore. They had one child, Harold. Clarence died in March, 1925.

Sallie, daughter of John M. and Harriet Sorrells, married Tasker W. Rakestraw, and to them were born the following children: Barney, Nannie Evelyn; Frank, Essie, Blanche and another son.

Lizzie (Moore) Landrum

Lizzie, daughter of Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore and granddaughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was married to J. Lump Landrum of Powder Springs, Ga. To them were born the following children: Zollie, Hattie, Murray, Mary, now deceased; Lenda, Gwendolyn, Tenon and Cinda.

Mattie (Moore) Ward

Mattie, daughter of Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore, and granddaughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and married A. J. Ward of Cobb County. To them were born the following children: Otis, died in January, 1902, aged about twenty-one years; Myrtis, who married Leon Brooks, and died about 1912; Kate, who married 1st, a Mr. Debardelaben. After his death she married, 2nd, Homer McClesky; Nell; married Guy Kemp, son of Dr. W. M. Kemp of Marietta. Mrs. Ward died about the year 1911.

Barney, son of Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was married to Miss Mollie Scoggins, and they had a daughter, Clifford. Mr. Moore and his wife, both died when Clifford was small.

Jacob Z., son of Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was married to Miss Latissia Austin. They had several children. We only know the name of one, a daughter, Kate. He died several years ago. His widow and children live in Chatanooga, Tenn.

Autrey C., son of. Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1867, and was married, 1st, to Miss Olivia Bullard, daughter of Lydia (Moon) Bullard, and to them were born the following children: Clyde, A. C., Jr., Olivia and Raymond. Mrs. Olivia Moore died in May, 1906, and Mr. Moore married, 2nd. Miss Annie Petree of Cobb County. To them were born the following children: Leone, Jeff, Lula and Keith.

A. C. Moore, Jr., graduated from the 7th District, A. & M. School at Powder Springs, and in 1929 graduated from the University of Georgia, A. B. Degree.

Perry G., son of Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about 1870; and married Miss Laura Umphrey, daughter of Allen Umphrey of Paulding County, Georgia, about the year 1893. Not many years after his marriage Mr. Moore moved to Alabama, where he and his family now live. They have several children, but we cannot furnish their names.

John D. Moore

John D., son of Jacob D. and Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1850, and married, 1st, Miss Emma Rakestraw, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Baggett) Rakestraw. (Elizabeth Baggett Rakestraw was a daughter of Polly (Moon) Baggett, whose record see.) To them were born the following children: Shaley and Gertrude, who died in infancy; J. Tasker, who married Miss Maggie Bookout, daughter of Jesse and Margaret (Ship) Bookout; Maud, who married W. O. Elliott, son of Emmie (Moon) and G. S. Elliott. They have one son, Marvin. They live in Miami, Florida. Zee, who married Theodore Martin. They have one son, Dudley, and live in Atlanta. Mr. Moore also had a daughter, Allie, born about 1887 and died about 1906. Also a daughter, Emma, who married, first, Elmer Tucker, and 2nd, Clarence Sorrells, son of Harriet (Moore) Sorrells.

After the death of his first wife Mr. Moore married Miss Jennie Sewell, and to them was born one child, Thomas W., who went to Syracuse, N. Y., before reaching his majority and nothing was ever heard from him. After the death of his second wife, Mr. Moore married Miss Mattie Johns, who died in 1923 and Mr. Moore died in 1925. They had no children.

DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC N. AND CYTHNIA (BULLARD) MOON

To Isaac N. and Cythnia (Bullard) Moon were born the following children: Isaac C., known as "Bud"; Joseph B., Robert, Monk, John E., Marcus N., generally known as "Bart"; Lou and Cythnia Victoria.

Isaac C., son of Isaac N., and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, married Miss Mary Martin and to them were born the following children: Carelton, Estelle and Herman. Carleton married a Miss Humphrey, and only lived a few years after his marriage. He. had two daughters, who live with their mother in Atlanta; Herman was born at Powder Springs, Ga., and married Miss Hattie Bullock, daughter of Robert Bullock of Dallas, Ga. Herman has been in the employment of the Southern Railway at Austell, Ga., for several years as telegraph operator. Isaac C. died about the year 1915.

Joseph B., son of Isaac N. and Cythnia (Bullard) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1861. He married Miss Mary Rollins of Cobb County, and to them were born the following children: Luther, who married a Miss Spinks of Cobb County; Mabel, who married Mr. D. Goss Thomas on January 25th, 1904; Lizzie and Stephen C. Joseph B. Moon was a very fine musician; wrote many sacred songs and was a successful music teacher. He died in 1889, aged 28 years.

To Mabel, daughter of Joseph B. and Mary (Rollins) Moon, and her husband, D. Goss Thomas, were born four children: 1. Joseph Fred, who married Miss Louise Gary, on September 13th, 1923, and they have three children: Joseph Fred, Jr., Evelyn Virginia and Goss; 2. Emma Leila; 3. Julia; 4. Helen Mabel. The Thomas' live in Atlanta.

Lizzie, daughter of Joseph B. and Mary (Rollins) Moon, married Arthur C. Garmon. They have one son, Harold O. They live in East Point, Ga.

Stephen C., son of Joseph B. and Mary (Rollins) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga. He married Miss John Chestia Titshaw of Hoschton, Ga., on September 15th, 1917. They live at Gainesville, Ga., where Mr. Moon is successfully engaged in the real estate business. They have no children.

Lou, daughter of Isaac N. and Cythnia (Bullard) Moon, and granddaughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, married Elder William T. Walden, a prominent Primitive Baptist Minister. To them were born three children: Homer, who died when about sixteen years of age; Ollie, who married Silas McMichen, and Isaac, who married Miss Annie Scott. Isaac died when about twenty-five years old, leaving his widow and two children, Glenn and Viola. Glenn married Mrs. Lizzie Hardy Bullard, who was a daughter of Harriet (Moon) Hardy. Harriet Moon Hardy was a daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Elizabeth Moon. Glenn Walden was killed by a train at a grade crossing at Powder Springs, Ga., in 1928. Viola, sister to Glenn, and daughter of Isaac Walden, married a Mr. Still. They reside at Powder Springs, Ga.

Robert, son of Isaac N. and Cythnia (Bullard) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and married Miss Lizzie McGregor. To them were born the following children: Herschell, who married Miss Allie Denton; Bessie, who married a Mr. Clay; Addie who married Charles M. Head of Cobb County and Roy R., who married a lady in Atlanta, but do not know her maiden name. Robert died when a young man.

Monk, son of Isaac N. and Cythnia (Bullard) Moon, was born in Cobb County, near Powder Springs, Ga., and married Miss Ida Blackwell. Monk, too, died when he was a young man, leaving a widow and two little boys: Grady and another whose name we do not know. They live near Roswell, Ga.

John E. Moon, son of Isaac N. Moon, was never married. He was a physician and lived at Hiram, where he practiced his profession for about two years, when he died. He was an excellent physician and would have made a success could he have lived.

Marcus N., son of Isaac N. and Cythnia (Bullard) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1871, and married Miss Lou Bone, of Paulding County, Georgia. To them were born the following children: Beatrice, who married Lawton Johnson of Dallas, Ga. They have one son, Ray; Nellie, who married Mr. Bridges. They have two children. Horace Richard, who married Miss Summers, daughter of H. D. Summers. Marcus, who married a Miss Hardy, and Oliver, who was killed in an automobile accident in 1925, when he was about twenty years of age. He was never married.

Cythnia Victoria, daughter of Isaac N. and Cythnia (Bullard) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., on January 16th, 1867, and was married to Silas Casey Holland on December 6th, 1888. To them were born three children: Lydia Cythnia, Hattie Gertrude and Mary Victoria. Hattie Gertrude married James E. Estes and they had one child, Herbert Durell, born April 13, 1911. Mary Victoria was married to Shirley Adams on May 17th, 1912. Cythnia Victoria Holland died on May 4th, 1896.

DESCENDANTS OF W. M. AND LUCY ELLEN (MOON) BULLARD

J. T., son of Lucy Ellen (Moon) and W. M. Bullard, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., on November 5th, 1858, and married Miss Sarah J. Fuller. They had no children. He died about 1915.

Robert G., son of Lucy Ellen (Moon) and W. M. Bullard, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., June 15th, 1860, and married Miss Elva Ada Ward on January 15th, 1882. To them were born the following children: R. G., Jr., born October 11th, 1882, and died in infancy; Iola B., born April 11th, 1886, and married R. E. Bently, February 20th, 1910; Berilieu A., born February 25th, 1888; R.M., born April 3rd, 1896, and Robbie Neil, born November 16th, 1902.

Sarah C., daughter of Lucy Ellen and W.M. Bullard, and granddaughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born November 10th, 1867, and married J. P. Powell. They live in Alabama.

H. I. V., daughter of Lucy Ellen (Moon) and W. M. Bullard, and granddaughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and married W. B. Petree. They too, went to Alabama.

Wm. M., son of' Lucy Ellen (Moon) and W. M. Bullard, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., April 3rd, 1866, and married Miss Arrie Howington. We have not the names of their children. They live near Baxley, Ga.

F. M., son of Lucy Ellen (Moon) and W. M. Bullard, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., on May 16th, 1875, and married Miss Lessie Bullard, daughter of James Bullard, and a first cousin. We have not the names of their children. They live near Baxley, Ga.

Jesse Mae Hettie, daughter of Lucy Ellen and W. M. Bullard, died in infancy; also Belle, born February 27th, 1880, died in infancy.

B. M., son of Lucy Ellen (Moon) and W. M. Bullard, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., on September 17th, 1877, and married Miss Martha M. Wyatt. To them were born two children: Brotherton, Jr., and Martha. Both of whom are unmarried. Mr. Bullard is engaged in the real estate business in Atlanta and is making a success. He. was a candidate for Comptroller-General of Georgia in 1928, against William A. Wright, and ran a wonderful race, everything considered, but failed to be elected.

Maggie, daughter of W. M. and Lucy Ellen (Moon) Bullard, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and was married to John Holding, a merchant, of Bremen, Ga., about the year 1903. Mr. Holding was a successful merchant for several years. He died in the spring of 1929, and his widow resides at Bremen. They had two children: John Billie, born about 1907, and George Washington, born about 1909. John Billie graduated from the 7th Dist., A. & M. School, at Powder Springs, Ga.; later he attended Mercer University at Macon and later graduated from Emory University. He is a chemist and is employed in the Department of Chemistry of the State of Georgia.

Narcissa V. (Bullard) Paris

Narcissa L., daughter of W. M. and Ellen (Moon) Bullard, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., on November 17th, 1861. She was a granddaughter of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon. She married N. V. Paris on November 13th, 1881. To them were born the following children: Rufus E., born August 31st, 1882: Leola C., born April 23rd, 1884; Lehman H., born March 29th, 1886; Lucy J., born June 15th, 1887 and died about the year 1920. Myrtie M., born April 24th, 1889; Nellie V., born May 8th, 1893; Stellie M., born October 20th, 1894; Quincy J., born August 10th, 1896; Ruby E., born September 11th, 1898; Nora H., born November 10th, 1900; Grace J., born June 4th, 1902, and Willie W., born November 20th, 1905.

Rufus E. Paris, son of N. V: and Narcissa L. Paris, was married to Miss Amanda Kirk on June 4th, 1902. To them were born two children: R. Edward, born September 25th, 1902, and died December 28th, 1911; Mary E., born September 1st, 1905, and died April 3rd, 1906.

After the death of his first wife, Rufus E. Paris married Miss Georgia Jarmon on March 15th, 1909. To them were born two children: Randolph, born April 25th, 1910, died June 19th, 1912; Bertha L. born June lst, 1912.

After the death of his second wife, Mr. Paris married Miss ............ McClung, and to them were born several children.

Leola, daughter of N. V. and Narcissa L. Paris, was married to W. G. Wood. on April 21st, 1911. To them was born one child, Rufus E., Jr. on March 29th, 1912.

Herbert R., son of N. V. and Narcissa L. Paris, was married to Miss. Mattie Howell on December 25th, 1909. To them was born a daughter, Florine on July 15th, 1911.

Lucy A., daughter of N. V. and Narcissa L. Paris, was married to Emmett Paris on December 25, 1910. Emmett was born in June 1889.

Myrtie, daughter of N. V. and Narcissa L. Paris, was married to Charles J. Fanin on June 21st, 1908. To them were born two children; Etta Mae on December 29th, 1909, and Irene L. on October 14th, 1911.

DESCENDANTS OF CICERO D. MOON

H. B. T. (known as Tuck), son of Cicero D. and Ferruby Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, about 1855, and married Miss Catron Gray of Paulding County, Georgia. To them were born the following children: Arthur M., who married Miss Pearl Campbell of Ben Hill, Ga.; Eunice, who married Robert Willingham. They live in Paulding County and have several children; Bessie, who married John Petree; Clarence, who married Mattie Turner, and to them was born one child. Clarence died when about twenty-five years of age; Weyman, who married Miss Ruth Archer and resides in Atlanta; Herbert, and Annie. Annie graduated from Brenau College, Gainesville, Ga. (A. B. Degree.) She married Rex Josie, Andrews, S. C. They have a daughter, Beverly Ann, born October, 1928.

Arthur H. Moon, son of H. B. T. and Catron Gray Moon, was born in Cobb County, about the year 1880. He attended the country schools, and later the University of Georgia, where he graduated, (A. B. Degree) about 1906. After graduation he engaged in teaching. He taught for several years at Baxley, Ga., and later became Superintendent of Schools at Tifton where he remained for several years and until his death, about the year 1923. He was appointed a member of the State Board of Education by Hon. Hoke Smith during his first term as Governor of Georgia, which position he held until his death. He was regarded as one of the very ablest educators in Georgia. He was a great student, and spent his summer vacations in the University of Chicago, where he received his M. A. Degree about the year 1920. Immediately after getting his M. A, Degree he began to study for his Ph.D. Degree, and was almost ready for this degree when he died from overwork. He married Miss Pearl Campbell who survives, him. They had no children.

Emmie (Moon) Elliott

Emmie, daughter of Cicero D. and Ferruby (Bullard) Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, about the year 1852, and married George S. Elliott To them were born the following children: Oliver C., William O., who married Miss Maude Moore, daughter of John D. Moore, and granddaughter of Sarah N. E. (Moon) and Jacob D. Moore. (See record under name of Moore.) Thomas G., who married Miss Linda Sorrells, daughter of John and Harriet (Moore) Sorrells. She too was a granddaughter of Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore and Jacob D. Moore. (Further record of her will be found under name of Sorrells). Loulella, who married Floyd G. Lester; Jossie, who married Luther Chandler; Kate, who married Lucius Hooks; Georgia, who married John H. Lester, Emmie, Mattie, Etta Mae and Garon. Garon married Thomas F. Mitchell of Hiram, Ga. Geronie, who married Noah Warren, one of the faculty of the Georgia School of Technology; and Arah, who is unmarried. Mrs. Elliott died in 1928.

Susie, daughter of Cicero D. and Ferruby (Bullard) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1860 and married Mr. A. J. Cox of Kennesaw, Ga., and to them were born the following children: 1st, Jerome, who married Miss Jennie Carrie of Cobb County, Georgia. They have one daughter, Genevieve; 2nd, Cicero, who married Miss Fite of Cartersville, Ga., 3rd, Robert, who married Miss Wiggins; 4th, Nellie, who married Frank Kenney. They reside in Little Rock, Ark.; 5th, Elaine, who married Edwin Dyer; 6th, Pauline; 7th, Nellie and 8th, Grace.

David C., son of Cicero D. and Ferruby (Bullard) Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, about the year 1867 and married Miss Lula Petree. He has three children: Minnie, who married Dr. R. L. Lester, her third cousin; Ruth, who married Frank G. Lester, her third cousin, and David C., Jr., who is unmarried.

Celestia, daughter of Cicero D. and Ferruby (Bullard) Moon, married Cicero Estes of Hiram, Ga. They only had one child which died in infancy. Mrs. Estes died about the year 1904.

Robert D., son of Cicero D. and Ferruby (Bullard) Moon, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born about the year 1870, and died of heart failure on June 2nd, 1926. He married, first, Miss Lola Reeves, and to them was born one child, Frank. After the death of his first wife he married Miss Cora Daniels, daughter of Robert Daniels of Cobb County, and to them were born two sons: Robert Daniel, Jr., and John Willingham, who is called "Jack."

Frank, son of Robert D. and Lola (Reeves) Moon, and grandson of Cicero D. and Ferruby (Bullard) Moon, married Miss Bonnie B. Bullard, daughter of W. Perry Bullard (W. Perry Bullard is a son of Lydia (Moon) and Gip Bullard.) They have one son, Frank, Jr.

Stephen D., son of Cicero D. and Ferruby Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, about the year 1866, and married, 1st, Miss Millie Martin, and to them were born the following children: Dr. Samuel C., a successful and prominent druggist of Athens, Ga.. Dr. Moon married Miss Jimmie McCowan, daughter of John and Eliza Sorrells McCowan of Cobb County. Mrs. Jimmie Moon was a granddaughter of Russell Beasley Sorrells. Stephen D. and Millie had the following daughters: Gertrude, Myrtle and Nona. Stephen D., married 2nd, Miss Lizzie John-son, and to them was born a son, Glenn, who is married and lives in Atlanta. Mr. Moon is a prosperous farmer and resides near Powder Springs, Ga.

John N., son of Cicero and Ferruby (Bullard) Moon, was born about the year 1864, and married Miss Sallie Goggins of Paulding County, Georgia. To them were born two children: Everett W., who married a Miss Griffin, daughter of John Griffin of Dallas, Ga. They had several children. They resided in Atlanta, where he had a prosperous floral business. He was also an employee of the Georgia Power Company. He was killed in an electric car collision, which occurred on the Marietta-Atlanta car line, in the early part of 1928.

Sallie, daughter of John N. and Sallie G. Moon, married Mr. Calvin C. Rakestraw of Paulding County. They have three children and live near Hiram, where Mr. Rakestraw is engaged in farming.

Sophronia Adcock Moon

Sophronia Adcock Moon (1829-1903) was the wife of John Francis Moon, and before giving the family record of their children, we will give the family record of Sophronia Adcock Moon.

She was born in Gwinnett County, Georgia, on August 26th, 1829, and died June 3rd, 1903. Her father was William Adcock his father was Simpson Adcock. Simpson Adcock's father was Thomas Adcock, a soldier of the Revolutionary War. After the war closed Thomas Adcock received a land bounty of 287 1/2 acres in Washington County, Georgia, in recognition of his service as a soldier. There were some three or four other Adcocks in the Revolutionary War from Georgia, each of whom received a grant of lands in Washington County.

Thomas Adcock, the soldier, married the daughter of William Simpson, who was a man of great prominence in the affairs of Georgia during the Colonial days. He was Chief Justice of Georgia for a time and held other official positions.

Sophronia (Adcock) Moon's mother was, prior to her marriage Miss Polly Griffith, daughter of David Griffith, who came to Georgia when quite young from Maryland. His wife was, prior to her marriage a Fletcher, and her mother was a Ralston, a sister of the mother of Salmon P. Chase, the American Statesman and the first Governor of Ohio. David Griffith was a soldier in the War of 1812. He drew a pension for many years. He was born about the year 1765 and died about the year 1872, being aged about 107 years. He joined the Baptist Church at Poplar Springs, Paulding County, Georgia, and was baptized after he was 100 years old.

William Adcock, the father of Sophronia (Adcock) Moon, came from Gwinnett County and settled near Powder Springs, Cobb County, about the year 1837. To him and his wile, Polly (Griffith) Adcock, were born fifteen children: Wilson, Lev, David, Noah; Augustus, Samuel, Jeptha, Joseph, Thomas, Marion, Sarah, Sophronia, Mary, Jane and Theodocia.

DESCENDANTS OF JOHN F. AND SOPHRONIA (ADCOCK) MOON

Louis Anthony, son of John F. and Sophronia (Adcock) Moon, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, on December 12th, 1856. On December 8th, 1881, he married Miss Sarah (Sallie) T. Hipps, daughter of Andrew J. Hipps of Paulding County. For several years after his marriage he was successfully engaged in the mercantile business at Powder Springs, Ga. In the year 1902 he moved to Hiram, Ga., where he formed a partnership business with his brother-in-law, Mr. W. W. Hunt, and under the firm name of Moon & Hunt conducted a successful mercantile business until his death on September 15th, 1918. His wife's death preceded his by only a few days. They had no children.

Robert Toombs, son of John F. and Sophronia (Adcock) Moon, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, on June 8th, 1858. On November 29th, 1883, he married Miss C. Ella Land. daughter of Mr. J. H. Land, of Cobb County, Georgia. To them were born two children: Robert Cecil, born November 10th, 1900, and died July 6th, 1901, and Ina Ophelia, born June 17th, 1903. In 1882 Mr. Moon engaged in the mercantile business at Hiram, Ga., and conducted a prosperous business until he retired about the year 1896, since which time he has given his attention to his agricultural interests.

Mary Jane, daughter of John F. and Sophronia (Adcock) Moon, was born in Cobb County, Georgia, (in October 19th, 1859. On December 6th, 1893, she married John A. Clonts, of Paulding County. To them were born three children: A son that died in infancy; Jack G., and Samuel G. Her husband died in December 1899. She died in Atlanta, Ga., on May 26th, 1928.

Frances Sophronia, daughter of John F., and Sophronia (Adcock) Moon, was born in Paulding County, Georgia, October 27th, 1862, and was married to John T. Lester of the same county; in February, 1887. To them were born the following children: Bernard, born January 31st, 1889, and died March 28th, 1892; Robert Lee, born September 3rd, 1891; Ross W., born November 19th, 1893; Elon, born June 24th, 1896; Thelma, born August 7th, 1898; J. Frank, born May 20th, 1901, and Wallace born January 24th, 1904.

Robert Lee, son of Frances Sophronia (Moon) and John T. Lester, was a soldier in the World War, and was wounded by a German shell; he was also gassed. He married Minnie Moon, daughter of David C. Moon. (David C. Moon was a grandson of John Willingham Moon.) Robert L. Lester and his wife were third cousins. He resides at Marietta, Ga., where he is engaged in business as an optometrist.

Ross W. Lester, son of Frances S. and John T. Lester, was also a soldier in the World War, and saw active service in France and guard duty, on the Rhine, for sometime after the end of the war. Ross has had for many years an excellent position with the Goodrich Rubber Company of Akron, Ohio. After returning from the World War he married Miss Marian Cranz of Akron. They have a daughter, Francis, born April 28th, 1923, and a son, John Thomas, born June 13th, 1929.

J. Frank Lester, son of Frances S. and John T. Lester, married Ruth Moon, (sister to Minnie, who married Dr. Robert L. Lester). They live at Winter Haven, Florida, where he has a position in the post office. He is also a pharmacist, and works certain hours each day as druggist.

Wallace is unmarried. He has been employed for several years in the post office at Chicago, Ill. He graduated in a School of Optometry, at Chicago.

Harriet Lane, (known as Hattie) daughter of John F. and Sophronia (Adcock) Moon, has never married.

John William Moon

John William Moon, (known as Jack) author of this book, son of John F. and Sophronia (Adcock) Moon and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born at Hiram, Paulding County, Georgia, August 12th, 1866. He was reared on the farm and attended the country schools. He taught school during the year that he became 20 years of age; he then attended Moores Business University, of Atlanta, graduating in March, 1887. In September of 1887 he became book-keeper and salesman for his brother, Robert T. Moon, a merchant of Hiram, Ga., where he remained for seven years. During this time he studied law, mostly at night, and after a perfect examination was admitted to the bar at Dallas, Ga., on August 11, 1892. He engaged in the practice of law at Hiram and at Dallas, for a few years, but as he was very badly near sighted he gave up the practice of law and returned to Hiram where he engaged in the mercantile business in the year 1904. Here he conducted a successful business until his health failed in 1925, when he moved with his family to Atlanta, Ga.

On December 28th, 1904, he married Miss Eunice Sorrells, daughter of William Bennett and Mattie (Rakestraw) Sorrells. Before proceeding further with the record of John William Moon we will trace the record of Eunice (Sorrells) Moon. She was born in Cobb County, on June 19, 1885. Russell Beasley Sorrells (1814-1907) her grandfather, was a son of Charles Sorrells of Morgan County, Georgia. Charles Sorrells moved with his family to Walton County, Georgia, when Russell Beasley was a small boy, and Russell Beasley Sorrells moved to Cobb County, about the year 1837.

Charles Sorrells' father, and the grandfather of Russell Beasley Sorrells, was Benjamin Sorrells, a private soldier under Captain Elisha Rhodes, in First N. C. Regiment of Infantry commanded by Col. Samuel Jarvis, in the Revolutionary War. His pay began on June 1st, 1780, and he was wounded in the Battle of the Cowpens on January 17th, 1781. There were two other Sorrells soldiers in the Revolutionary War from North Carolina: Thomas Sorrells, who enlisted in Captain Blount's Company on July 2nd, 1778, and died September 16th, 1778, (more than two years before the Battle of the Cowpens) and Lewis Sorrells, who enlisted in Captain Carter's Company, on February 12th, 1781, (a month, after the Battle of the Cowpens.) All of the Sorrells of Georgia understand that they descended from this Revolutionary soldier who was wounded in the Battle of the Cowpens.

Eunice (Sorrells) Moon's paternal grandmother was Rosanna Lindley, daughter of James Lindley. James Lindley was a native of Walton County, Georgia, and moved to Cobb County about the year, 1837. He was a son of Jonathan Lindley; his mother was Nancy Blair, daughter of Johnson Blair, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and who was granted by the State of Georgia 287 1/2 acres of land in Washington County as a bonus for his service. Johnson Blair settled on this land and died about the year 1812. Rosanna (Lindley) Sorrells was born in 1817 and died in 1906.

Captain Richard Lindley was a citizen of Jamestown prior to 1620. There was a Thomas Lindley of Virginia, who married Lucinda Barker, daughter of William Barker, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War from Virginia. It is probable that Rosanna (Lindley) Sorrells, grandmother of Eunice (Sorrells) Moon, descended from these Lindleys. There was, also a James Lindley, in Virginia, who served as Corporal in the Revolutionary War.

Eunice (Sorrells) Moon's mother was Miss Mattie Rakestraw, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Baggett) Rakestraw. Elizabeth (Baggett) Rakestraw was a daughter of Burton and Polly (Moon) Baggett. Polly (Moon) Baggett was a daughter of Jesse Moon and a half sister of John Willingham Moon, who was the grandfather of John William Moon, the husband of Eunice (Sorrells) Moon.

Children of John William and Eunice (Sorrells) Moon: Christine Sophronia, born October 31st, 1904, Lorraine Sorrells, born February 10th, 1908; Mildred Virginia, born April 19th, 1911; Jack Bennett, born January 15th, 1917, and an infant son, born and died August 23, 1920.

Christine, the oldest daughter, graduated from the Seventh District A. & M. School, at Powder Springs, after which she attended Bessie Tift College for one year; she then attended the University of Georgia, where she graduated (A. B. Degree) in 1925, at the age of 19. She taught at Piedmont College after graduation and at the present time (1929) is one of the Faculty of the Mississippi Woman's College, Hattiesburg, Miss. Christine has done considerable work on her M. A. Degree at Emory University.

DESCENDANTS OF W. L. AND MELISSA (WEBB) MOON

Isaac Newton, son of Melissa (Webb) and W. L. Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1852, and married Miss Lou Adams of Cobb County. To them was born a large family of children among who were Fayette and Louella. They moved to Texas about 1898.

J. Lump, son of W. L. and Melissa (Webb) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1854 and married Miss Emma Adams. To them were born the following children; Lon, Mary, Lee, Susie, Rolly and several others whose names we do not know. Mr. Moon moved to Alabama about the year 1894, where he resided until his death.

Narcissa, daughter of W. L. and Melissa (Webb) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga. She married John C. Dunton, and to them were born five sons and four daughters: C. L., Frank and Raymond, of Atlanta; R. C., of Columbia, S. C., and H. C., of Detroit, Mich. We do not know the names of her daughters, but one of them married J. C. Cotton, another married W. B. McMillan; another married H. C. McGee and the other married William Schoeder of Detroit, Mich. Mr. Dunton died in March, 1930. His widow lives in Atlanta.

Charles, son of W. L. and Melissa (Webb) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and married a Miss Baswell. They have no children.

Lewis, (known as Butler) son of W. L. and Melissa (Webb) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga. He married in Atlanta, and had one son, whose name we do not know, and who was working in the Atlanta Post Office, the last that we heard of him. Lewis lives in Atlanta.

Richard, the youngest son of W. L. and Melissa (Webb) Moon, was run over and killed by a train when about sixteen years old.

Wyly W., son of W. L. and Melissa (Webb) Moon, married Miss Eula Baswell and to them were born the following children: 1st, Uma, who married C. W. Jenkins; 2nd, Dannah, born 1892. married Miss Bessie Irwin in 1914, and have one child, Loree; 3rd, Fred H., who married Miss Susie Mae Price,; 4th, Wyly G., who married Annie Mae Jenkins; 5th, John B., who married Miss Giblonski; Vernon T., Singer D., Viola, Claudie B., Opal and Loring. All of the children and the widow of Wyly W. live in Atlanta. Wyly W. was killed by a street car accident in 1921. Opal, son of Wyly W., was killed by a fall from an auto-truck, March 11th, 1930.

DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON AND ELIZABETH MOON

Thomas, son of Thomas Jefferson and Elizabeth Moon, and grandson of John Willingham and Harriet (Coles) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1850. He married Miss Julia Hardy, and moved to Boaz, Alabama, when a young man, where he lived until his death about the year 1900. They had the following children: John T., who died when about 22 years old; Bessie, who married and died when about 25 years old, she left no children; Andrew, who died when small; Thomas, who died about 1880; James, who married and has one child, Harvey D., who married Miss Annie Smith, and Hettie, who married D. D. Broadwell. Harvey D. and Hettie live near Boaz, Alabama.

Harriet, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Elizabeth Moon, was born near Powder Springs, and married Dean M. Hardy about the year 1877. To them were born the following children: 1st, Andrew D., born about 1878 and married 1st, in 1902, to Miss Jessie Wilson, who died in May, 1905, leaving two children; Rufus F. and Hettie Elizabeth. In November, 1905, he married second, Miss Della McDonald, and to them were born the following children: Willie and Dean, twins; James, Glenn, Herman W. and Grady. 2nd, Mamie, who married R. S. Pilgrim and died when young; 3rd, Thomas J., who married Ethel Bullard, daughter of W. D. Bullard; (W. D. Bullard was a son of Gip and Lydia Ann (Moon) Bullard) 4th, J. Lumus, who married a Miss Goins, and has two children, Georgia and Bettie; Lizzie, who married Orin Bullard, son of W. D. Bullard, who was killed in an automobile accident in 1918; she married in 1920 Glenn Walden, grandson of Elder W. T. and Lou (Moon) Walden, and he was killed, also, in an automobile accident in 1928; she had one or two children, by her last husband. 5th, Sarah R., who married T. L. Echols. They have six children and live near Hiram, Ga., and 6th, a son, Senate, who is unmarried.

Lydia, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Elizabeth Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and married Joseph Camp. They have several children, among whom is a daughter, who married Chester Hardy.

Penora, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Elizabeth Moon, was born near Powder Springs, and married Raleigh Adams. To them were born several children whose names we do not know.

DESCENDANTS OF JAMES R. AND MARY ELIZABETH (MOON) SUMMERS

H. David Summers, son of James R. and Mary E. (Moon) Summers and grandson of John Willingham and Prudence (Baggett) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., and married Miss Jessie Ella Sheffield, in 1891. To them were born the following children: Dean I., who married Miss Carrie Porter; Corbett, who married in 1929, Miss Hattie Compton of Powder Springs, Ga. She was great granddaughter of Burton and Polly (Moon) Baggett; Myrtle, who married Willie Camp, son of Joseph and Lydia (Moon) Camp; Nettie, who married Chester Morris; Mary Mae, who married Horace Richard Moon, son of Marcus N. Moon, John C., Jessie Lee, Ben Frank, Willard and H. D., Jr.

J. Robert, son of James R. and Mary E. (Moon) Summers, married Bertha House, Daughter of Willie (Moon) House. To them were born the following children: James, Maudie and Minnie Lee.

Thomas, son of James R. and Mary E. (Moon) Summers, married, 1st, Miss Nettie Stephens; 2nd, Miss Mamie Shirley. They had three children: Mary Lee, Roy and Thomas.

Mary, daughter of James R. and Mary E. (Moon) Summers, married William Bullard. Alice, known as "Dump" married Mr. Norrell, and died in 1904, leaving three children: Charles, James and Oscar, who are on the Police Force of Birmingham, Alabama. Ida, daughter of James R. and Mary E. (Moon) Summers, is unmarried, and lives with her brother, J. Robert.

William, son of James R. and Mary E. (Moon) Summers, married and lives in Paulding County. He has several children. Do not know the name of his wife who died about 1918, nor the names of his children.

DESCENDANTS OF BENJAMIN F. AND MARY (PARIS) MOON

Kate, daughter of Benjamin F. and Mary (Paris) Moon, and granddaughter of John Willingham and Prudence (Baggett) Moon, was married to W. E. Croker of Hiram, Ga., and to them were born the following children: 1st, Owen Jewell, born 1905 and married to Miss Annie Mae Finch. They have one child, Ruby, born August, 1928. 2nd, Mary Mabel, born 1911 and married to Isaac Atchison in 1928; they have one child, Lorraine, born 1929; 3rd, John Q., 4th, Geronie; 5th, Myrtis; 6th, Ocala, born about 1907, and died when about three years old.

Virgil, son of Benjamin F. and Mary (Paris) Moon, died in Texas when a young man. Odessa, daughter of Benjamin F. and Mary (Paris) Moon, married L. D. Simmons and lives at Quinlan, Texas. Bart, son of Benjamin F. and Mary (Paris) Moon, married and lives at Cash, Texas.

In the year 1897 Benjamin F. Moon married (2nd) Mrs. Clementine Buford of Greenville, Texas, and to them were born ten children, nine of whom are living, one having died in infancy, as follows: 1st, Vera V., who married a Mr. Shrader, and lives at Stanton, Texas; 2nd, Homer, who is married and lives at Cisco, Texas, 406 E. Sixth Street; 3rd, Elberta, who married a Mr. Brown, and lives at Sweet-water, Texas, (P. O. Box 1035); 4th, Benjamin Franklin, Jr.; 5th, Myrtle, who married a Mr. James and lives at Burleston, Texas; 6th, Isaac N., (P. O. Box 73) Baird, Texas; 7th, Lois, who married a Dunlap, and lives at (Box 73) Baird, Texas; 8th, Ruth, who married a Mr. Lowry and lives at Waco, Texas, and 9th, a son, William, aged 14 years, who lives at Baird, Texas.

Rachael R., daughter of John Willingham and Prudence (Baggett) Moon, born October 3rd, 1857. Married James R. Elliott of Cobb County, and moved to Birmingham, Ala., about 1890. To them were born the following children: Arthur, Marshall, James, Robert, Minnie and Ludie. Mrs. Elliott died in Birmingham about 1923.

Mariles J., daughter of John Willingham and Prudence (Baggett) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., on September 30th, 1844, and married John Summers and moved to Alabama about 1890. Mrs. Summers died about 1923. She had three sons, Charles, James and Jack, together with other children whose names we do not know. Her children live in Alabama City and Guntersville, Alabama.

Willie, daughter of John Willingham and Prudence (Baggett) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., on March 6th, 1860, and married William R. House of Cobb County. She died about the year 1896. To her and her husband were born the following children: 1st, B. Franklin, who lives in Atlanta, and is a locomotive engineer on the Seaboard Air-Line Railway; 2nd, H. Grady, who married Miss Mabel Graham of Hiram, Georgia, where they now reside. They have several children whose names we do not know, except a son, named Jack; 3rd, Luther, who married a Miss Cohran of Paulding County, Ga. His wife died about 1920, leaving six or seven children, whose names we do not know; 4th, Bertha, who married J. Robert Summers; 5th, Blanch, who married William Hendrix: 6th, Kate; 7th, W. Oscar, who died in 1925. He was never married.

THOMAS B. MOON AND HIS DESCENDANTS

Thomas B., son of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, and a brother of John Willingham Moon, was born in Columbia County, Ga., June 19th, 1810; married Ameliann Davis August 12th, 1828. To them were born six children: Jesse Benjamin Edom, born in 1831 and died in infancy; William Francis, born December 17, 1831; Woodson Daniel, born February 15th, 1833; Elizabeth Sarah, born May 11th, 1835, and married her cousin, Thomas Jefferson Moon; Lydia Ann, born August 7th, 1837; Rachael Rebecca, born August 16th, 1840, and died in infancy.

Woodson Daniel, son of Thomas B. and Ameliann (Davis) Moon, and grandson of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, February 15th, 1833; married Miss Charlotte Ann Hammock, daughter of Asa Hammock, December 24th, 1854. To them were born six children, as follows: Mary Lewis, born October 10th, 1855, and died March 9th, 1856; Pocahontas, born December 5th, 1856, and died November 6th, 1858; Benjamin Franklin, born September 7th, 1855; Hilmon, born April 11th, 1860; Albert Sidney Johnson, born April 2nd, 1862; Sarah, Ann, born October 24th, 1863. Woodson Daniel Moon, lived in Walton County, Georgia. He enlisted in Company "G" 35, Ga. Regiment Confederate Army, in 1863, and served until he was killed in the Battle of Hanover Junction, Virginia, May 23rd, 1864.

Lydia Ann, second daughter of Thomas B. and Ameliann (Davis) Moon, born in Walton County, Georgia, August 7th, 1837, and married Gip Bullard of Cobb County. To them were born several children, among whom were: Woodson D., Willis, Lizzie, who married Joseph Paris of Paulding County, Olivia, who married A. C. Moore of Paulding County. (A. C. Moore was son of Sarah N. E. (Moon) Moore and a grandson of John (Willingham) Moon, and a third cousin to his wife.) Addie, who married John Cathcart of Atlanta. Perry G. and Robert T. of Tioga, Texas.

Benjamin Franklin, son of Woodson D. and Charlotte (Hammock) Moon, born in Walton County, Georgia, September 7th, 1858. He married Miss Sudie Almond, daughter of H. P. Almond, of Rockdale County, Georgia. They had only one child and it died in infancy. After the death of his first wife he married a Mrs. Fretwell. He was a successful merchant of Jackson, Ga., for many years. He died in 1911.

Hillmon Allen, son of Woodson D. and Charlotte (Hammock) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on April 11th, 1860, and was married to Miss Lula Almond, daughter of H. P. Almond, of Conyers, Rockdale County, Georgia. They had two children, Beaula Ann, born October 2nd, 1884, and married Les Hollingsworth and H. C., born April 20th, 1886, and married Miss Orrie Cornwell.

Mr. Moon lived in Rockdale County until his death. After the death of his first wife he married a Mrs. Daughtry. He was an invalid for many years prior to his death.

Albert Sidney Johnson, son of Woodson D. and Charlotte (Hammock) Moon, and grandson of Thomas B. and Ameliann (Davis) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 2nd, 1862, and was married to Miss Cornelia Peek, on December 15th, 1886. His wife was a daughter of J. H. and Jennie (Chandler) Peek. Unto them were born twelve children: David F., born October 29th, 1887, and married Miss Rosie Hutson, and after her death was married to her sister, Fannie; Charlotte, born January 26th, 1889, and died in infancy; Henry A., born April 16th, 1890, and married Miss Rosie Stephenson, and had three children; Parrie Sadie, born November 17th, 1891, and married J. J. Stephenson, Jr., son of Rev. J. J. Stephenson, and unto them was born one child, Sadie Joe; Bobbie W., born October 2nd, 1893, and died September 2nd, 1912; Asa M., born February 9th, 1896, Mattie Julia, born January 25th, 1898; William Ottis, born July 9th, 1899, Leora, born September 22nd, 1901; Cornelia Opal, born April 15th, 1903; Annie Pearl, born April 22nd, 1905, and died January 6th, 1919, and Sidney Idus, born August 2nd, 1907. His children all received a good education.

Mr. Moon was a successful farmer, and owned one of the very best farms in Walton County. He died in 1928.

Sarah Ann, daughter of Woodson D. and Charlotte Hammock Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, October 21st, 1863, and married Thomas Smith. Unto them were born seven children: Cordell, Woodson, Jr., Florence, Buna, Levi, Willis and Homer. Most of these children are married and have families. Mr. Smith lives at Grayson, Ga.

DESCENDANTS OF LYDlA ANN (MOON) AND GIP BULLARD

Lizzie, daughter of Lydia Ann (Moon) and Gip Bullard, married Joseph S. Paris, son of N. W. Paris, of Paulding County, and to them were born the following children: Winnie, who married H. C. Sorrells; Lura, who married Joe Brightwell; Clinton, who married Miss Morris of Charlotte, N. C.; and Willette, who is unmarried.

Winnie, daughter of Joseph S. and Lizzie Paris, married H. C. Sorrells in 1915. Mr. Sorrells was a son of Mattie (Rakestraw) and W. B. Sorrells. They have the following children: Elizabeth, Virginia; Carolyn and Henry, Jr. Mr. Sorrells is a conductor on the Southern Railway and lives in Atlanta.

Woodson D., son of Lydia Ann (Moon) Bullard, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1866, and married Miss Anna Martin. To them were born the following children: Ethel, Lydia and Dee. Mr. Bullard lived his entire life in the community where he was born. He was a prosperous farmer and an exemplary citizen. He died in 1928.

Willis, son of Lydia Ann (Moon) and Gip Bullard, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., about the year 1870 and has lived in the same community until the present time and has been engaged in farming. He, too, is an excellent citizen and prosperous. He married Miss Mollie Petree and they have had the following children: Orin, who married Lizzie Hardy, daughter of Harriet (Moon) Hardy, about 1910, and was killed in an automobile accident about 1918; Fonnie, who married Miss Raiford Croker of Hiram, Ga.; Wade, who is unmarried, and Jessie who married Dennis Daniels.

Perry G. Bullard, son of Gip and Lydia (Moon) Bullard, and grandson of Thomas B. and Ameliann (Davis) Moon, and great-grandson of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, was born near Powder Springs, Ga., where he still resides; he married Miss Effie McCown, daughter of John and Eliza (Sorrells) McCown, and granddaughter of Russell Beasley and Rosanna (Lindley) Sorrells. To them were born the following children: Lillie Mae, who married Pickett Rice; Rosa Lee, who married Sim Ellis; Bonnie B., who married Frank Moon, son of Robert D. and Lola (Reeves) Moon; Margaret and Charlie.

Polly Moon (Baggett)

Polly, daughter of Jesse and Rachael (Willingham) Moon, and sister of John Willingham Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1804, and married Burton Baggett. They settled on a farm near Powder Springs, Cobb County, Georgia, about the year 1837. They had previously lived in Columbia or Walton County. Unto them were born fifteen children. They had ten sons in the Confederate Army. A son, Hiram W., married Miss Julia Ward, and they had several children who now live in Texas. The town of Hiram, Ga., was named for Hiram W. Baggett. Bebe Baggett another son, lives now at Marietta, Ga. He had several children, all girls. Martha, a daughter of Polly Moon and Burton Baggett, married Isaac N. Gray of Hiram. They had a large number of children, as follows: Joseph, Isaac N., Pinkney, John, Mary, who married John Hunt; Lizzie, who married Lyda Rakestraw; Ella, who married Warren Compton, and Emma. who married Edward Wheeler of Atlanta. Emma and Edward Wheeler have two sons: Pinkney and George.

Elizabeth Baggett, daughter of Polly (Moon) and Burton Baggett, married John Rakestraw of Cobb County, and to them were born two children: Emma, who married John D. Moore, who was a grandson of John Willingham Moon, and a third cousin to her.

The other daughter of Elizabeth (Baggett) and John Rakestraw was named Mattie and married W. Bennett Sorrells of Cobb County. To them were born the following children: Homer, Esker, Henry, Emma, Lennie and Eunice. (Eunice Sorrells, granddaughter of Elizabeth (Baggett) Rakestraw and great-granddaughter of Polly (Moon) Baggett, married John William Moon, the author of this book. John William Moon was a grandson of John Willingham Moon, who was a brother of Polly (Moon) Baggett. Family record of John William Moon will be seen in another part of this book.

Homer D. Sorrells, son of W. B. and Mattie (Rakestraw) Sorrells, and grandson of Elizabeth (Baggett) and John Rakestraw, and great-grandson of Burton and Polly (Moon) Baggett, was born January 25th, 1876, and married Miss Minnie Hallman of Vila Rica, Ga. They have two children: Ernest and Herman. Herman graduates from the Georgia School of Technology in 1930 with a degree in architecture.

DESCENDANTS OF JESSE AND CRECY (WILLINGHAM) MOON

Lewis, son of Jesse and Crecy (Willingham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, and married Miss Katie Webb. They had several children, but only know the names of three: John, (nicknamed Jack) Woodson and Cash.

Patsy, daughter of Jesse and Crecy (Willingham) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, and was married to James Webb. They had the following children: Andrew, who was a Primitive Baptist Minister; Wiley, John, James and Elizabeth. Mr. Webb was a Primitive Baptist Minister. His son, John, moved to Louisiana in 1890.

Elizabeth (commonly known as "Betsie"), daughter of Jessie and Crecy (Willingham) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, and married Augustus Clay, to whom were born several children, among whom were Dollie, who married a Lester the first time, and next George W. Moon, her cousin; and Henry C., who married Susan Graham, daughter of David Graham.

Rachael, daughter of Jesse and Crecy (Willingham) Moon was born in Columbia County, Georgia, and married Jack Griffin. To them were born the following children:. Jesse, Thomas, John, who married Miss Fannie Willingham; Laura, who married an Irwin; Sandy, who was never married; Nancy, who married a Baker; Sallie, who married a Wallace; Crecy, who married Sam Needham; Rebecca, who married Jack Needham; and Rachael, who married Bill Lyle.

Nelope, daughter of Jesse and Crecy (Willingham) Moon, was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1812 and married Sanford Fulse. They only had one child, a son, Calvin. Calvin had only two children: Maggie, who married Rufus Hutchins, a lawyer, of Tallapoosa; and Callie, who married, a Mr. Simmons, a merchant of Atlanta, where she and her husband live. Maggie and her husband have both been dead for many years. They had one child, but do not know whether it is living or not.

Madison, son of Jesse and Crecy (Willingham) Moon, and grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, was born October 30th, 1815, and married, 1st, Miss Mary Richardson, his first cousin. To them were born seven children: Rollie, who married Arbel Moon of Cobb County; John and William who moved to Texas; three others who died when quite young and Amy, who married Andrew J. Swords of Walton County, in 1859. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Moon was married to Miss Margaret Calloway, and to them were born thirteen children. Madison Moon died in 1887.

Amy, daughter of Madison and Mary (Richardson) Moon, was married to Andrew J. Swords and to them were born nine children: Mary E., John M., Fannie W., William H., James T., A. F., Annie, Carrie B., and Sallie W. Mr. Swords, the husband of Amy Moon Swords, enlisted in Company D, Second Georgia Cavalry, Confederate Army, in 1862, and served throughout the war and was in many important battles.

Martha Ann, daughter of Madison and Margaret (Calloway) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, and was married, 1st, to Kerney Eubanks, and to them were born the following children: Asa, who married a Cannon the first time and a Cox the second time; Lizzie, who married David Smith. They had eight children; Sidney, who married Lizzie Cannon, had three children: Clark, Annie Lee, and Minnie; and Nancy, who married Robert Bennett. They had four children: Cora Lee, Aline, Jewel and Alice.

William, son of Madison and Margaret (Calloway) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, and married Janie Wells. They had two children, Vernon and Birdie.

Ludie, daughter of Madison and Margaret (Calloway) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, and married Mark Sanders. They had seven children: Myrtis, Curtis, Clarence, Ethel, Sarah, Clyde and one that died in infancy.

Jesse, son of Madison and Margaret (Calloway) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, and married Annie Johnson. They had four children: Grover, Arthur, James and Cramer.

Mary Jane, daughter of Madison and Margaret (Calloway) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia and married, 1st, Tom Smith ; 2nd, James Cramer. She only had one child, Thomas.

Sandal, daughter of Madison and Margaret (Calloway) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 24th, 1868, and was married to J. W. Hawkins, on December 29th, 1887. To them were born nine children as follows: Alice, born January 17th, 1889; Luke, born March 25th, 1892; Fay, born August 1st, 1894, Ottie, born November 1st, 1897; Arrie, born January 6th, 1899; Rufus, born November, 1900; Gladys, born January, 1904; Buck, born March, 1908; Pat, born March, 1910. Mr. Hawkins was a native of Alabama, but after he married he located in Gwinnett County, Georgia, where he has been engaged in farming.

SANDALL (MOON) BOOKOUT AND THE BOOKOUT FAMILY

We have already learned that Marmaduke Bookout of Randolph County, North Carolina, married Rachael Moon, daughter of John and Mary (Farmer) Moon, and sister of John Moon, the progenitor of the Moon family of Georgia. Charles Bookout, a grandson of Marmaduke and Rachael (Moon) Bookout, came to Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1800. He was married twice. We do not know the name of his first wife; he married, second, Sandal Moon (known as Aunt Sallie), daughter of Jesse and Crecy (Willingham) Moon, and half sister of John Willingham Moon. She was born in Columbia County, Georgia, about the year 1810, and married about the year 1828. Her husband was several years older than her. It will be observed that Charles Bookout and his wife, Sandal, were related, both having descended from John and Mary (Farmer) Moon of North Carolina.

About the year 1840 Charles Bookout and his family moved to Cobb County, and settled near Powder Springs, and near the line of Paulding County. To them were born the following children: Rachael, (doubtless named for Rachael Moon Bookout of North Carolina), Lewis, Marmon (short for Marmaduke) and Cash.

Rachael Bookout married Cicero Pool of Paulding County, and to them were born the following, children: 1st, John, who married a Miss Vaughan and had two children: Blanche, who married John Roper and Kate who married Joseph Jones; 2nd, William, who married a Miss White and had several children. He was a merchant at Yorkville, Paulding County, Georgia; 3rd, Lou, who married Samuel Johnson.

Marmon, or Marmaduke, Bookout went to Texas. We do not know anything of his family. Cash Bookout married and lived near Powder Springs. He had one son, John J., who moved to Atlanta, and for many years has been successfully engaged in the jewelry and optical goods business.

Lewis Bookout married Miss Carrie Hill. To them were born the following children: John, Jesse, Lewis, Maggie and Vesta, Lewis, Sr. died when his children were all small.

John, son of Lewis and Carrie (Hill) Bookout, married Miss Ella Meadows, and settled near Powder Springs, Ga. They had the following children: 1st, Denie, who married Pollie Umphrey and died about 1907; 2nd, Clarence, who married Ophelia Davis; 3rd, Irene, who married John Pool, and Cecil, who is unmarried. John Bookout died when his children were small. His widow still lives near Powder Springs, Ga.

Lewis, Jr., son of Lewis and Carrie (Hill) Bookout, married Miss Vesta Head and moved to Texas. His wife died leaving several children and Mr. Bookout married again. We regret our inability to furnish the names of his last wife or of any of his children.

Maggie, daughter of Lewis and Carrie (Hill) Bookout, married Joseph Thompson in 1881. They had four children, who lived to the age of maturity: Maude; Thella, who married Hume A. Henderson and lives at Austell, Ga.; Rolland and Corthell. Joseph Thompson died in 1906 and his wife in 1914. Corthell married and lives in New York City.

Rolland, son of Joseph and Maggie (Bookout) Thompson, married Miss Leora Black of Texas. They had three children: Byron, Louise and Hollen. Rolland and his wife both died in 1913. His children live in Texas.

Maude, daughter of Joseph and Maggie (Bookout) Thompson, married Coleman Meadows, who died about 1910, leaving his widow and three children: Ben Hill, Morel and Eunice, all of whom live in Atlanta.

Vesta, daughter of Lewis and Carrie (Hill) Bookout, married Oscar Kimberly. They lived for several years at Powder Springs, Ga., but for several years they have lived at R. F. D. No. 4, Tyler, Tex. They have several sons, one of whom is a Baptist Minister. We regret that we do not know their names.

Jesse, son of Lewis and Carrie (Hill) Bookout, married Miss Margaret Shipp, daughter of John and Margaret (Bullard) Shipp. Her father, John Shipp, was a son of John and Lizzie (Moon) Shipp, of Cobb County. Lizzie (Moon) Shipp was a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, and an aunt of Sandal (Moon) Bookout. It will be seen that Jesse Bookout and his wife were related. They had the following children: Maggie, who married J. T. Moore, and lives in Atlanta; Bertha, who married Homer Wilson, and live near Powder Springs; Della, who married Harry Michael about 1920, and died about 1928 leaving several small children; Dovie, who married Clarence Dupree and died about 1914; Beatrice, who married and lived at Calhoun, Ga.; Lois, who married Harry Lindley; Henry and Weyman. The two last named are unmarried. Jesse Bookout died at Powder Springs in 1926.

JOSEPH MOON AND HIS DESCENDANTS

Joseph Moon, (1796-1893) youngest son of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon, and grandson of John Moon, whose wife was Miss Baldwin, daughter of Captain David Baldwin; was born in Columbia County, where he remained until the year 1819, when he moved to Walton County, Georgia, near Logansville, where he lived and engaged in farming until his death. In 1824 he married Miss Edith Hutson and to them were born four children: William E., Cresy, Susie and Thomas. After the death of his first wife, he married Miss Martha Jones, in the year 1833, and to them were born fourteen children: Stephen LaFayette, Joseph DeKalb, George W., Catherine, Andrew J., Josephine, Augustus J., Edom T., Charles K. P., Sarah E., Franklin Pierce, Jesse L., Columbus and Martha.

At the age of seventy-five, death having claimed his second wife, he married the third time to Luranie Thompson, and lived with her nearly twenty-three. years. He had no children by his third wife. At the time of his death in 1893 he had living, eighteen children, one hundred grandchildren, one hundred and seven great-grandchildren and ten great-great-grand-children, a total of two hundred and thirty-five descendants.

He had eight sons and one grandson in the Confederate Army. William, LaFayette, DeKalb and Edom volunteered in the fall of 1861, enlisting at Walnut Grove, Walton County, in Company G, Thirty-fifth Ga., Regiment. George W., Andrew J. and Augustus J., enlisted in the same Company, in 1863 and Charles K. P. in 1864. They all returned at the end of the war except Andrew J., who was killed in July, 1863, at Nance's Shop, Va. They all made good soldiers during the war and good citizens after its conclusion.

Joseph Moon was a prosperous farmer and a large slave owner. He was an active member of the Baptist Church for many years, and was a Justice of the Peace for twenty years.

William E. Moon, farmer, Monroe, Walton County, Georgia, oldest son of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1826, and married December 19th, 1844, Miss Susan J. Willingham, who was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1828. She was a daughter of Cash and Martha (Moon) Willingham. They had eleven children : T. M., Fannie, C. L., J., C. A., Joseph P., Benjamin F., Stephen Douglas, Robert L., Elizabeth, William E. and Virginia.

At the close of the war Mr. Moon returned home to his family with only $13.00 and began life anew, and by industry and thrift he accumulated considerable wealth. He owned a fine farm consisting of 1150 acres.

T. M., son of William E. and Susan (Willingham) Moon was born May 24th, 1845, and was married to Miss Mary Needham. To them were born ten children: W. A., Sarah Jane, Edgar P., Alexander, Nonnie, Henry, Pullman, Clinton, Ludie and Angie. Their children all lived to maturity. He, too, served in the Confederate Army, enlisting with his father in Company G, Thirty-fifth Georgia Regiment. He was a good farmer and always made large crops. He died June 1st, 1888. His widow was living in 1920 with her daughter, Mrs. Angie Braswell.

Fannie, daughter of William and Susan (Willingham) Moon was married in 1878 to Thomas Altha. They had eight children: Susie, Ida, (who married Lon Milligan); Hassie, J. F., R. A., W. J., Pearce and Dora. Mrs. Altha died in 1915 and left a large number of grandchildren. J. F. Altha, son of Thomas and Fannie (Moon) Altha, married Bessie Stroud in 1889 and to them were born nine children: Mary, Homer, Lizzie, J. F., Lillie, William L., Hettie Rue, Charlie H., and an infant not named.

Robert L., seventh son of William E. and Susie (Willingham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1866, and was married to Miss Blanche Balknight, of Saluda, S. C., in 1903, and to them were born seven children: Robert Leland, Beulah, Nona, Clyde, Rachael and Annie.

Mr. Moon worked his way through school, graduating at the Peabody Institute, Nashville, Tenn., in 1897, after which time he engaged in teaching. In 1901 he went to the Phillipine Islands as a teacher in the service of the U. S. Government. He also visited China, Japan and other countries.

The following are the other children of William E. Moon: C. L. J., who married Miss Lula Palmer and had six children; C. A., who married Miss Savannah Shaw and had three children; W. B., Hattie, and Bessie; J. P. Moon, who married Miss Mary Robertson and had nine children; Rollie R., Fannie, Cora, Golden, Jefferson Myrtie and three that died in infancy; Benjamin F. Moon, who married Miss Mattie Aycock, and had six children, William, Lena, Laura, Erastus, and two that died in infancy; S. D. Moon, born January 30th, 1861, and married Miss Mattie Perkins the first time and had one child, Louise, and the second time he married Miss Bertha Dickinson; Elizabeth, second daughter of William E. Moon, married T. B. Robertson and they live in Texas.

William E., Jr., youngest son of William E. and Susie (Willingham) Moon, was born in Walton County, June 8th, 1871, and married Miss Mary Levie Towler, on November 11th, 1897. To them were born five children: Benjamin Robert, born August 9th, 1901; Willie Mae, born October 23rd, 1902, James Ezra, born May 28th, 1904; Nina Marie, born September 2nd, 1908, and Little Joe, born September 1st, 1911. Prior to his marriage Mr. Moon engaged in teaching but after his marriage he engaged in farming.

DESCENDANTS OF T. M. AND MARY MOON

W. A., oldest son of T. M. and Mary (Needham) Moon, married a daughter of Lewis Green, of Walton County, and had eight children as follows: Alma, Furman, Lennie, William H., Frank, Pirkle, Annie and Carl.

Hill Moon married Miss Hesta Graham and had ten children: Lydia, Grady, Clifford, Maggie, Ed., Marion and three that died in infancy.

Alexander Moon was married to Gelilie Gresham and they had nine children: Luther, James, Jettie, Erastus, Zelma, Huie, Jesse, Bertha, and one that died in infancy.

Clinton Moon, married Edna Moon, daughter of C. K. P. Moon, his first cousin and unto them were born eight children: Linkie, Pearlie, Mattie Lee, Flawdie, Elzie, Estelle, Birt and Effie.

Pullman Moon had five children as follows: Mamie, Paul, Nora, Lucy R. and Jewel.

Angie Moon married Mark Braswell, son of Non Braswell, and they had five children: Hoke, Blanche, Jonathan, Pullman, and one that died in infancy.

Nonnie Moon was married to T. O. Moon, son of C. K. P. Moon. They had three children: Zuma, Bertha and Ethel.

Crecy, daughter of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, abou the year 1828, and was married twice, the first time to a Hammock and the second time to Marion Jacobs of Gwinnett County. She had no children. She died at Grayson, Gwinnett County, Georgia, in 1900.

Susan, daughter of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, February 13th, 1830, and married Thomas Moon the first time. After his death she married Willis Irwin, son of Christopher Irwin. To them were born six children: Frank A., M. C., J. R., Mark, C. B., and Kernelia. Mr. Irwin resided on a farm in Walton County for many years. In 1878 he moved to Conyers, Ga., where he died. After the death of Mr. Irwin, Susan his widow, resided at the old homestead for several years, then broke up housekeeping and lived for a time with her daughter, Mrs. W. B. Barrett, Jersey, Ja., later she lived with her son, Judge Frank A. Irwin, at Cedartown, Ga.

Frank A. Irwin, son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, and grandson of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, was born in Walton County, October 27th, 1852, and was married June 6th, 1888, to Miss Mollie Young, daughter of James Young of Polk County, Georgia. To them were born five children: Francis D. R., born April 10th, 1889; Eugene R., born April 29th, 1893: Charles L., born May 19th, 1896; Annie Neley, born May 27th, 1889, and Mary C., born October 8th, 1902.

Mr. Irwin attended the country schools, and after reaching maturity worked and paid his way through the high school at Conyers, Ga.; he then read law with his uncle, Judge David Irwin, of Marietta, Ga., and was admitted to the bar there in 1877. After he married he moved to Cedartown, where he practiced law until 1901, when he was appointed by Governor Candler as Judge of the City Court of Polk County, which position he held for three terms of four years each. He was elected to the judgeship of the Tallapoosa Circuit in 1918 and again in 1922.

J. R., lawyer and farmer, son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, and grandson of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on December 11th, 1854, and was married to Miss Haden Overbay, on December 11th, 1875. To them were born four children: Irene, Callie, Howard and Grady. He, like his brother, Frank, worked his way through school and read law under Col. J. N. Glenn, and was admitted to the bar in 1885 and has practiced his profession successfully since.

After the death of his first wife in 1900 he married Miss Mary E. Peek on November 26th, 1903. She was a daughter of Col. William Peek of Rockdale County, Georgia. He served one term as Mayor of Conyers.

Milton C., son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, was born in Walton County, and married Miss Mollie Mitchell and to them were born five children: Clinton, Estelle, Homer, Walter and Ruth. He was a successful farmer and a hard working man.

Mary C., daughter of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, was born in Walton County, Georgia, January 14th, 1861, and was married to W. B. Barrett, son of Dr. Barrett. To them were born five children as follows: Minnie Eugene, born August 17th, 1887; Margaret Inez, born November 10th, 1888, and was married to Thomas C. Dally, April 17th, 1918, and has one child, Thomas Barrett; Myrtie N., born September 22nd, 1890, and was married to Berry A. Wiley on September 3rd, 1907, and has three children, Mary N., Louise and Inez: William Irwin, born September 3rd, 1895; Guy J., born February 7th, 1898. Mr. Barrett by thrift and industry has accumulated considerable property, including several hundred acres of good farm lands.

Mark D., son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1864, and was married to Miss Emma Peek, daughter of Col. William Peek, and they have one child, Mark D. About the year 1885, he organized the "Solid South," a weekly paper of Rockdale County; later he edited the "Farmers Alliance," a paper published in Atlanta. He graduated in law from the University of Virginia, after which he began the practice of law. He served one term in the State Senate from the Thirty-fourth District and made a fine record as a legislator.

C. B., son of Willis and Susan (Moon) Irwin, was born in Walton County, Georgia, August 16th, 1874, and married Miss Miriam Stephenson, daughter of W. J. Stephenson, of Lithonia. He is a first class jewelsmith, which business he has followed for several years.

Thomas, son of Joseph and Edith (Hutson) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, about the year 1832. He went to Texas in 1858 or 1859 and died two years later. He was never married.

Stephen LaFayette Moon, farmer, Logansville, Walton County, Georgia, son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, October 28th, 1834. He was a grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Brooks) Moon. He was Second Lieutenant in Company G, Thirty-fifth Georgia Regiment, Confederate Army, and participated in many battles, including Seven Pines, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He was wounded in the

Ida J., daughter of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on March 23, 1872. On February 16th, 1888, she was married to Y. P. Carter, son of Matthew Carter. They had only one child, Dessie Vera, born in Walton County, February 12th, 1890. She graduated from the Georgia Normal and Industrial School at Milledgeville, Ga. On September 15th, 1909, she was married to C. C. Weaver. They had two children: Carter and Emeline. Mr. Weaver graduated from the University of Georgia, and taught school for several years. He is also a progressive farmer.

Alice Elizabeth, daughter of LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, November 13th, 1873, and was married to Robert E. Smith, son of Jasper Smith, in January, 1894, To them were born five children: Grace, born October 21st, 1894, and was married to Tum Altha, July 5th, 1914, and they have two children, Clark and Nelson; Ralph, born December 26th, 1896; Carl, born January 8th, 1899; Lucile, born December 17th, 1908, and Dorsy, born July 6th, 1914.

Sereptha Angeline, daughter of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, May 3rd, 1875. She joined the Baptist Church when quite young, and was married on December 3rd, 1896, to A. O. Cowan, son of J.W. Cowan. Mr. Cowan is a member of the Christian Church, a Mason, and prosperous farmer, owning several hundred acres of land in Rockdale County. To Mr. and Mrs. Cowan were born five children: Annie, Edward LaFayette, William Clifford, Ernest and one that died in infancy. Mrs. Cowan died in 1903. Edward, the oldest son, graduated from the A. & M. School at Monroe, in 1915, and is now putting his knowledge into practice on the farm.

Marshall LaFayette, son of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on June 23rd, 1877, and was married December 30th, 1899, to Miss Ethel Hogan, and have had born to them five children: Rosie, Thomas, Lena Belle, Walter and Stephen LaFayette. He lives near Logansville, Ga.

Gordon DeKalb, son of Stephen LaFayette and Anna (Cooper) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on July 7th, 1880, and was married December, 1906, to Miss Della Thompson. They had two children.

Joseph DeKalb, son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born November 27th, 1835, and was married on December 20th, 1857, to Miss Zippora Cannon. He was a grandson of Thomas and Sarah Brooks Moon. To Mr. and Mrs. Moon were born four children: Albert F., Walter D., Homer C., and Myrtie C. After being confined to his bed for four years Mr. Moon died in 1915, and his body was brought back to Georgia and buried at the Cannon cemetery, near Walnut Grove.

Mr. Moon was among the first in Georgia to invest in pure bred dairy cattle. as early as 1884 he was buying registered Jerseys and paying as high as $265.00 each for them, while scrub cows were selling for $20.00. He soon built up a large herd of pure bred Jerseys. He built one of the first silos ever built in the State. In 1889 he sold his beautiful farm in Walton County, and moved to Maryland, and later to Washington, D. C. He was a member of the Christian Church, at Corinth, while he resided in Georgia.

Albert F., son of Joseph DeKalb and Zippora (Cannon) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, January 15th, 1859. He graduated from Emory College in 1882 with first honors. he taught school after graduating, three years in Georgia, one in Tennessee and three years in North Carolina. After moving with his father to Maryland in 1889, he married September 7th, 1892, Miss Effie Hill, of that State, and is engaged in farming in Virginia. They had an only son, Hubert H., who graduated from Cornell University in 1918. He married Miss Anna Mitchell on July 6th, 1919.

Walter D., son of Joseph DeKalb and Zippora (Cannon) Moon, and grandson of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, December 29th, 1864. He attended Covington High School and graduated at Emory College. He went to Maryland with his father in 1889, where he engaged in farming until 1905, when he accepted a position with the Traction Street Railway Company, in Washington, D. C., as engineer of the Power Plant. He remained there until 1901 when he accepted a position with the U. S. Government as engineer in the power plant of the Smokeless Powder Factory at Indian Head, Maryland, where he still remains.

On July 28th, 1908, he married Miss Nellie W. Mitchell of Parker, Spottsylvania County, Virginia. To them were born five children as follows: Routh Anna, born May 16th, 1910; Florence Walton, born March 20th, 1912; Edith May, born March 7th, 1913; Nellie Louise, born March 28th, 1914, and died in infancy; Walter, born May 26th, 1916. Mr. Moon is vice-president of the Indian Head Bank.

Homer C., son of Joseph and Zippora (Cannon) Moon, and grandson of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, May 2nd, 1871. He entered Emory University but did not graduate on account of his father moving away to Maryland. He held several good positions in Baltimore and other places as engineer. On May 2nd, 1894, he was married to Miss Grace Ward. They had one child, Homer, who died from cancer of the throat in 1919.

Myrtie C., daughter of Joseph Dekalb and Zippora (Cannon) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 20th, 1875. When fourteen years old she went with her father to Maryland, where she completed her education, and where she taught music for several years. On June 29, 1904, she married H. S. Hodges of Ayden, N. C.

George W., son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in the year 1838, and married Mrs. Dollie Lester. To them were born 'five children: Betsy, who married T. J. Kiskadon of Lebanon, La., and had one child, Joseph G. W.; Joe, who married R. L. Stewart of Koran, La.; Sallie, who married D. J. James, Sailes, La.; and one infant that died when he lived in Georgia. He was a faithful member of the Baptist Church.

Catherine, daughter of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on March 20th, 1837, and married Thomas L. Moon, on, January 14th, 1855. To them were born four children: Thomas Joseph Tillman, born October 2nd, 1855, and died November 25th, 1895; Lewis Charles L., born February 7th, 1859, and died May 16th, 1910; Nonnie, born January 15th, 1857, and married William Simpson and had eight children as follows: Cora, Alexander, Thomas, Lola, Joseph, James, Orien, Myrtle and Vivian. Nonnie, daughter of Catherine and Thomas L. Moon, died February 28th, 1918.

Addie, daughter of Thomas L. and Catherine Moon, was born February 20th, 1861, and married J. J. Humphries on June 20th, 1885, and to them were born eight children: Jessie Irene, Bessie Inez, Thomas Josiah, Annie Runie, Oliver Homer, Ernest Noble, Frederic and Hugh. Mr. Humphries and his family resides at Norcross, and owns large farming interests in Gwinnett County.

Thomas L. Moon, the father of the above named children, was a son of Elijah Moon. He served the Confederacy during the Civil War as a private in Company G Thirty-fifth Regiment until his death November 13, 1862, of small pox.

After the death of her husband Mrs. Addie (moon) Humphries was married to Wilson L. Mitchell on December 6th, 1865, and to them were born five children: Joshua, who married Nettie Long, daughter of R. A. and Josephine (Moon) Long, a first cousin, and to them were born six children. He was a carpenter and contractor and resided in Alabama at the time of his death.

James R. Mitchell, son of Wilson L. and Catherine (Moon) Mitchell, was born April 16th, 1869, and married Miss Floy Elizabeth Baker on December 24th, 1894. To them were born eleven children: Farrish Furman, Merrett DeKalb, James Curtis, Thomas Nelson, Samuel Kennett (deceased), Susan Matilda, Marion E., Wilson Franklin and Margaret Ulala. Mr. Wilson is a progressive farmer.

Mattie Belle, daughter of Wilson L. and Catherine Mitchell, was born in Walton County, Georgia, and was married to Samuel N. Martin in 1895, and to them were born two children.

Susan, daughter of Catherine (Moon) and Wilson L. Mitchell, was married to Alexander M. Gill in 1895, and they have two children.

Frederick, third son of Catherine (Moon) and Wilson L. Mitchell, was married to Miss Candy Stephens in 1901 and they have two children.

Augustus J., son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, March 15th, 1842, and was married to Miss Elizabeth Graham, daughter of David Graham, on May 11th, 1865. They had five children: Emma, Savannah, Mary, Cora and Alonzo. After the death of his first wife he married Miss Dora Graham. Emma, the oldest daughter of Mr. Moon married George Camp and had one child. She only lived one year after her marriage.

Savannah, daughter of Augustus J. and Elizabeth (Graham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, August 24th, 1868, and was married to Aufie Lucas on December 13th, 1894. They had three children: Augustus M., born October 2nd, 1895, and married Miss Nora Peek, December 28th, 1917, and have one child, Thomas Clifford; and John W., born April 29th, 1898; Viola, born July 12th, 1904. Mrs. Lucas is a member of the Baptist Church, while her husband is a member of the Christian Church.

Cora, daughter of Augustus J. and Elizabeth (Graham) Moon, was born in Newton County, July 30th, 1878.

Alonzo, the only son of Augustus J. and Elizabeth (Graham) Moon, was born in Newton County on August 6th, 1874, and was married to Miss Manda Owens in August, 1902. To them were born six children: Parrie, Clara, Carrie, Turner, Floyd and Annie B.

Mary, daughter of Augustus and Elizabeth (Graham) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on February 14th, 1871, and was married to William B. Humphries on September 21st, 1890. They had seven children: Aaron, born April 25th, 1902; Carl, born February 20th, 1904; Aldean, born December 25th, 1910; J. B., born October 9th, 1912; Myrtle, born March 6th, 1914; two other children died in infancy.

Andrew J., son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, April 21st, 1840, and was married to Miss Mary Ann Blake on December 1st, 1859; they had an only daughter, Martha C., who was born October, 1860, and married T. N. Simonton, son of George R. Simonton, on March 1st, 1885.

Martha C. (Moon) Simonton had nine children as follows: Mary Lizzie, who married Richard Rice; Beulah, who married Noon Willowford; George Robert, deceased; Jennie, John, Olin, Zollie, Mollie and Powell.

Andrew J. Moon served in the Confederate Army until he was killed in battle in July, 1863. His widow, Mary A., died February 26th, 1915.

Josephine Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, April 29th, 1844, and was married to Richard A. Long in 1859. To them were born seven children: Jefferson D., Richard L., Mattie, Joseph Erastus, Nettie and Mollie.

Richard A. Long was born in 1831. He enlisted in the Confederate Army and served until he received a wound in the hip, which caused his death on May 13th, 1879. He was a prosperous farmer and a good citizen.

After the death of her first husband Josephine Elizabeth (Moon) Long was married to Lee Long, in 1883. They had one child that died in infancy.

Jefferson D., son of Richard A. and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County on August 9th, 1860, and was married to Miss Sallie Cox, daughter of Richard Cox. To them were born one child, Ethel, who married William A. Cooper.

After the death of his first wife Mr. Long was married to Miss Janie Brand and to them were born four children. Mr. Long was an excellent singer and organist, and a Baptist minister. He had a promising future, when he died from typhoid fever at the age of 31 years.

Richard R., son of Richard A. and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, on February 8th, 1861, and was married to Miss Ludie Myers, daughter of Shepard Myers. He died from typhoid fever in 1890.

Joseph Erastus, son of Richard A. and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, October 10th, 1869, and was married to Miss Lucy Brand, daughter of Eudock Brand. To them were born five children: Eric, born March 27th, 1893, Cloe, born June 2nd, 1898; D. Richard, born January 22, 1901; Nell, born March 23rd, 1904; and Joseph, born September 30th, 1907.

Mattie, daughter of Richard A. and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, July 7th, 1867, and was married to James C. Tribble. They had three children; Daisy, who married Joseph P. Day; Albert, who is in Tennessee, and Jesse L., who married Evelyn Graham, and they have three children. Mattie died October 3rd, 1890.

Nettie, daughter of Richard A. and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, August 30th, 1871, and was married to Joshua Mitchell, her first cousin, and they had eight children.

Mollie, daughter of Richard A. and Josephine (Moon) Long, was born in Walton County, Georgia, September 20th, 1875, and was married to Jodie Myers and had ten children.

Edom T., son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, December 14th, 1845, and was married to Elizabeth Webb, daughter of Rev. James Webb, on September 2nd, 1866. To them were born ten children: Troy L., Maggie, Coleman, Lou, Arie, Zippora, Gertrude, Mack, Maud and Tillie.

Mr. Moon in his young days taught school and studied law and was admitted to the bar on February 17th, 1886. He practiced his profession until his death on November 28th, 1908.

Troy, son of Edom T., and Elizabeth (Webb) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, February 2nd, 1868, and was married to Miss Ida Cooper on November 1st, 1888. To them were born fourteen children: Cornelius L., Ranford B., Roscoe W., Matthews W., Lena, Ruby L., Jeannette, Rama, Lillie Mae, Mary L., Joseph S., and Ida.

The other children of Edom T. and Elizabeth (Webb) Moon, married as follows: Maggie, married Alexander S. Rutledge and has four children. Coleman, died young; Lou married Richard Swords and had five children: Arie married James Oliver, son of Pink Oliver, and had eleven children; Zippora, married Alexander Oliver and had nine children: Gertrude married Whit W. Curry and had six children; Mack died when a young man and was unmarried; Maude, married Oliver Ragsdale and had five children; Tillie married Jack Rollins and had five children.

Charles K. P., son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, March 23rd, 1847, and was married to Miss Dee Guthrie in 1867. To them were born eleven children: Oscar, born in 1872 and married Nonnie Moon in 1893, and they had three children, Zuma, Bertha and Ethel; Sarah E.; Nancy T., married Benjamin Black and had two children; Foster, born in 1874. Do not know who he married. He had seven children: Grady, Otis, Herschel, Annie Belle, Lucile, Irene and one that died in infancy; Edna, who married Clinton Moon, her cousin, and they had eight children; Pinkie, Pearlie, Mattie Lee, Flaudie; Elzie, Estelle, Birt and Effie; Emory, who married Miss Mollie Odum in 1904, and had seven children, Duren, Edwin, Gladys, Ezma, and three that died in infancy; Essie, who married Andrew Wood; they had five children, Everett, Arthur, Birdis, Oliver, and one that died in infancy; Etta, who married John Crow and had eight children, Howard, Herschel, Floy, L. J., Thomas L., Grover, Velma and one that died in infancy; Pauline, a half-sister to the foregoing, married Jesse Mayfield and had one child, Carl. These children are all doing well.

After the death of his first wife, Charles K. P. Moon married Fannie Durden and had one child, Pauline.

Franklin Pierce, the youngest son of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, about the year 1851, and upon reaching maturity went to Texas. He was a farmer, and lost an arm in a cotton gin. Later he became a rural mail carrier. He was married twice and had five children.

Sarah E., daughter of Joseph and Martha (Jones) Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, in 1849, and was married to Em Sigman, and to them were born twelve children: Carrie, Elizabeth, Henry C., Anna, Walter, Grover, Richard and five others that died in infancy. Mr. Sigman and his wife are faithful members of the Baptist Church.

Martha Amy, the youngest daughter of Joseph and Martha (Jones). Moon, was born in Walton County, Georgia, about the year 1855, and was married to John Nunnally and to them were born four children:

Stewart, who married Miss Mary Lizzie Dial, daughter of David and Mary Dial. They now reside in California. We do not know who the other children married.

Martha separated from her husband and went with her son, Stewart, to California, where she was married the second time to J. J. Brown.

This concludes the descendants of Joseph Moon, covering down to the present time, five generations.

(We acknowledge indebtedness to the "History of the Moon Family" by William H. Moon, for the record of Joseph Moon and his descendants of Walton County, Georgia, as well as other Moons of Walton County.)

The Moons of Albermarle County, Virginia

Two brothers, Jacob and William Moon, born about 1720 or 1725, purchased land and settled on the Hardware river in Albermarle County, Virginia, when young men. In 1777 Jacob sold his farm and moved to Bedford County. We have been unable to get the names of his descendants. There were in the Revolutionary Army from this ounty: Lieutenants Jacob and Archelaus Moon and Private Pleasant Moon. Lieutenant Jacob was paymaster and was killed in the Battle of Guilford Court House. He was either the original settler, Jacob, or his son. Lieutenant Archelaus and Private Pleasant were probably sons of Jacob, for we fail to find their names among the children of William, Sr.

The children of William, Sr., were: William, Richard, Littlebury, Jacob, Judith, Susan, the wife of Thomas Tillman, Martha, Elizabeth and Sarah. Several of the descendants of William moved to southern Tennessee, and Judge John A. Moon, who for many years represented the Chattanooga District in the U. S. Congress was a direct descendant of him. For a complete genealogy of the descendants of William Moon, see Woods History of Albermarle County.

PLEASANT L. MOON AND HIS DESCENDANTS

William, Sr., of Albermarle County, had a son, Richard; Richard had a son, William, among other children; William married Elizabeth Hammer and his children were John, William, Roxanna, Archer, Martha, Elizabeth, Judith, Sarah, Pleasant and Mildred.

There was born near Cartersville, Ga., sometime about 1825 or 1830 Pleasant Lafayette Moon, who died about 1903. His children know nothing of his ancestry. Since the name of Pleasant as a family name is so unusual we think that almost beyond doubt he descended from the Moons of Albermarle County, and since some of the Moons of that county migrated to Southern Tennessee it is very likely that he is the Pleasant Moon, son of William and Elizabeth (Hamner) Moon.

Pleasant Lafayette Moon married Miss Sarah Morris of Cobb County. His children were John L., Joseph M., Robert T., Charlie M., Pleasant L., and Carrie D. Mr. Moon was a successful merchant.

Pleasant L., son of Pleasant and Sarah (Morris) Moon, was born April 12th, 1869, and married Miss Annie E. .Lane in 1901. His children were Pleasant Leonidas, Jr., and Sarah Annie Mae. He graduated from the Atlanta College of Pharmacy in 1888, and from the Atlanta Medical College in 1897, since which time he has been successfully engaged in the practice of medicine in Atlanta.

John L., son of Pleasant L., and Sarah (Morris) Moon, married Mrs. Lizzie Thomas of Oxford, Ga. They had five children. Mr. Moon served several years as minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was also a successful lawyer. He died in 1927.

Joseph M., married Miss Lola Puckett of Cartersville, Ga. They had two daughters. He was a successful lawyer and was also Judge of the City Court. He died in 1918.

R. T., son of Pleasant L., and Sarah (Morris) Moon, married Miss Carrie Payne of Cartersville. They have no children. He was a successful merchant. He died in 1924.

Charles M., son of Pleasant L. and Sarah (Morris) Moon, married Miss Hattie Goodwin and engaged in the mercantile business. He and his wife died young, leaving two children, Charles, who became a lawyer and judge in Oklahoma, and a daughter, Mrs. Harry Settles who lives in Indiana.

Carrie D., only daughter of Pleasant L. and Sarah (Morris) Moon, was married, 1st, to Charles L. Baker of Atlanta, Ga. After his death she married N. P. Bruce of Cartersville, Ga. Mr. Bruce is engaged in the mineral business.

THE MOONS IN OHIO

Joseph Moon of North Carolina and His Descendants

We have learned that John and Mary Farmer Moon of Randolph County, North Carolina, had five children: Rachael, John, Joseph, James, and Lawrence.

We have learned that Rachael Moon married Marmaduke Bookout and that tradition among the descendants of Joseph, (son of John and Mary Farmer Moon) is to the effect that: "John, the brother of Rachael and Joseph, went to Georgia, where he died."

Tradition among the Georgia Moons is to the effect: "That their ancestor came from North Carolina." While accepting these traditions as possibly connecting the Georgia and Ohio Moons, the writer was unwilling to assume that "Joseph" the head of the family in Ohio was the brother of "John" the head of the family in Georgia without further proof. But after years of research among the libraries, the writer finds that John Moon came to Georgia from North Carolina, Randolph County, sometime about the year 1770, and married the daughter of David Baldwin, a Captain in the Revolutionary War, and that he was the progenitor of the Moon family in Georgia. We find further that many of the descendants of John Moon, the Georgia immigrant, were named "Marmon," doubtless short for Marmaduke, and named for Marmaduke Bookout, who married Rachael Moon of North Carolina. We find further, that several of the descendants of John Moon, the head of the family in Georgia, were naming their children "Bookout," and we find that one of his descendants was named "Marmaduke B. Moon," which was doubtless intended for "Marmaduke Bookout" Moon. We find further, that a great many of the descendants of the Georgia emigrant from the time of his arrival in Georgia down to the present time are named "Rachael" which probably indicates that they were named for Rachael "Moon" Bookout of North Carolina. We find further that there are "Bookouts" in Georgia and have been for many years, and that many of the descendants of these Bookouts are naming their descendants old family names among the Moons, such as Jesse, John, Rachael, Marmon, (Marmaduke) Lewis, etc. So, everything considered, we are convinced beyond question that John Moon, the progenitor of the Georgia branch of the family and Joseph Moon the progenitor of the Ohio branch of the family were brothers.

We have stated in another part of this book that there was a James Moon and a Lawrence Moon in Georgia at a very early date. Inasmuch as the Ohio Moons have no record of James and Lawrence Moon, it is the opinion of the writer that John Moon not only came to Georgia but that his brothers, James and Lawrence, came with him, and also that the descendants of Rachel Moon and Marmaduke Bookout, also came to Georgia, although Marmaduke Bookout and his wife, Rachael, never came to Georgia, for they were in Randolph County, North Carolina, according to the census of 1790.

Joseph Moon, the Progenitor of the Moon Family of Clinton County, Ohio, and His Descendants

Joseph Moon, son of John and Mary Farmer Moon or Randolph County, North Carolina, was born about the year 1739 or 1740 He married Ann Brown, and to them were born ten sons and three daughters: 1st, Daniel, who married Ruth Hutson; 2nd, William who married Jane Hutson; 3rd, Samuel, who married Martha Routh; 4th Joseph who married Sarah Comer; 5th, John, who married Elizabeth Mount; 6th, Jesse, who married Rebecca Stidham; 7th Jane, who married John Routh; 8th, Mary, who married James Garner; 9th James who married Anna Hockett; 10th, Henry, who married Sarah Mills; 11th, Thomas, who married Elizabeth Hockett; 12th, Solomon, who married Hannah McLin; 13th Grace, who died in infancy.

In the spring of 1808, Daniel and Joseph Moon, with their families came to what was then Highland County now Clinton County, Ohio, and settled about one mile east of Martinsville.

In the fall of 1808, Samuel and John Moon and John Routh, their brother in law and their wives and children, migrated to Ohio and settled in the neighborhood with their relatives.

Samuel Moon was a native of Randolph County, North Carolina, and his wife, Martha (Routh) Moon, was a native of Chatham County, North Carolina.

Samuel Moon

Samuel Moon was born April 17th, 1781, and his wife, Martha Routh, was born March 5th, 1781, and they were married November 5th, 1801. Samuel Moon came to Tennessee in 1796 and in the fall of 1808, with his wife and family came to Clark Township, Clinton County, Ohio.

When they came to Clinton County all was a wilderness; there were but six cabins within the limits of what is now Clark Township, Clinton County. The Indians were still here in roving bands, and wild animals still roamed the forest at will.

To Samuel and Martha (Routh) Moon were born twelve children, as follows: 1st, Joseph R. Moon, who married Elenor Hunter; 2nd, William R , who married Emily Roberts; 3rd, Mary, who married Archebaus Gibson; 4th, Isaac, who married Edna Smithson; 5th, Asa, who married Lucinda Sharp; 6th, Susannah who married John B League; 7th, Nancy, who married Coleman League; 8th, Joshua, who married Eliza Gillasire Smithson; 9th, David, who married Margaret Smith; 10th, Simeon, who married Priscilla Sewell; 11th, George, born May 1st, 1822, married October 14th, 1843, to Elizabeth Smith, who was born May 31st, 1824; 12th, Alva, who married Delilah Sewell.

George Moon

To George Moon and Elizabeth (Smith) Moon were born nine children as follows:

1st, Sarah A., born March 25th 1845; 2nd, Mary E., born January 8th, 1847; 3rd, John A., born November 16th, 1848, 4th, Columbus, (father of Galen Moon) born March 16th, 1851; 5th, Margaret E., born March 7th, 1853; 6th, Marion N., born September 5th, 1856; 7th, Asa S., born March 16th, 1858; 8th, Oscar J., born March 9th, 1861,; 9th, Ulyses S., born May 11th, 1864.

Descendants of Alva and Delilah (Sewell) Moon

Alva and Delilah (Sewell) Moon had six sons and four daughters, among whom were:

1st, Joseph W. Moon, president of the Moon Motor Car Company, president of the Moon Motor Car Company, office and factory, Main and Cornelia Street, 4400 North, St. Louis, Mo.; 2nd, John C. Moon, of the Moon Brothers' Carriage Company, 3843 Pine Street, St. Louis, Mo.; 3rd, Samuel Moon, brother of Joseph and John, is in Columbus, Ohio, address: 208 East Frambes Avenue.

(Grateful acknowledgment is made to Mr. Asa S. Moon of Martinsville, Ohio, for the data in reference to the descendants of Joseph Moon.)

In 1882 there were in Clinton County 882 descendants of Joseph Moon.

The Moons of Rhode Island

John, immigrant ancestor and his wife, Sarah, lived at Newport, R. I., and was a tax-payer there prior to 1660. His second wife was Sarah, daughter of Thomas and Martha Sheriff. He and his wife both died in 1732. They had the following children: John, II; Sarah, who married Thomas Corey; Abigail, who married a Vaughan; Martha, who married Michael Corey, brother of Thomas Corey, and Elizabeth. John, III, son of John, II, was born August 26th, 1711. He had a son or grandson, Dake, born about 1760, and married, by Elder Elisha Greene in 1785 at West Grenwic, R. I., Lydia Waite. In 1790 James and Oliver Moon had families at West Greenwich, R. I. They were probably brothers of Dake. Robert and Ebeneezer Moon lived in Newport in 1676. Ebeneezer and Sanford Moon were heads of families and lived in Rhode Island in 1790.

The Moons of Massachusetts

Robert Moon and his wife, Dorothy, lived in Boston in 1645, and in that year had born to them a son, Ebeneezer. In 1790 the family was located at Hampshire, Berkshire, Lee, Cumming, Stockbridge and Tyringham. The heads of families were: Benjamin, Abraham, Joseph, John and George.

The Moons in New York

The Moons of New York descended from various Pennsylvania and Rhode Island pioneer families. In 1790 these were the heads of families: Alpheus, Anna, Benaja, Darius, Elizabeth, Henry, Job, John, John R., Michael, Minjah, Peleg, Robert and William: In 1787 Dake Moon moved from Rhode Island to Petersburg, N. Y., where he remained until his death in 1819, his wife died in 1847. They had two sons, Simon and Jefferson. Jefferson Moon, son of Simon, was born at Petersburg, N. Y., in 1801. The family moved from Petersburg to northern New York with their household goods on an ox cart. In 1822 he purchased what was known as the Camp Ground Farm in Trenton, Oneida County, where he remained until 1833, when he sold this place and removed to Cold Brook, Herkimer County, where he lived until his death in 1885. He married, first, Miss Martha Phillips on August 13th, 1820, who died March 3rd, 1853. Martha Phillips was a descendant of General Ethan Allen. Jefferson Moon married, second, Miss Sophia Nelson of Newport, N. Y., on September 26th, 1855. William Wallace, son of Jefferson Moon, was born in Cold Brook in 1843. He was married in 1886 to Alice McVoy. He owns much real estate and other property in Herkimer County, and has filled many positions of prominence in the county.

James Wallace, son of William Wallace Moon, was born March 19th, 1867, at Cold Brook, N. Y. He married September 3rd, 1889, Nellie Elizabeth Rhodes. Their children are: Stanley S., born July 15th, 1890, and Marjorie Mary, born June 22nd, 1894. Mr. Moon has accumulated quite a large amount of real estate and other property. He is a Mason, a member of the Methodist Church, and for several years filled the office of Sheriff of Herkimer County.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

The name of Moon in Dutch is Moen; Flemish, Moine; Welch, Mwyn; and means affiable, pleasant.

Moons and their kindred at Jamestown prior to 1623: Nicholas Moon, Captain John Moon, Francis Balwdwin, Edward Brooks, John Brooks, Richard Brooks, John Brooke, George Farmer, Chrostopher Farmer.

Moons and their kindred in the Revolutionary War from Virginia, Hanover County; Officers: Captain William Coles, (ancestor of Harriet Coles Moon), Captain George Dabney, Captain Owen Dabney, Col. Charles Dabney, Captain Isaac Winston, (ancestor of Harriet (Coles) Moon). Privates; Rev. John Dabney and Robert Dabney.

From Albermarle County: Lieutenant Archelaus Moon, Lieutenant Jacob Moon, Paymaster, who was killed in the Battle of Guilford Court House, North Carolina; Private, Pleasant Moon. All of the foregoing served in the 14th Virginia Regiment.

From Lunenburg County: Private Thomas Moon.

Several Moons served in the Revolutionary War from North Carolina, one of whom, was Private Thomas Moon.

Moons and their kinsmen in the Revolutionary War from Georgia: Abraham Baldwin, Chaplain; David Baldwin, Sr., Captain; Mordacai Baldwin, Lieutenant; William Baldwin, Sergeant; David Baldwin, Jr., Private; Francis Baldwin, Private; John Moon, Private; James Moon, Private; George Moon, Private; Richard Moon, Private; Samuel Moon, Private. Each of the Georgia soldiers listed here, received a land bounty in Washington County, Georgia, on account of service in the Revolutionary War.

The Georgia Land Register shows that the following persons drew land in the land lottery of 1827: John Coles, of Coles, Columbia County; John Moon, Coles, Columbia County; Archelaus Moon, Hannah, Madison County; George Moon, Robertson, Gwinnett County; James Moon, Adkinson, Warren County; John Moon, Dodson, Fayette County; William Adcock, Edwards, DeKalb County; David Griffith, Gwinnett County.

At a land lottery for Hancock County, for 1806, the following drew land: Simon Moon; Mary Moon, orphan of Jacob Moon.

SOME EARLY MARRIAGE RECORDS OF MOONS AND THEIR KINSMEN

France

In the year 672 a Baldwin of Flanders married the daughter of Alfred the Great.

About the year 837 Baldwin of the Iron Arm married Judith, daughter of King Charles, the Bald, of France.

Early in the 11th Century Matilda, daughter of the Duke of Flanders, married William the Conqueror.

Early Marriages in England

Thomas Haynes to Dorothy Moon, 1651, St. James, Clerkenwell, III

William Mohun and Mary Morgan, 1661, Canterbury.

William Moon and Mary Steward, 1762, St. George, Hanover Square.

Some Early Marriages in Virginia

Goochland County:

Isham Farmer and Judith Moon, 1760.

Anna Farmer and Isiah Webb, 1770.

Mary Farmer and William Webb, 1770.

Mary Farmer and Job Harries, 1785.

John Farmer and Christina Eckerson, 1796.

The last named from Augusta County official record.

Record of Marriages of Lunenburg County, Virginia

Parham B. Moon to Petronella Wood, 1830.

Theodowick Farmer to Elizabeth Moon, 1829.

Alexander B. Moon to Nancy Carter, 1827.

J. D. Baily to Elizabeth Ann Moon, 1820.

Jesse Moon to Parmelia Farmer, 1814.

John Moon to Mary Dudley, 1795.

Lodowick Moon to Kizzie Johnson, 1825.

Stephen Pool to Lucinda Moon, 1824.

James Skinner to Martha Moon, 1834.

Matthew P. Moon to Jane Parrish, 1836.

John W. Rogers to Polly Moon, 1814.

Tyre Glenn to Rachael Moon, 1785.

William R. Geers to Sarah Moon, 1813.

Stephen P. Pool to Susannah Moon, 1824.

Marriages in Rhode Island

Phoeba Moon to Caleb Briggs, East Grenwich, 1786.

Mary Moon to Jobe Straight, West Grenwich, 1771.

Peleg Moon (son of James) to Mary Watson, West Grenwich, 1768.

Lois Moon to Samuel Watson, West Grenwich, 1768.

Robert Moon to Elizabeth Watson, West Grenwich, 1762.

Jonathan Moon to Lydia Darling, West Grenwich, 1757.

 


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